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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Alexander H. Stephens (search for this): chapter 1
ights and interests of the South. Yet even at this stage there was a small minority who resolutely strove to stem the swelling tide. A speech was made by Alexander H. Stephens before the legislature, firmly opposing immediate disunion; while, on the other hand, Howell Cobb, in a letter apparently invincible in logic, demanded immediate secession. Herschel V. Johnson and Benjamin H. Hill stood by Stephens. The momentous news that the convention of South Carolina had adopted an ordinance of secession from the United States, telegraphed to the important cities and towns of Georgia on the afternoon of December 20, 1860, added impetus to the universal exci were some of the ablest men that Georgia has produced. Immediate secession was advocated by Thomas R. R. Cobb, Francis S. Bartow and Robert Toombs, while Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin H. Hill and Herschel V. Johnson used all their influence for delay until there could be a congress of the Southern States to take united action.
A. R. Lawton (search for this): chapter 1
litia, Governor Brown issued an order to Col. A. R. Lawton, commanding the First volunteer regimentt Savannah for the honor of this service. Colonel Lawton selected details from the Chatham artilleruarters without duress. The militia under Colonel Lawton immediately hoisted a State flag—a red lond occupied by Georgia troops, commanded by Colonel Lawton. I was received with great civility, and their possession. A day or two later, Col. A. R. Lawton, in command at Savannah, under instructie of Captain Whiting, refused to recognize Colonel Lawton's authority, or to allow Lieutenant Bassinon Captain Whiting's return, January 28th, Colonel Lawton addressed him the following letter: Sihich was unheeded, Governor Brown directed Colonel Lawton to order out sufficient military force andf New York who own them. Under this order Colonel Lawton, February 8th, put detachments of the Phoe Three more vessels were taken in hand by Colonel Lawton, two of which were advertised for sale, wh
Washington (search for this): chapter 1
munitions, guarded by a company of United States troops under command of Capt. Arnold Elzey, of Maryland. The occupation of this arsenal was necessary. The sentiment favoring the seizure was increased by the arrival, on January 10th, of an ordnance detachment, which had been ordered by Col. H. K. Craig, chief of ordnance at Washington, to report at that place after it had been ejected from the Charleston arsenal by the State authorities of South Carolina. Captain Elzey, in his report to Washington of the transfer, said: This movement on the part of Colonel Craig I believe to be wholly unauthorized by the war department. It was injudicious and impolitic, added much to the excitement in Augusta, and was very nigh producing serious difficulties in this quarter, the people believing it to be a reinforcement to my command. I had no previous knowledge of it whatever. On January 23d, Governor Brown, accompanied by his aide-de-camp, Hon. Henry R. Jackson, who had experienced mili
William H. C. Whiting (search for this): chapter 1
rongly manned, it would be impossible to reduce it with ordnance such as could soon be obtained by the State. Capt. William H. C. Whiting, of the United States army engineers, who had an office in Savannah at that time, was absent at Fort Clinch, ol as dainty additions to the rations of the soldiers, in which acceptable service they took pride. On January 6th Captain Whiting, a North Carolinian who afterward held the rank of major-general in the Confederate States service, having been notision of the Oglethorpe barracks, through Lieut. W. S. Bassinger. Ordnance-Sergeant Burt, in charge in the absence of Captain Whiting, refused to recognize Colonel Lawton's authority, or to allow Lieutenant Bassinger to interfere with the barracks orconsistently maintained his position by refusing to have any official communication with Lieutenant Bassinger. Upon Captain Whiting's return, January 28th, Colonel Lawton addressed him the following letter: Sir: I am instructed by the governor
Thomas Reed Rootes Cobb (search for this): chapter 1
, asking if he would sanction the movement of Georgia volunteers going to the aid of South Carolina; but this generous impulse was very properly checked, pending the action of the State convention. By act of the legislature, a sovereign convention had been summoned to meet at Milledgeville on January 6, 1861, to decide upon the action to be taken by the State of Georgia. Among the delegates were some of the ablest men that Georgia has produced. Immediate secession was advocated by Thomas R. R. Cobb, Francis S. Bartow and Robert Toombs, while Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin H. Hill and Herschel V. Johnson used all their influence for delay until there could be a congress of the Southern States to take united action. But all parties pledged Georgia to resist any effort at coercion of a sovereign State. On the 9th of January, 1861, the ordinance of secession was adopted, and the president of the convention, ex-Gov. George W. Crawford, briefly and impressively announced that the S
Henry Rootes Jackson (search for this): chapter 1
it to be a reinforcement to my command. I had no previous knowledge of it whatever. On January 23d, Governor Brown, accompanied by his aide-de-camp, Hon. Henry R. Jackson, who had experienced military life as a colonel of a Georgia regiment in Mexico, and Col. William Phillips, visited Captain Elzey and made a verbal requestt. I am further instructed to say that an answer will be expected by to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Henry R. Jackson, Aide-de-Camp, etc. About 1 o'clock on the night of the 23d of January, I received from the war department the following reply to my telegram: Capt. Aherefore directed my adjutant to address and convey the following note in reply to the governor's demand: Headquarters Augusta Arsenal, January 24, 1861. Col. H. R. Jackson, Aide-de-Camp: Sir: I have the honor to inform you that I am directed by Captain Elzey, commanding this post, to say, in reply to the demands of the gove
George W. Crawford (search for this): chapter 1
has produced. Immediate secession was advocated by Thomas R. R. Cobb, Francis S. Bartow and Robert Toombs, while Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin H. Hill and Herschel V. Johnson used all their influence for delay until there could be a congress of the Southern States to take united action. But all parties pledged Georgia to resist any effort at coercion of a sovereign State. On the 9th of January, 1861, the ordinance of secession was adopted, and the president of the convention, ex-Gov. George W. Crawford, briefly and impressively announced that the State of Georgia was now free, sovereign and independent. As soon as the result was announced to the great throng assembled outside, the people applauded, the cannon thundered a salute, and that night Milledgeville was brilliantly illuminated. Similar demonstrations occurred in all the large towns and cities of the State. Having resumed its original position as a sovereign, independent republic, Georgia began preparing for the maint
William J. Hardee (search for this): chapter 1
been completed when active hostilities began, and the companies formed were consolidated in one regiment, and turned over to the Confederate States government with the title of the First regiment Georgia regulars. Of this regiment, Charles J. Williams was commissioned colonel, March 5, 1861. The First regulars served for some time in Virginia in Toombs', then in Gen. George T. Ander-son's brigade, and after Fredericksburg, were on duty most of the time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The first colonel of the regiment, C. J. Williams, died in the early part of 1862.
John W. Anderson (search for this): chapter 1
he sectional party that, after the 4th of March, 1861, would hold the reins of government. The legislature met early in November, 1860. Influenced by apprehension of impending peril, Gov. Joseph E. Brown recommended that it should authorize commercial reprisal to meet the nullification by Northern States of the national fugitive slave law; the calling of a convention of the people, and the appropriation of $1,000,000 for defense. A convention of military companies, presided over by John W. Anderson, assembled at Milledgeville, November 10, 1860, and adopted a resolution to the effect that, Georgia can no longer remain in the Union consistently with her safety and best interest. This convention of soldiers also favored the appropriation of $1,000,000 for military purposes recommended by the governor, and supported their action by the tender of their services. The legislature also promptly responded to the governor's recommendations by creating the office of adjutant-general of t
f the sovereign people to determine upon the mode, measure and time of such resistance. Notwithstanding these warlike preparations, there was in many sections of the State a strong sentiment against disunion. The vote for presidential candidates in Georgia is a fair criterion of the sentiment in the State prior to the election of Mr. Lincoln. There were three electoral tickets: One for Breckinridge and Lane, one for Bell and Everett, one for Douglas and Johnson, but none for Lincoln and Hamlin. The vote stood as follows: Breckinridge and Lane, 51,893; Bell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronounced Southern rights men, the vote in Georgia showed a small majority against immediate secession by separate State action. But the election of Mr. Lincoln by a purely sectional vote set the current toward secession, causing the tide of disunion sentiment to rise with steadily increasing volume, and strengthening the vie
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