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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion. Search the whole document.

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Dillingham (search for this): chapter 6
rmont Infantry, who evidently knew but little of artillery matters, and being under the influence of too much commissary ventured criticisms on no point except our dishes, taking the opportunity to recommend to us a new improvement, sold by a Capt. Dillingham of his regiment, consisting of a dipper furnished with a wire bail. He returned in transports at our appearance, and, having seen double, reported Capt. Sleeper's Battery of twelve guns and three hundred men as in splendid condition. We, on the other hand, took the hint about the dippers, and from that day forward a tin vessel fitted with a wire bail was known among us as a Dillingham. The weather becoming quite warm, nearly every man appeared under a straw hat, purchased in the town at the store of Jesse T. Higgins, one of two grocers then located there. During the first week in May the battle of Chancellorsville was fought and lost. Soon afterwards the Rebel movement northward began, and our days of quiet were broken i
Edwin F. Damrell (search for this): chapter 6
ay 13, 1863. June 3. Received of Capt. Tompkins at Washington 23 horses. Wilson reported for duty. June 7. J. T. Goodwin reported to quarters. June 11. George H. Nichols reported for duty. June 15. Serg't Allard, privates Corlew and Damrell reported to quarters. Private G. W. Parks returns from extended sick furlough and reported for duty. June 16. Donnelly reported to quarters. June 17. Privates Damrell, Frost and Donnelly, and Sergeant Allard reported for duty. Corp'l ShPrivates Damrell, Frost and Donnelly, and Sergeant Allard reported for duty. Corp'l Shattuck and Private Corlew sent to General Hospital, Washington, D. C. June 18. Millett reported to quarters. June 19. Millett reported for duty. June 20. Privates John Knowland, John Millett, Frank A. Chase, John W. Bailey reported to quarters. June 21. Privates Knowland, Millett, Chase and Bailey reported for duty. Corp'l William H. Starkweather and Private Asa Richardson reported to quarters. June 22. Private Waldo Pierce reported to quarters. Corp'l Starkweather reported fo
Robert Crawford (search for this): chapter 6
ted for dismounted duty; Pierce (?) and Chase reported for quarters. April 20. C. E. Woodis taken to Camp Hospital yesterday; H. Chase reported for dismounted duty. April 22. Pierce (?) Colbath and Stowell reported for duty. April 23. Crawford reported to quarters. April 24. Crawford reported to duty; Thayer to quarters. April 25. White reported for duty, also Thayer. April 26. Corp'l Smith reported to quarters. April 27. Corp'l Smith reported to light duty; Parks starteCrawford reported to duty; Thayer to quarters. April 25. White reported for duty, also Thayer. April 26. Corp'l Smith reported to quarters. April 27. Corp'l Smith reported to light duty; Parks started for home on 20 days furlough; John C. Frost sent to hospital. April 28. C. E. Woodis reported for stable duty. T. G. Redfield started for Washington on furlough. April 29. Chas. E. Woodis reported to quarters. One black horse died; disease * * * May 2. Leverett Pierce reported to quarters. Capt. Sleeper started for Washington on business. May 4. Herring and Chase reported sick. Pierce (?) and Chase sent to Camp Hospital. May 5. Woodis reported for stable duty. Packard re
Everett J. Wilson (search for this): chapter 6
he town, more troops were at once sent, and we found already encamped here the Fourteenth New Hampshire and Thirty-ninth Massachusetts regiments, commanded by Colonels Wilson and Davis, respectively. How are you, Boxford? was the greeting from the latter regiment as soon as we were recognized, and it seemed like meeting old frien May 27. Dropped Critchett from the rolls as a deserter. Received notice of Samuel A. Hanson's discharge. June 1. Nichols reported for quarters. June 2. Wilson reported for quarters. Received notice of the discharge of E. T. Atwood for disability May 13, 1863. June 3. Received of Capt. Tompkins at Washington 23 horses. Wilson reported for duty. June 7. J. T. Goodwin reported to quarters. June 11. George H. Nichols reported for duty. June 15. Serg't Allard, privates Corlew and Damrell reported to quarters. Private G. W. Parks returns from extended sick furlough and reported for duty. June 16. Donnelly reported to quarters. Ju
George H. Innis (search for this): chapter 6
Horse died of glanders. Dec. 28. One horse died of disease of the liver. Arrived at Poolsville about 11 o'clock A. M. Dec. 31. Mustered in for pay by Maj. H. M. Tremlett, 39th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. 1863. Jan. 3. George H. Innis, Samuel J. Bradlee, E. T. Atwood and Harmon Newton sick in quarters. Jan. 4. George H. Innis returned to duty. Serg't. Geo. H. Putnam sick. Jan. 5. William Rawson sick in quarters. Serg't. Alden sick in quarters. Jan. 6. Wm. RawsGeorge H. Innis returned to duty. Serg't. Geo. H. Putnam sick. Jan. 5. William Rawson sick in quarters. Serg't. Alden sick in quarters. Jan. 6. Wm. Rawson returned to duty. Joseph Brooks and John Norton * * * Jan. 7. Francis Loham sick in Camp Hospital. Serg'ts Alden and Putnam returned to duty. Jan. 8. Harmon Newton returned to duty. C. N. Barker sick in quarters. Jan.9. S. J. Bradlee and Joseph Brooks returned to duty. Jan. 10. Joseph Cross and W. S. Roundy sick in quarters. Jan. 11. James Dwight returned to duty. Jan. 12. W. S. Roundy returned to duty. Jan. 14. C. E. Woodis sick in quarters. Jan. 15. Wm. Raws
. His grave is still to be seen (1879) in the little cemetery near the church. Partly through the influence of a Mr. Metzger, the postmaster, who, except one Dr. Brace, was the only Union man in the town, more troops were at once sent, and we found already encamped here the Fourteenth New Hampshire and Thirty-ninth Massachusettither they or their commands, or both, are green. At first we pitched our tents on a level tract of land outside and near the town, but it being considered by Dr. Brace too flat to be healthy, we moved soon afterwards to a rise of ground a few rods distant. Here we laid out a plan for a permanent camp. From the quarters occupie ascertained, it was the final appearance of the Guidon in the role of a raider. One of the men, an expert in the business, took poultry from the premises of Dr. Brace near by, in open daylight. He was detected, however, and by order of the Captain taken under guard to the house to return the fowls, now ready for the pot, and
Chandler Gould (search for this): chapter 6
ers. Battery mustered (for pay) by Capt. Sleeper. March 1. N. H. Butterfield returned to duty. Lieut. Adams leave of absence till Wednesday morning. March 2. Chas. E. Prince and John C. Frost reported sick in quarters. March 3. Sergt. Chandler Gould reduced to the ranks and Corporal L. R. Allard promoted to Sergt. vice Gould removed. One horse shot per order Capt. Sleeper, disease glanders. J. P. Brown reported sick in quarters March 4. John Norton reported for light duty. J.Gould removed. One horse shot per order Capt. Sleeper, disease glanders. J. P. Brown reported sick in quarters March 4. John Norton reported for light duty. J. L. W. Thayer reported sick in quarters. Lieut. Adams returned. March 5. Nine horses condemned (5 turned in and 4 shot), 50 nose bags and 1 linen wall tent also condemned per Col. A. B. Nowell (?) (Jewett) commanding brigade. March 6. Chas. E. Prince reported for duty. John H. Knowland reported sick in quarters. March 7. Lieut. Asa Smith returned from furlough and reported for duty yesterday afternoon. J. H. Knowland reported for duty. March 9. S. A. Hanson reported for light dut
John P. Apthrop (search for this): chapter 6
t, and immediately after a well-directed shot, the occupant, who, it seemed, was at home, issued forth very promptly, attended by her family Camp of the Tenth Massachutts Battery, Poolsville, Md., winter of 1862—3. from a sketch drawn by John P. Apthrop. unharmed, but amazingly astonished. On another occasion the colors were set up as a target, and the staff was cut in halves by a ball from a spherical case shot. The stormy season came at last, with its accompaniment of mud, and drill work; the wheels instantly slip to their places; by a strong pull altogether four men raise the gun with handspikes till it is again poised Camp of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery, Poolsville, Md., summer of 1863. from a sketch drawn by John P. Apthrop. on the muzzle; meanwhile, the carriage has been pushed up with elevated trail, and the heavy piece falls back promptly with its trunnions in their appointed sockets. A few nimble leaps restore the implements to their respective places, a
George M. Townsend (search for this): chapter 6
s. Jan. 29. Harrison Chase returned to quarters. Jan. 30. Joseph Cross and John (Harmon?) New ton returned to light duty. Jan. 31. Harrison Chase returned to duty. John (?) Newton, Jos. Cross, John P. Brown and F. A. Chase sick in quarters. Feb. 1. John Pedrick sick in quarters. The Battery, books, quarters, stable &c., were fully inspected by Col. P. S. Davis, 39th Massachusetts Regiment. Feb. 2. James Peach returned to duty. One bay horse, white faced, ridden by Sergt. Townsend, died of lung fever. Harrison Chase and John H. Knowland sick in quarters. Feb. 3. E. T. Atwood, C. N. Barker, Frank A. Chase, and John H. Knowland reported for duty. Capt. Sleeper went on furlough. Benj. H. Phillips' sentence having expired he is reported for duty. Feb. 4. Joseph Cross and John Norton reported for duty. Frank A. Chase sick in quarters. Feb. 5. Frank A. Chase reported for duty. John Norton reported sick in quarters. Feb. 6. Jos. Cross reported sick in
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 6
or, the quaint portraiture of Ichabod Crane, the schoolmaster of Sleepy Hollow. He passed by the name of William Walker. He professed to be a spy, employed by Gen. Hooker on very secret service, frequenting the Rebel camps to pick up information, and claimed to have saved our camp from a surprise, early in the spring, by giving th returned in a half hour reporting a false alarm. It arose, as we ascertained in the morning, from three or four cavalrymen who had strayed from a detachment of Hooker's army and lain down by the wall to sleep. We treated them to a good breakfast, and from them received our first reliable news of the great invasion. Soon after, men from Edwards Ferry reported the Army of the Potomac as crossing there. An army telegraph was being stretched past our camp, said to connect with Gen. Hooker's headquarters and we now felt safe from attack, but seemed likely to be swept into the current and borne on to the great battle which all felt must soon be fought. Th
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