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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion.

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August 12th (search for this): chapter 3
The Tenth Massachusets Battery Chapter 1: August 12 to October 14, 1862. Origin of the Battery going into camp incidents and experiences of life in home camp. It was mid summer of 1862. The disastrous failure of the Peninsular Campaign had shrouded the country in gloom. Thousands of the flower of the nation's youth who, burning with the most ardent and unselfish patriotism had been marshalled in the ranks of the magnificent Army of the Potomac, had crossed another river never to return. It was one of the darkest periods in the history of the Civil War. A triumphant enemy was likely to be an aggressive one. The disaster must be repaired and that right speedily. Then it was that President Lincoln, cast down but not destroyed, issued his call for 300,000 more volunteers and under this call the following special order was issued from the State House in Boston: Special order no. 614. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Headquarters, Boston, Aug. 12, 1862.
August 23rd (search for this): chapter 3
e recruiting officer, Mr. Granger, whose many estimable qualities as a man won the affection of all who came in contact with him; and this regard, implanted thus early in the hearts of the men, continued unabated to the day of his death. About thirty members of the Battery came from Worcester County, the home of Mr. Granger, thirty more from Charlestown, and the same number from Marblehead. The remainder were furnished by Boston and towns lying within a radius of twenty miles of it. August 23 was the day fixed upon for the Company to go into camp. On the morning of that day, about a hundred men assembled at the Eastern Railway Station in Boston. At the command, Fall in, Tenth! we formed line and went on board a train standing near to receive us, bound for Lynnfield, at that time one of the rendezvouses established for the reception of regiments and companies prior to their departure for the seat of war. This assemblage of men constituted the first tangible evidence that ther
September 9th (search for this): chapter 3
his truant flock, or found any end to his restless search, we never knew. In the morning Camp Stanton was established at Boxford. Here we pitched our tents and remained about six weeks, changing our location once during our stay. On the 9th of September we were mustered into the service of the United States by Lieut. M. Elder of the regular army, and received one month's pay in advance. During September the Boston Journal made the following notes regarding us: [Friday, Sept. 5, 1trate where they were well entertained. The occasion was one of much enjoyment and interest. Tenth Massachusetts Battery. [Thursday, Sept. 11, 1862.] The 10th Mass. Battery was mustered into the United States service on Tuesday afternoon (Sept. 9) by Lieut. M. Elder, U. S. Mustering Officer. While encamped here that disposition of the company to hang together which afterwards became proverbial, cropped out quite conspicuously; whether in rescuing a comrade from the Philistines of the
September 10th (search for this): chapter 3
during our stay. On the 9th of September we were mustered into the service of the United States by Lieut. M. Elder of the regular army, and received one month's pay in advance. During September the Boston Journal made the following notes regarding us: [Friday, Sept. 5, 1862. An order was promulgated yesterday that the 10th Mass. Battery, Lieut. H. H. Granger acting commander, should be mustered into the service Tuesday next, and that they should proceed to Washington on Wednesday, Sept. 10. The Battery is full and the boys are anxious to go; and such of them as are on furlough are requested to note the above arrangement and govern themselves accordingly. Marriage in camp. [Sept. 11, 1862.] On the evening of the 9th inst. Mr. Tobinas Beck of Charlestown was married at Camp Stanton, Boxford, to Miss Sarah Kilgore of Hampden, Me., by Benj. S. Barnes, Esq., J. P. The occasion brought together a great many of the ladies of Boxford and of the friends of the bridegroom
September 11th (search for this): chapter 3
tfully Yours, (Signed) Wm. Schouler, Adjt. General of Mass. The non-commissioned officers, with the exception of the second corporals, were now appointed; and our daily drill was carried on with two six-pounders, with which we waked the echoes of the camp and neighborhood at sunrise every day. But this peaceful state of affairs could not be expected to last forever, and, with the early days of October, there came rumors of orders to leave for the South. Morning reports. 1862. Sept. 11. Charles I.. Bisbee, Henry B. Winslow, Moses K. Davis, William Buckman, George H. Strickland, John A. Stearns, Peter Savory, Jr., Henry L. Wheelock, eight recruits over maximum, transferred to Col. Jones, Com—by order of Lieut. M. Elder, Mustering Officer. Sept. 14. The above eight recruits return to the care of the commander of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery. Sept. 23. George H. Strickland, one of the recruits, discharged on account of disability. Oct. 1. Capt. J. Henry Sleeper
September 14th (search for this): chapter 3
ighborhood at sunrise every day. But this peaceful state of affairs could not be expected to last forever, and, with the early days of October, there came rumors of orders to leave for the South. Morning reports. 1862. Sept. 11. Charles I.. Bisbee, Henry B. Winslow, Moses K. Davis, William Buckman, George H. Strickland, John A. Stearns, Peter Savory, Jr., Henry L. Wheelock, eight recruits over maximum, transferred to Col. Jones, Com—by order of Lieut. M. Elder, Mustering Officer. Sept. 14. The above eight recruits return to the care of the commander of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery. Sept. 23. George H. Strickland, one of the recruits, discharged on account of disability. Oct. 1. Capt. J. Henry Sleeper came into camp and took command. Oct. 3. Charles H. Bisbee, Henry B. Winslow, John A. Stearns, Moses K. Davis, Peter Savory, Jr., William Buckman and Henry L. Wheelock, seven recruits, transferred to Fifth Massachusetts Battery. Oct. 4. Samuel Abell received a s
September 27th (search for this): chapter 3
ver, and, with the early days of October, there came rumors of orders to leave for the South. Morning reports. 1862. Sept. 11. Charles I.. Bisbee, Henry B. Winslow, Moses K. Davis, William Buckman, George H. Strickland, John A. Stearns, Peter Savory, Jr., Henry L. Wheelock, eight recruits over maximum, transferred to Col. Jones, Com—by order of Lieut. M. Elder, Mustering Officer. Sept. 14. The above eight recruits return to the care of the commander of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery. Sept. 23. George H. Strickland, one of the recruits, discharged on account of disability. Oct. 1. Capt. J. Henry Sleeper came into camp and took command. Oct. 3. Charles H. Bisbee, Henry B. Winslow, John A. Stearns, Moses K. Davis, Peter Savory, Jr., William Buckman and Henry L. Wheelock, seven recruits, transferred to Fifth Massachusetts Battery. Oct. 4. Samuel Abell received a surgeon's furlough Sept. 27, and it was extended to Oct. 4. Not being able he did not return to camp
f that day, about a hundred men assembled at the Eastern Railway Station in Boston. At the command, Fall in, Tenth! we formed line and went on board a train standing near to receive us, bound for Lynnfield, at that time one of the rendezvouses established for the reception of regiments and companies prior to their departure for the seat of war. This assemblage of men constituted the first tangible evidence that there existed such an organization as the Tenth Massachusetts Battery. While sZZZ ers and seamen, blacksmiths and tailors, carpenters and teamsters, clerks fresh from the pen or yardstick, teachers, hard-handed laborers, policemen and restaurant keepers. All these, with men of various other callings, combined to make up a motley collection of tastes, interests and prejudices, such as war always assembles. But all these differences of calling and taste were to be sunk in a common unity of purpose and interest. Henceforth we should know each other as soldiers and soldier
House in Boston: Special order no. 614. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Headquarters, Boston, Aug. 12, 1862. Henry H. Granger is hereby authorized to raise a Battery of Light Artillery under U. S. Order No. 75, Battery to be full by 16th inst. The Captain will be designated hereafter. By command of His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in-Chief. (Signed) Wm. Brown, Asst. Adjt. Gen'l. The foregoing is a correct copy of the original order by which authorituit the Company afterwards known as the Tenth Massachusetts Battery. In the Boston Journal of August 13, 1862, appeared the following notice:— Henry H. Granger has been authorized to raise a battery of light artillery to be filled by the 16th inst. As this is a popular arm of the service, there is no doubt of his ability to raise a company by the time specified. So far as can be ascertained this is the first public notice of the company. In subsequent issues of the same paper occurre
October 1st (search for this): chapter 3
e day we received the compliments of the officer J. Henry Sleeper of the day for proficiency, and the next, drew down upon our defenceless heads the wrath of Col. Jones, the unpopular post commander, for setting his authority at defiance. Oct. 1, J. Henry Sleeper, the newly appointed Captain of the Company, arrived. He had been pronoted to this position from a first lieutenancy in the First Massachusetts Battery. By his interference we were relieved from camp guard,— a change which we of Lieut. M. Elder, Mustering Officer. Sept. 14. The above eight recruits return to the care of the commander of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery. Sept. 23. George H. Strickland, one of the recruits, discharged on account of disability. Oct. 1. Capt. J. Henry Sleeper came into camp and took command. Oct. 3. Charles H. Bisbee, Henry B. Winslow, John A. Stearns, Moses K. Davis, Peter Savory, Jr., William Buckman and Henry L. Wheelock, seven recruits, transferred to Fifth Massachusetts
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