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William Nelson (search for this): chapter 30
his artillery to General Lee at Petersburg, and King's battalion of artillery to southwest Virginia. Subsequent withdrawals left Early's army consisting of two small brigades, less than a full regiment in numbers, of Wharton's infantry division, Nelson's battalion of artillery, and the cavalry of Lomax and Rosser. Early established his headquarters in Staunton, placed his artillery in a camp near Waynesboro, cantoned Wharton's infantry near Fishersville, and widely and far to the front distrge numbers of soldiers swarmed across the country that had left the army of Northern Virginia without surrendering, though but few had brought away their arms. A portion of the cavalry went away during the night of the 11th. On the 12th Col. William Nelson, one of the most chivalric of an army of chivalrous men, disbanded his artillery battalion, leaving his guns at Pittsylvania Court House, and distributing the horses among his men, as he sadly bade them Godspeed to their homes. General Lo
arehouses filled with army supplies, burning a church that had been used for this purpose, and destroying the railway bridges and stations for a few miles northeastward of Wytheville. Having accomplished so much in the way of damaging the Confederacy, Stoneman retired to the vicinity of Glade Spring, and on the 20th and 21st drove away the small force at the salt works and greatly damaged that important and indispensable salt-making establishment. On the 22d he retired from Saltville. Burbridge's portion of his command then returned westward, by the way of Pound gap, on the 27th, to Catlettsburg, at the mouth of the Big Sandy in Kentucky, and Gillem's command returned to Knoxville on the 29th, reporting that it had marched 461 miles during this expedition, in intensely cold and inclement weather. The damage inflicted upon southwest Virginia by this Federal. raid, in the destruction of railway and turnpike bridges, railway stations and warehouses, iron works, woolen mills, le
John Randolph Tucker (search for this): chapter 30
at the battle of Cedar Creek, on the morning of September 9th, in the absence of General Sherman, confessed to him that the Sixth corps was as badly damaged, or nearly so, as were the Eighth and Ninth, by Early's attack, and was, in his opinion, in no condition to resist a third attack, if such had been made. On the 27th of February, the regular monthly court day of Augusta county, there was a large meeting of the citizens of the city and county, which was earnestly addressed by Hon. John Randolph Tucker, Hon. A. H. H. Stuart and others, in reference to supplying the wants of Lee's army. The meeting was quite enthusiastic, and a large subscription of supplies and money was promptly made by those present. On the 28th of February the enemy was reported as again marching up the Valley with a large force, rumor saying that it was Hancock with 20,000 men. Its advance reached Mt. Jackson the night of the 27th and approached Harrisonburg late on the 28th. Great excitement prevailed i
Shenandoah (search for this): chapter 30
amps of a few cavalrymen at each place, many miles from headquarters, with numerous intervening mountains and streams to cross, when Sheridan began his second Valley campaign, starting from Winchester on the 27th of February, 1865. Rosser's expedition to Beverly, western Virginia, was one of the striking episodes of the early part of the year 1865. Leaving his camp, near Swoope's, on the Virginia Central railroad, eight miles west of Staunton, on January 7th, he crossed the Big North, Shenandoah, Shaw's ridge and Bull Pasture mountains, and encamped that night at McDowell, on the Bull Pasture river. On the 8th, crossing Jackson's River mountain, passing through Monterey and crossing the Alleghany mountain, he encamped at Yeager's, on the Back Alleghany, near the old encampment of Gen. Edward Johnson during the previous winter. On the 9th, crossing Greenbrier river and the Cheat mountains and river, he encamped at Stipe's, near the western foot of Cheat mountain, not far from Hut
Alexander H. H. Stuart (search for this): chapter 30
reek, on the morning of September 9th, in the absence of General Sherman, confessed to him that the Sixth corps was as badly damaged, or nearly so, as were the Eighth and Ninth, by Early's attack, and was, in his opinion, in no condition to resist a third attack, if such had been made. On the 27th of February, the regular monthly court day of Augusta county, there was a large meeting of the citizens of the city and county, which was earnestly addressed by Hon. John Randolph Tucker, Hon. A. H. H. Stuart and others, in reference to supplying the wants of Lee's army. The meeting was quite enthusiastic, and a large subscription of supplies and money was promptly made by those present. On the 28th of February the enemy was reported as again marching up the Valley with a large force, rumor saying that it was Hancock with 20,000 men. Its advance reached Mt. Jackson the night of the 27th and approached Harrisonburg late on the 28th. Great excitement prevailed in Staunton, military stor
in reference to the difficulties that confronted him in the Shenandoah valley, the lower portion of which was still held by a large army under Sheridan, while but the fragments of an army, chiefly of broken down cavalry, remained in his command. Lee told Early that he was left in the Valley to create the impression that his force was much larger than it really was, and he instructed him to put on a bold front and do the best he could in holding Sheridan at bay. In consequence of a great duarters four miles further on at Mc-Daniel's, after a ride of 30 miles. Rosser, with his staff, rode on to Danville, expecting to meet Gen. R. E. Lee and his army at that point. The whole country was full of soldiers claiming to have escaped from Lee's surrender. On the 11th, Lomax's command marched, by way of Chalk Level, to seven miles beyond Pittsylvania Court House, toward Danville. On the 12th positive and reliable information was received that Gen. Robert E. Lee had surrendered himself
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 30
army of Northern Virginia, to come in and be paroled on the same terms as were those that were captured at Appomattox Court House, saying that all that did this would be permitted to remain, undisturbed, at their homes. The proposition of President Lincoln that Virginia should come back to the Union, without conditions, gained circulation on the 18th, and exercised a favorable influence upon the entire community. Late in the month of April, bands of marauders terrorized the people by gathement property. In reality they were stealing cattle, sheep and other things, wherever they could find them. A conflict of citizens took place with some of these, three miles from Staunton, on the 20th, on which day word came to the Valley that Lincoln had been assassinated. There was a general expression of indignation and profound regret, at this sad and untimely event. On the 24th of April the full bench of the justices of the peace of Augusta county, one of the leading ones of Virginia
southwest Virginia, having been duly advised of the movements of Stoneman's command, promptly made every effort to collect his scattered men to meet them; but in that inclement season it was impossible to get them together at so short a notice. Witcher's regiment of cavalry was nearly 100 miles away, in and near Mercer county, across the mountains to the northeast. A small body of militia, under General Preston, occupied the earthworks that defended the salt works at Saltville. Pushing forts. Much of it was soon repaired, and the lead and salt works were again quickly put in operation and the railway trains to running. Instances of heroism and fidelity to the Confederate cause in these days of extremity were not wanting. Colonel Witcher marched his command 90 miles in twenty-five hours, and reached Marion in time to aid in forcing the enemy to retire, although he was greatly inferior in numbers. Maj. J. Stoddard Johnston, General Breckinridge's adjutant-general, who was at
few cavalrymen at each place, many miles from headquarters, with numerous intervening mountains and streams to cross, when Sheridan began his second Valley campaign, starting from Winchester on the 27th of February, 1865. Rosser's expedition to Beverly, western Virginia, was one of the striking episodes of the early part of the year 1865. Leaving his camp, near Swoope's, on the Virginia Central railroad, eight miles west of Staunton, on January 7th, he crossed the Big North, Shenandoah, Shaw's ridge and Bull Pasture mountains, and encamped that night at McDowell, on the Bull Pasture river. On the 8th, crossing Jackson's River mountain, passing through Monterey and crossing the Alleghany mountain, he encamped at Yeager's, on the Back Alleghany, near the old encampment of Gen. Edward Johnson during the previous winter. On the 9th, crossing Greenbrier river and the Cheat mountains and river, he encamped at Stipe's, near the western foot of Cheat mountain, not far from Huttonsville
Basil Duke (search for this): chapter 30
nd united. with Stoneman's, which had advanced from Cumberland gap, near Bean's Station, east Tennessee, on the 12th, and had a skirmish with the outposts of Gen. Basil Duke near Rogersville; then an action with his advance at Kingsport, Tenn., on the 13th, defeating Duke and driving his command toward Bristol, near which place, aDuke and driving his command toward Bristol, near which place, at Papertown, on the 14th, Stoneman attacked Vaughn's Tennessee brigade, of the Confederate army, which was guarding the railroad and the main turnpike road leading into the southwestern part of the Great valley of Virginia, and forced him back toward Abingdon. Another skirmish took place on the 15th near that place and another ne Pushing forward with great energy, and having at his command some 5,500 men, nearly twice as many as Breckinridge could get together, Stoneman drove Vaughn's and Duke's commands before him, and pressing on passed Glade Spring, paying no attention to the Confederate force at Saltville, until he was delayed, by an action at Marion
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