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Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
d regiments who escaped from the wreck of Steuart's brigade of Johnson's division. After the battle of Cold Harbor he served with Early's corps in the relief of Lynchburg, the expedition through Maryland to Washington, including the battle of Monocacy, and the Shenandoah battles of the fall of 1864. He then returned to the heroicpril 9th the other two divisions of the corps, Evans' and Walker's, were put under his command, he having volunteered to make the attack to clear the road toward Lynchburg. He was successful in driving the enemy from his front, but after receiving repeated orders to withdraw fell back to his original line, and was then informed os assigned to the command of the division of General Early, with the rank of major-general. After the battle of Cold Harbor, his division was the first to reach Lynchburg to relieve the siege, attacked the retreating enemy at Liberty, and following him to Harper's Ferry took part in the expedition through Maryland, the battle at M
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
nd cavalry fight on the right of the army. In this bloody action Hampton was twice wounded, and Colonel Baker was given command of the brigade during the subsequent important work of protecting the retreat of the army, including fighting about Hagerstown and Falling Waters. After the army had crossed into Virginia, Colonel Baker was assigned the duty of picketing the Potomac from Falling Waters to Hedgesville, and had frequent skirmishes with the enemy until withdrawn to the line of the Rappahmoted lieutenant-colonel of his regiment, which was assigned to Wade Hampton's brigade. He commanded the detachment which took part in Hampton's raid on Dumfries in December, and in the spring of 1863 was commissioned colonel. In the fight at Hagerstown during the retreat from Gettysburg, a charge of the enemy was gallantly met and repulsed by Gordon with a fragment of the Fifth cavalry, that officer exhibiting under my eye individual prowess deserving special commendation, Stuart reported. I
Tyrrell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
mand in action until he received the injury that resulted in his death. His promise and usefulness as an officer were only equaled by the purity and excellence of his private life. Gen. A. P. Hill wrote: No man fell during this bloody battle of Gettysburg more regretted than he, nor around whose youthful brow were clustered brighter rays of glory. Brigadier-General James Johnston Pettigrew Brigadier-General James Johnston Pettigrew was born on the shores of Lake Scuppernong, in Tyrrell county, N. C., July 4, 1828, at Bonarva, the home of his father, Ebenezer Pettigrew, representative in Congress. The family was founded in America by James, youngest son of James Pettigrew, an officer of King William's army, rewarded by a grant of land for gallantry at the battle of the Boyne. Charles, son of the founder, was chosen the first bishop of North Carolina. Young Pettigrew was graduated at the State university in 1847, with such distinction that President Polk, who attended the comm
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
h as Knoxville, and remained in that department in command of cavalry under Longstreet and Buckner, until April, 1864, when he was ordered to Richmond, with the intention of assigning him to command of the TransMissis-sippi department. But the condition at the Confederate capital compelled his retention there, where he met Butler's operations at Bermuda Hundred and Sheridan's and Kautz's raids with the handful of men at his disposal. He commanded Beauregard's left wing at the battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, and gallantly stormed the enemy's breastworks, playing a prominent part in the corking up of Butler's army. In June he took command of Early's cavalry in the movement against Hunter and the expedition through Maryland against Washington. In August he was relieved on account of illness, in September served as president of a court of inquiry connected with Morgan's operations in Kentucky, in November was assigned to command at Charleston, but was soon compelled by illness to a
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ock. Here, on July 31st, the Federal cavalry crossed the river in force and advanced toward Brandy Station, stubbornly resisted by Hampton's brigade of cavalry under command of Colonel Baker, Generalh Carolina regiments, the First, Second, Fourth and Fifth. But the wound he had received at Brandy Station was a serious oneā€”the bones of his arm being completely shattered, and the use of it lost toments. General Barringer was in seventy-six actions and was thrice wounded, most severely at Brandy Station. He had two horses killed under him at other engagements. He was conspicuous at the battles of Willis' Church, Brandy Station, Auburn Mills; Buckland Races, where he led the charge; Davis' Farm, where he was commander; and he was in command of a division at Reams' Station. His brigade was. Junius Daniel, of Rodes' division and Ewell's corps. On June 10, 1863, Ewell's corps left Brandy Station, and two days later reached Cedarville, whence Ewell sent Rodes and Jenkins to capture Marti
Chamberlain Run (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
onspicuous at the battles of Willis' Church, Brandy Station, Auburn Mills; Buckland Races, where he led the charge; Davis' Farm, where he was commander; and he was in command of a division at Reams' Station. His brigade was distinguished at Chamberlain Run, March 31, 1865, when it forded a stream one hundred yards wide, saddle-girth deep, under a galling fire, and drove back a division of Federal cavalry, this being the last decisive Confederate victory on Virginia soil. On April 3, 1865, at wer of the press and in its influence for good. Among his latest pleasures were talking with the old veterans and contributing to the history of the war. In 1881 he wrote a series of cavalry sketches describing the battles of Five Forks and Chamberlain Run, Namozine Church, and other notable engagements, which are preserved to-day among the most interesting and valuable historical data of the war; and again he made valuable contributions to The War Between the States, published by John A. Sloa
Morgantown (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ished valuable evidence of the depth of the atmosphere by his observations on the August meteor of 1860, and affirmed long before the days of Edison that sound might in some way be transmitted with the speed of electricity. He published several volumes, including his public addresses. In later years the unselfish services which had brought him fame left him unprovided with the comforts of life, and the close of his days was a pathetic illustration of how the world may forget. He died at Morgantown, November 3, 1897. Brigadier-General John R. Cooke Brigadier-General John R. Cooke was born at Jefferson barracks, Mo., in 1833, the son of Philip St. George Cooke, then first lieutenant First dragoons, U. S. A. It is an interesting fact that while the son and his sister's husband, J. E. B. Stuart, fought for Virginia in the war of the Confederacy, the father, a native of Frederick county, Va., remained in the United States army, and attained the rank of major-general, finally being
Wade Hampton (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ed to the brigade of Gen. J. E. B. Stuart. On November 26, 1861, he gallantly led the charge in the first encounter of his regiment with the Federal cavalry, which was also the first engagement of Stuart's brigade with the same arm of the enemy, and was entirely successful. Thereafter he was among the foremost in every fight, and was frequently commended for bravery in the reports of Stuart. In the spring of 1862 he was promoted lieutenant-colonel of his regiment, which was assigned to Wade Hampton's brigade. He commanded the detachment which took part in Hampton's raid on Dumfries in December, and in the spring of 1863 was commissioned colonel. In the fight at Hagerstown during the retreat from Gettysburg, a charge of the enemy was gallantly met and repulsed by Gordon with a fragment of the Fifth cavalry, that officer exhibiting under my eye individual prowess deserving special commendation, Stuart reported. In September, 1863, he was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to c
Mitchell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ver. Cherish it. Associate it with the history of your past. Transmit it to your children. Teach them the rights of freemen and teach them to maintain them. Teach them the proudest day in all your proud career was that on which you enlisted as Southern soldiers. Upon the return of peace he devoted himself to the development of the material resources of the State, becoming the principal owner of the Chapel Hill iron mine, and obtaining a large interest in the Cranberry iron mine, in Mitchell county. Brigadier-General Robert D. Johnston Brigadier-General Robert D. Johnston, of North Carolina, at the time of the secession of his State, was second lieutenant in the Beattie's Ford rifles, State troops. He entered the Confederate service as captain of Company K, Twenty-third North Carolina infantry, July 15, 1861. His regiment was on the peninsula during 1861 and the spring of 1862, and participated in the battle of Williamsburg. On May 21 , 1862, he was promoted to the rank o
Fort Chadbourne (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
t an early age he entered the State university at Chapel Hill, and on graduation divided first honors with three others of his class. He was appointed to the United States military academy when seventeen years old, and was graduated tenth in a class of forty-three in 1852, with a commission in the Second dragoons. After a few months, at the cavalry school at Carlisle he was detailed to assist in the survey of a railroad route in California, after that duty rejoining his regiment at Fort Chadbourne, Tex. Having been promoted first lieutenant in 1855, he commanded his troop in the march from Texas across the plains to Fort Riley, Kan.; accompanied his regiment as adjutant in the Utah expedition of 1858, and remained in that territory until 1859, when he was ordered on recruiting service at Louisville, Ky. There he was married in November following to Mildred Ewing, of that city. When the crisis of 1861 arrived he promptly resigned, being, it is said, the first North Carolinian in the
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