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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion.

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and govern themselves accordingly. Marriage in camp. [Sept. 11, 1862.] On the evening of the 9th inst. Mr. Tobinas Beck of Charlestown was married at Camp Stanton, Boxford, to Miss Sarah Kilgore of Hampden, Me., by Benj. S. Barnes, Esq., J. P. The occasion brought together a great many of the ladies of Boxford and of the friends of the bridegroom and bride. The officers of the 10th Mass. Battery, of which the bridegroom is a member, were also interested spectators of the ceremony. Bond's Band volunteered their services and the whole party, military included, having formed a square, the ceremony was performed under the bright, shining moon. The happy pair afterwards received the congratulations of all present and then proceeded under escort to the house of the officiating magistrate where they were well entertained. The occasion was one of much enjoyment and interest. Tenth Massachusetts Battery. [Thursday, Sept. 11, 1862.] The 10th Mass. Battery was mustered into th
s failure of the Peninsular Campaign had shrouded the country in gloom. Thousands of the flower of the nation's youth who, burning with the most ardent and unselfish patriotism had been marshalled in the ranks of the magnificent Army of the Potomac, had crossed another river never to return. It was one of the darkest periods in the history of the Civil War. A triumphant enemy was likely to be an aggressive one. The disaster must be repaired and that right speedily. Then it was that President Lincoln, cast down but not destroyed, issued his call for 300,000 more volunteers and under this call the following special order was issued from the State House in Boston: Special order no. 614. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Headquarters, Boston, Aug. 12, 1862. Henry H. Granger is hereby authorized to raise a Battery of Light Artillery under U. S. Order No. 75, Battery to be full by 16th inst. The Captain will be designated hereafter. By command of His Excellency John A. An
William Schouler (search for this): chapter 3
Henry Sleeper, Porter's Battery, Mass. Vols. Lieut.,—I am directed by His Excellency the Governor to inform you that you have been appointed and commissioned as Capt. of a new Battery now organized in this Commonwealth known and designated as the 10th Battery of Mass. Volunteers, and you are requested to get leave from your — superior Officers and to report at once to these Head Quarters, where you will be ordered to take command of the new Battery. Respectfully Yours, (Signed) Wm. Schouler, Adjt. General of Mass. The non-commissioned officers, with the exception of the second corporals, were now appointed; and our daily drill was carried on with two six-pounders, with which we waked the echoes of the camp and neighborhood at sunrise every day. But this peaceful state of affairs could not be expected to last forever, and, with the early days of October, there came rumors of orders to leave for the South. Morning reports. 1862. Sept. 11. Charles I.. Bisbee, Henry
nfantry, where he won praise from his superiors for coolness and bravery in the first battle of Bull Run. Almost immediately after his time was out he joined Captain Porter's First Massachusetts Light Battery as Lieutenant and gained much credit for dashing bravery, coolness under fire and skill as an artillerist. Thus highly reters are self-explanatory: Headquarters Artillery Brigade, 1st Div. 6th Army Corps, Camp near Harrison's Landing, Aug. 4, 1862. Lieut. J. H. Sleeper of Porter's Battery A, Mass. Vol. Art'y has been under my command some months. During that time I have observed him in the camp, on the march and on the battlefield, and iptain 2d Artillery, Comd'g Artillery Brigade. Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Adjutant General's office. Boston, Sept. 9, 1862. Lieut. J. Henry Sleeper, Porter's Battery, Mass. Vols. Lieut.,—I am directed by His Excellency the Governor to inform you that you have been appointed and commissioned as Capt. of a new Batte
October 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 3
The Tenth Massachusets Battery Chapter 1: August 12 to October 14, 1862. Origin of the Battery going into camp incidents and experiences of life in home camp. It was mid summer of 1862. The disastrous failure of the Peninsular Campaign had shrouded the country in gloom. Thousands of the flower of the nation's youth who, burning with the most ardent and unselfish patriotism had been marshalled in the ranks of the magnificent Army of the Potomac, had crossed another river never to return. It was one of the darkest periods in the history of the Civil War. A triumphant enemy was likely to be an aggressive one. The disaster must be repaired and that right speedily. Then it was that President Lincoln, cast down but not destroyed, issued his call for 300,000 more volunteers and under this call the following special order was issued from the State House in Boston: Special order no. 614. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Headquarters, Boston, Aug. 12, 1862. H
ng on their beat. While waiting outside the lines, a heavy shower came up, and we concluded, while hugging the lee side of contiguous buildings and becoming drenched to the skin, that we were having a fair initiation into the experiences of a soldier's life. Sunshine again appearing, our prospects brightened materially. A company of one of the regiments in camp, going away on furlough, vacated its quarters for us. These consisted of two rows of tents, known interchangeably by the names of Sibley and Bell Tents; the former derived from the name of the inventor, the latter given from their resemblance to huge bells. They were pitched in two rows of six each, with a park between about four rods wide, at the head of which stood two wall tents occupied by the officers. These tents, located by themselves near a pleasant piece of woods, formed a more inviting camp than had been anticipated, and we were not long in accommodating ourselves to them. Those who had been familiar with the
O. O. Howard (search for this): chapter 3
mmanding, is full, and has been ordered into camp at Lynnfield to-day. They will leave Boston at 12 o'clock on the Boston and Maine R. R. J. Webb Adams of this city has been appointed Junior 1st Lieutenant. [Aug. 23, 1862.] The 10th Battery for three years service, recruited by Capt. Granger, left Boston for Camp Stanton at Lynnfield via Boston and Maine R. R., in the noon train to-day As the above notices show, a recruiting office was opened at the Old State House, and also at 16 Howard Street, and but few days elapsed before the Company was recruited to the required standard of one hundred and fifty-six men. The readiness with which men rallied was undoubtedly due in large measure to the gentlemanly bearing and personal magnetism of the recruiting officer, Mr. Granger, whose many estimable qualities as a man won the affection of all who came in contact with him; and this regard, implanted thus early in the hearts of the men, continued unabated to the day of his death.
August 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 3
ery. In the Boston Journal of August 13, 1862, appeared the following notice:— Henry H. Granger has been authorized to raise a battery of light artillery to be filled by the 16th inst. As this is a popular arm of the service, there is no doubt of his ability to raise a company by the time specified. So far as can be ascertained this is the first public notice of the company. In subsequent issues of the same paper occurred these notices:— Tenth Massachusetts Battery. [Aug. 14, 1862.] 50 more men wanted for the Tenth massachusetts Battery. Apply immediately to 17 Old State House or 16 Howard Street. H. H. Granger, Recruiting Officer. [Aug. 18, 1862.] The 10th Massachusetts Battery recruiting by Lieut. H. H. Granger, is rapidly filling up, over 125 men having already enlisted. A splendid opportunity is here offered to those who wish to enlist in this popular arm of the service for three years. Tenth Massachusetts Battery. [Aug. 23, 1862.] The 10th B
September 23rd (search for this): chapter 3
ver, and, with the early days of October, there came rumors of orders to leave for the South. Morning reports. 1862. Sept. 11. Charles I.. Bisbee, Henry B. Winslow, Moses K. Davis, William Buckman, George H. Strickland, John A. Stearns, Peter Savory, Jr., Henry L. Wheelock, eight recruits over maximum, transferred to Col. Jones, Com—by order of Lieut. M. Elder, Mustering Officer. Sept. 14. The above eight recruits return to the care of the commander of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery. Sept. 23. George H. Strickland, one of the recruits, discharged on account of disability. Oct. 1. Capt. J. Henry Sleeper came into camp and took command. Oct. 3. Charles H. Bisbee, Henry B. Winslow, John A. Stearns, Moses K. Davis, Peter Savory, Jr., William Buckman and Henry L. Wheelock, seven recruits, transferred to Fifth Massachusetts Battery. Oct. 4. Samuel Abell received a surgeon's furlough Sept. 27, and it was extended to Oct. 4. Not being able he did not return to camp
August 18th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 3
the 16th inst. As this is a popular arm of the service, there is no doubt of his ability to raise a company by the time specified. So far as can be ascertained this is the first public notice of the company. In subsequent issues of the same paper occurred these notices:— Tenth Massachusetts Battery. [Aug. 14, 1862.] 50 more men wanted for the Tenth massachusetts Battery. Apply immediately to 17 Old State House or 16 Howard Street. H. H. Granger, Recruiting Officer. [Aug. 18, 1862.] The 10th Massachusetts Battery recruiting by Lieut. H. H. Granger, is rapidly filling up, over 125 men having already enlisted. A splendid opportunity is here offered to those who wish to enlist in this popular arm of the service for three years. Tenth Massachusetts Battery. [Aug. 23, 1862.] The 10th Battery, H. H. Granger commanding, is full, and has been ordered into camp at Lynnfield to-day. They will leave Boston at 12 o'clock on the Boston and Maine R. R. J. Webb Adams
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