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William Kelly (search for this): chapter 17
herton, Brock, Taylor and Vineyard. Nearly a mile north of Kelly's was McDonald's. From McDonald's to Lee & Gordon's mills (e former opposite Vineyard's house, and the latter opposite Kelly's. Hunt's (or Dalton's) ford came nearest Lee & Gordon's miions (Brannan's) to reconnoiter toward Reed's bridge. From Kelly's to Reed's bridge was about 2 1/2 miles. At Jay's mill, nea mile on either side of the road from Reed's bridge toward Kelly's. Early in the afternoon, Stewart's division in front of Vof logs and rails, and massing his army in line from beyond Kelly's to Vineyard's, a distance of 2 miles. Bragg gave his righvisions on the extreme left of Rosecrans' line, in front of Kelly's. This assault was repulsed. Fighting on the right througe and Chattanooga. The Federal left held the position at Kelly's until late in the afternoon, about 5 o'clock, when Generaer they could assist in a charge. About 5 p. m. Gracie and Kelly, from Preston's; McNair, with Culpeper's battery, from John
Samuel W. Ferguson (search for this): chapter 17
was widely separated and his wings were by road, 50 miles or more apart! Meanwhile Bragg was on the line of Chickamauga creek, with his left at Lafayette and his headquarters at Lee & Gordon's mills. General Gist's South Carolina brigade, with Ferguson's battery, was guarding his extreme left at Rome and supporting the cavalry in that quarter. Crittenden's corps at Ringgold and vicinity was at General Bragg's mercy. He was only 10 miles from Bragg's headquarters, with the Chickamauga betweender's bridge, General Gist was marching from Catoosa Station for the same point, having arrived from Rome with part of the Forty-sixth Georgia, the Twenty-fourth South Carolina and the Eighth Georgia battalion; the Sixteenth South Carolina and Ferguson's battery awaiting transportation at Rome, with the remainder of the Forty-sixth Georgia. General Gist had under his charge an ammunition train which delayed his march and prevented his leaving Catoosa before 10 p. m. on the 19th. After an a
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 17
gades of Hood's and Mc-Laws' divisions, and the artillery of those commands. Longstreet had only three brigades in battle on the 19th and five on the 20th, the artilotal of wing, 5 divisions, 16 brigades, 16 batteries. Left wing, Lieutenant-General Longstreet commanding. Buckner's corps, Major-General Buckner: Stewart's diion, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Johnson's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries. Longstreet's corps, Major-General Hood: McLaws' division, 2 brigades; Hood's division, 3's army the two divisions from Mississippi (Breckinridge's and Walker's), and Longstreet's five brigades and Buckner's troops, and estimating losses for both armies ues. Bragg gave his right to Lieutenant-General Polk and his left to Lieutenant-General Longstreet; the latter did not arrive until II p. m. on the 19th. Forrest wasr and Cheatham in rear and to the left of the latter. On the left, Lieutenant-General Longstreet's wing was organized from right to left as follows: Stewart (touchi
Joseph Brevard Kershaw (search for this): chapter 17
the divisions of McLaws, Hindman and Walker. Kershaw reached Alexander's bridge from Ringgold at mion present, Humphreys' and his own. While Kershaw was marching from Ringgold for Alexander's brr, Col. P. H. Colquitt, Forty-sixth Georgia. Kershaw marched his own and Humphreys' brigades to thhe took the direction of his three brigades. Kershaw attacked about 11:30 and Manigault shortly af a grand wheel to the right. In his advance Kershaw reached the Dyer house, almost in rear of Broattanooga road. Manigault reached a point on Kershaw's left and in line with his advance, the divisions of Preston, Hindman, Kershaw and Hood driving the Federal right to Snodgrass and drawing arouson from Hindman's, and Law from Hood's, with Kershaw's brigade, all directed by Kershaw, moved on nds some of the choicest spirits had fallen. Kershaw lost 488 killed and wounded; Manigault 539, I, Second regiment; both killed carrying General Kershaw's orders on the field. General Gist me[7 more...]
M. P. King (search for this): chapter 17
left and Helm in its front, were retiring. The gallant Helm had fallen and his brigade, supported on its left by Polk, was repulsed, after three attempts to storm King's regulars. In a few moments the Twenty-fourth South Carolina passed the angle in Baird's line unseen in the thick forest, and his artillery and infantry opened an enfilade from King's front. Promptly as the fire opened, Col. C. H. Stevens commanded the Twenty-fourth to change front to the left, and was instantly wounded and disabled, his horse being shot. Lieutenant-Colonel Capers executed the change of front and directed the fire of the Twenty-fourth in reply. The gallant adjutant of lion, and Rawlins Rivers, Company I, Second regiment; both killed carrying General Kershaw's orders on the field. General Gist mentioned Maj. B. B. Smith, Capt. M. P. King, and Lieuts. L. M. Butler and J. C. Habersham, of his staff, for efficiency and gallant conduct; Col. C. H. Stevens and Lieut.-Col. Ellison Capers, Twenty-fo
John M. Steedman (search for this): chapter 17
For an hour and a half the struggle continued with unabated fury. It terminated at sunset. The hill was not carried. It was held with splendid courage and was defended by all the forces of the center and right which could be rallied, and by Steedman's division of Granger's reserve corps; the whole put in position by General Thomas, now in command of the field, General Rosecrans having given up the battle as lost and gone to Chattanooga to arrange for the morrow. As soon as the Confederate right had driven the Federal left, Thomas began the retreat of the center behind his citadel on Snodgrass, and after night withdrew the divisions of Wood, Brannan and Steedman from the hill, and the great battle had been fought to its victorious end. The losses had been terrible on both sides. Among the Carolina commands some of the choicest spirits had fallen. Kershaw lost 488 killed and wounded; Manigault 539, and the Twenty-fourth South Carolina (Gist's brigade) 169; a total of 1,196.
tteries; Johnson's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries. Longstreet's corps, Major-General Hood: McLaws' division, 2 brigades; Hood's division, 3 brigades; Hindman's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries;'s wing was organized from right to left as follows: Stewart (touching Cleburne), Johnson, Hood, McLaws, Hindman and Preston. The line of the Confederate battle for most of its entire length was in td. The South Carolina brigades, Kershaw's, Manigault's and Gist's, were with the divisions of McLaws, Hindman and Walker. Kershaw reached Alexander's bridge from Ringgold at midnight and went into camp on the west bank at 1 a. m. on the 20th. General McLaws not having arrived, General Kershaw was in command of the two brigades of the division present, Humphreys' and his own. While Kershaw wing Manigault and Kershaw were in the thick of the fight. Kershaw commanded the two brigades of McLaws' division, and after General Hood was wounded, he took the direction of his three brigades. Ker
h of Lee & Gordon's mills. The Chattanooga road spoken of is the main road from LaFayette to Chattanooga, crossing the Chickamauga at Lee & Gordon's mills. Kelly's house was opposite Reed's bridge, and south of it, on the road, were the houses of Poe, Brotherton, Brock, Taylor and Vineyard. Nearly a mile north of Kelly's was McDonald's. From McDonald's to Lee & Gordon's mills (the road running nearly north and south) was about 4 miles. The crossings of the Chickamauga were by fords and twohout the morning failed to carry the Federal left. The battle progressed from right to left, the Confederate center and particularly the left being more successful. The Federal center and right were gradually driven until forced from the road at Poe's, Brothertor? Vineyard's. Rosecrans' line was bent first into a curve, and then broken into a right angle, the angle being about opposite the left of Polk's wing. The Federal right found a strong rest at Snodgrass hill, where Thomas, now comma
Franklin Gaillard (search for this): chapter 17
of the Third, were killed in the gallant performance of duty. Capt. D. R. Huger of General Manigault's staff fell in front of Snodgrass hill, and others of that gallant brigade sealed their devotion to duty with their heart's blood. In the report of General Kershaw, the following officers are mentioned for gallant and noteworthy conduct: Lieutenant-Colonel Bland and Major Hard of the Seventh; Captain Townsend of the Third battalion; Col. James D. Nance of the Third regiment; Lieut.-Col. Franklin Gaillard of the Second; Col. John W. Henagan of the Eighth, and Col. Joseph F. Gist of the Fifteenth; Capts. C. R. Holmes, H. L. Farley, and W. M. Dwight of the brigade staff, and Couriers M. F. Milam, Company A, Third battalion, and Rawlins Rivers, Company I, Second regiment; both killed carrying General Kershaw's orders on the field. General Gist mentioned Maj. B. B. Smith, Capt. M. P. King, and Lieuts. L. M. Butler and J. C. Habersham, of his staff, for efficiency and gallant conduc
. Corps of cavalry, Major-General Wheeler, operating on Bragg's left: Wharton's division, 2 brigades, 1 battery; Martin's division, 2 brigades, 1 battery. Corps of cavalry, Major-General Forrest, operating on Bragg's right: Armstrong's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries; Pegram's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries. Total of cavalry, 4 divisions, 8 brigades, 6 batteries. Rosecrans' army. Fourteenth corps, Major-General Thomas commanding: Baird's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Negley's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Brannan's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Reynolds' division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries. Twentieth corps, Major-General McCook commanding: Davis' division, 3 brigades, 5 batteries; Johnson's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Sheridan's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries. Twenty-first corps, Major-General Crittenden commanding: Wood's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Palmer's division, 3 brigades, 4 batteries; Van Cleve's division, 3 brigades, 3 b
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