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John Gibbon (search for this): chapter 24
a dense forest of pines, of young growth, extending to the right and left from the turnpike, with skirmishers in advance, Heth's division, strengthened on both flanks, but especially on the left to keep touch with Ewell, and with Poague's battalion of artillery in the roadway, awaited Hancock's attack, which was in preparation but a few hundred yards in advance. Shortly after reaching the scene of conflict, at about half past 4, Hancock strengthened Getty's waiting division with portions of Gibbon's and Owens', and four Federal divisions, with other troops in reserve, advanced to engage with Hill's two. A furious combat followed, in which the contending lines met each other, face to face. Hill's men, crouching behind their slight breastworks, sheltered themselves as best they could, as a storm of Federal bullets, cutting off the tops of the dense growth in front, sped to the Confederate line, which met the Federal advance with deliberate aim and drove it back, although held to its w
Henry Heth (search for this): chapter 24
ard Johnson and Rodes; A. P. Hill, with his division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Heth and Wilcox. It is said that after his information-seeking overlook of the Federastward. Hill's line sprang forward to meet these; he then reinforced that with Heth's division, and a general battle appeared to have begun on Lee's right Near the hesitate in pressing an advance beyond Lee's right, or rather his center, where Heth had met and driven back Crawford, leading Warren to the southward. Heth pushed Heth pushed his advantage in driving Crawford back along the plank road, met Getty at the crossing of the Brock road, and forced him to halt on the direct way to Richmond, which ard Shady Grove church, scarcely three miles away, at 11 a.m., just as Ewell and Heth were in hot engagement with Getty, when he was ordered back to Getty's contest, extending to the right and left from the turnpike, with skirmishers in advance, Heth's division, strengthened on both flanks, but especially on the left to keep touc
ll promptly moved forward the brigades of Gordon and Daniel, crushed Griffin's victory disordered advance, and fell on the flank of the divisions of Crawford and Wadsworth. These he routed, and captured four Federal guns and many prisoners. Warren closed up his corps front, with his left retired, through the forest, toward Wilder advance, again assaulting Hill's weak line (that Lee had expected to replace with Longstreet, before daylight), but which he could not force from its position. Wadsworth moved against Hill's left flank, at the same time that Hancock developed a large force around his right. Thus flanked, Hill was forced from the field, stubbornlhimself said, like a wet blanket. By 10 o'clock, Lee's counterstroke, on Hancock's front and flank, had driven back his brigades and broken up his right, under Wadsworth; and by noon, Grant's entire left had been defeated and disorganized. Hancock's chief of staff, the truth-telling Walker, says of this time: Down the plank road
Philip H. Sheridan (search for this): chapter 24
ck. Burnside held the Ninth, as a sort of rear guard, north of the Rappahannock. It took 20,000 men to care for Grant's vast army train, leaving about 120,000 for fighting duty. With these were 274 field guns, of the most improved kind; while Sheridan, with some 13,000 cavalry, guarded the advance and flanks of the movement. This, said one of Grant's subordinates, was the best clothed and best fed army that ever took the field. Its supply train, if extended in single line of march, would ha and captured a Federal battery, but lost it when forced back by a vigorous Federal repulse, which Hancock followed up with repeated and desperate but unsuccessful assaults on Hill's line. Stuart, on the extreme right, drove back the charges of Sheridan's cavalry. After this first day of Wilderness battle was over, Lee telegraphed to Richmond, By the blessing of God we maintained our position against every effort until night, when the contest closed. During the night of the 5th, Hill's and
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 24
fected. Forty-eight hours now will demonstrate whether the enemy intends giving battle this side of Richmond. Telegraph Butler that we have crossed the Rapidan. He then had with him not less than 127,000 men, that, almost without opposition, had reached the old fighting ground of The Wilderness. He had told Butler that he would let him know when he had made this much progress in his campaign, and had ordered that he should make simultaneous movement from Fort Monroe, up the James, to an assavails in this army, and I feel at present no apprehension for the result. My efforts will be to form a junction with General Butler as early as possible, and be prepared to meet any enemy interposing. The result of the three days fighting at the Ol in the Wilderness battles, are ample confessions that Lee had thoroughly deranged Grant's confident plan of campaign. He was no longer urging Meade to hunt for Lee, and was looking anxiously for co-operation with Butler and the army of the James.
. With the 28,000 men of Hill and Ewell, Lee hastened to the front, his artillery moving with his infantry, to support Stuart, who, in joyful combat, was already fighting back every step of the Federal advance. Lee rode with Hill at the head of the right-hand column, on the Orange plank road, sending message after message to hurry up Longstreet, to support the Confederate right when the battle should be joined. At the close of the 4th of May, Grant telegraphed, from Germanna ford, to Halleck, chief of staff of the army at Washington: The crossing of the Rapidan effected. Forty-eight hours now will demonstrate whether the enemy intends giving battle this side of Richmond. Telegraph Butler that we have crossed the Rapidan. He then had with him not less than 127,000 men, that, almost without opposition, had reached the old fighting ground of The Wilderness. He had told Butler that he would let him know when he had made this much progress in his campaign, and had ordered that
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 24
the closing days of April Early in that month Grant arrived at Culpeper Court House, having in minrs were given from the signal station. When Grant ordered his forward movement, on the 4th of Maand flanks of the movement. This, said one of Grant's subordinates, was the best clothed and best lank. Stuart informed Lee of the arrival of Grant's army, on the north bank of the Rapidan, oppoignal officer from Clark's mountain waved that Grant's columns were in motion toward the Confederat be joined. At the close of the 4th of May, Grant telegraphed, from Germanna ford, to Halleck, cike, with his advance but an hour's march from Grant's passing flank, on the same road, at the Wildiles south of the old Wilderness tavern, where Grant and Meade, accompanied by Assistant Secretary spect for defeating him as he turned back from Grant's on to Richmond. The three hours between 11 e 5th, and another on the morning of the 6th. Grant ordered these fresh troops to make attack on L[17 more...]
t of pines, of young growth, extending to the right and left from the turnpike, with skirmishers in advance, Heth's division, strengthened on both flanks, but especially on the left to keep touch with Ewell, and with Poague's battalion of artillery in the roadway, awaited Hancock's attack, which was in preparation but a few hundred yards in advance. Shortly after reaching the scene of conflict, at about half past 4, Hancock strengthened Getty's waiting division with portions of Gibbon's and Owens', and four Federal divisions, with other troops in reserve, advanced to engage with Hill's two. A furious combat followed, in which the contending lines met each other, face to face. Hill's men, crouching behind their slight breastworks, sheltered themselves as best they could, as a storm of Federal bullets, cutting off the tops of the dense growth in front, sped to the Confederate line, which met the Federal advance with deliberate aim and drove it back, although held to its work by a str
R. H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 24
cLaws; Ewell, and his division commanders, Early, Edward Johnson and Rodes; A. P. Hill, with his division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Heth and Wilcox. It is said that after his information-seeking overlook of the Federal camps, Lee turned to these on to take one of his own choosing, which led to delay and later held him from the field of battle at a critical moment. Anderson's division, of Hill's corps, was left to guard the rear. With the 28,000 men of Hill and Ewell, Lee hastened to the fas soon fairly enveloped in a circle of fire; but it flinched not, and soon staggered the Federal column, and then, when Anderson and Benning brought up their Georgians and Law his Alabamians, in support, Hancock's line was forced to yield, not to nuot knowing of the existence of Hancock's formidable intrenchments, Lee's right, consisting of the divisions of Field and Anderson, charged against Hancock, on the Brock road, to find themselves confronted by a wall of fire, made by the burning of the
John B. Hood (search for this): chapter 24
n America—the impending conflict would begin, immediate preparations for which he took in hand on returning to his camp. Lee was accompanied to his point of observation by Longstreet, just returned from his Tennessee campaign; Field, commanding Hood's old division, and Kershaw, that of McLaws; Ewell, and his division commanders, Early, Edward Johnson and Rodes; A. P. Hill, with his division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Heth and Wilcox. It is said that after his information-seeking overlook of right. Lee caught sight of these long-expected reinforcements and rode to meet them. What boys are these? he asked, as he met the head of the column under Field. The word passed, as by electric flash, and the quick reply came, from the men of Hood, who had led many a brave assault, Texas boys. When the voice of the great leader clearly rang out, My Texas boys, you must charge. , The response of the 800 present for duty was an answering cheer that gave assurance of victory when the charge
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