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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Edward Smith (search for this): chapter 1
o retain possession of the fort until the relations of Georgia and the Federal government should be determined. Having telegraphed advices of what he had done to the governors of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, Governor Brown soon had the satisfaction of receiving the endorsement of similar action on their part. On the day following the occupation of Fort Pulaski, the officers of the volunteer companies of Macon, Capts. R. A. Smith, E. Fitzgerald, T. M. Parker, L. M. Lamar, E. Smith and Lieut. W. H. Ross, telegraphed the governor, asking if he would sanction the movement of Georgia volunteers going to the aid of South Carolina; but this generous impulse was very properly checked, pending the action of the State convention. By act of the legislature, a sovereign convention had been summoned to meet at Milledgeville on January 6, 1861, to decide upon the action to be taken by the State of Georgia. Among the delegates were some of the ablest men that Georgia has produ
C. A. Greiner (search for this): chapter 1
f ordering an immediate occupation. The earnest spirit of the citizens of Savannah was manifested on the night of January 1st, by a number of persons dressed in citizens' clothes but armed with muskets and revolvers, who boarded the revenue cutter J. C. Dobbin and announced that they had come in force, largely outnumbering the crew, to take the vessel in the name of Georgia. The commander surrendered promptly and the Palmetto flag was raised and saluted. The leader in this affair was C. A. Greiner, who went north later, and was arrested at Philadelphia, April 29th, on the charge of having committed treason in this act and in participating in the seizure of Fort Pulaski. On January 2, 1861, as commander-in-chief of the Georgia militia, Governor Brown issued an order to Col. A. R. Lawton, commanding the First volunteer regiment of Georgia, at Savannah, which opens with these words, deserving quotation as ably stating the reasons and justification for the occupation of Fort Pulask
William H. Ross (search for this): chapter 1
n of the fort until the relations of Georgia and the Federal government should be determined. Having telegraphed advices of what he had done to the governors of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, Governor Brown soon had the satisfaction of receiving the endorsement of similar action on their part. On the day following the occupation of Fort Pulaski, the officers of the volunteer companies of Macon, Capts. R. A. Smith, E. Fitzgerald, T. M. Parker, L. M. Lamar, E. Smith and Lieut. W. H. Ross, telegraphed the governor, asking if he would sanction the movement of Georgia volunteers going to the aid of South Carolina; but this generous impulse was very properly checked, pending the action of the State convention. By act of the legislature, a sovereign convention had been summoned to meet at Milledgeville on January 6, 1861, to decide upon the action to be taken by the State of Georgia. Among the delegates were some of the ablest men that Georgia has produced. Immediate s
H. R. Jackson (search for this): chapter 1
In the conference which fixed the terms of the withdrawal, the governor was accompanied by Generals Williams and Harris, Col. W. H. T. Walker, and his aides, Colonels Jackson and Phil. lips, all of whom joined the governor in assurances of their esteem of Captain Elzey, and a desire that the unhappy difficulties which had arisend action on the field of First Manassas won for him the rank of brigadier-general and the title of the Blucher of the day from the lips of President Davis. Under Jackson he achieved additional renown and was promoted major-general, but wounds received before Richmond in 1862 deprived the cause of his further active service in the guns the stars and stripes fluttered down the garrison staff, and none of the officers observed this with exultation, but rather with sorrow that it must be. Colonel Jackson offered this toast, as they gathered before parting: The flag of stars and stripes—may it never be disgraced, while it floats over a true Southern patriot. A
J. Pembroke Jones (search for this): chapter 1
I have the honor to inform you that I am directed by Captain Elzey, commanding this post, to say, in reply to the demands of the governor of Georgia, made through you yesterday, requesting him to withdraw his command beyond the limits of the State, he begs to request an interview with his excellency the governor, for the purpose of negotiating honorable terms of surrender at as early an hour this morning as practicable. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. P. Jones, Lieutenant Second Artillery, Post Adjutant. About 10 o'clock of the same morning the governor, accompanied by his staff and Brigadier-General Harris, commanding the troops, rode up to my quarters, and were received by me, when the following honorable terms were agreed upon and executed: His excellency the governor of Georgia, having demanded the United States arsenal at Augusta, commanded by Capt. Arnold Elzey, Second artillery, United States army, the following terms are agreed
Joseph E. Brown (search for this): chapter 1
fluenced by apprehension of impending peril, Gov. Joseph E. Brown recommended that it should authorize commerc fort and the supply of ammunition was meager. Governor Brown, being advised of the situation at Savannah, an, as commander-in-chief of the Georgia militia, Governor Brown issued an order to Col. A. R. Lawton, commandinof Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, Governor Brown soon had the satisfaction of receiving the endos knowledge of it whatever. On January 23d, Governor Brown, accompanied by his aide-de-camp, Hon. Henry R.tment, to wit: Sir: I am instructed by his excellency Governor Brown to say to you that, Georgia having seceded State by water, to New York, via Savannah. Joseph E. Brown, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Army oAfter a sharp remonstrance, which was unheeded, Governor Brown directed Colonel Lawton to order out sufficient with the Confederate States, and the fact that Governor Brown retained the matter in his own hands is a strik
W. H. T. Walker (search for this): chapter 1
es army engineers, who had an office in Savannah at that time, was absent at Fort Clinch, on the St. Mary's, and Ordnance-Sergeant Walker with a fort keeper was in charge at the works; only twenty guns were in the fort and the supply of ammunition wae public property, both ordnance and engineer, which I have given as existing January 1st. . . . I have directed Ordnance-Sergeant Walker to report at Oglethorpe barracks until further orders. The fort keeper I have discharged. . . . . It is necessaem of Captain Elzey, and a desire that the unhappy difficulties which had arisen might be adjusted without hostilities. Walker, a comrade of Elzey in the Federal service, seized the latter's hand and assured him that he had done all that could be rnly reply by silently throwing his arm around his comrade, while tears filled the eyes of those who witnessed the scene. Walker began here an honorable career in the Confederate cause, became a major-general, was distinguished for his reckless darin
Herschel V. Johnson (search for this): chapter 1
ncoln. There were three electoral tickets: One for Breckinridge and Lane, one for Bell and Everett, one for Douglas and Johnson, but none for Lincoln and Hamlin. The vote stood as follows: Breckinridge and Lane, 51,893; Bell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronounced Southern rights men, the vote in Georgia showed a small majority against immediate secession by separate State action. But the election of Mr. Lincoln by a p while, on the other hand, Howell Cobb, in a letter apparently invincible in logic, demanded immediate secession. Herschel V. Johnson and Benjamin H. Hill stood by Stephens. The momentous news that the convention of South Carolina had adopted ancated by Thomas R. R. Cobb, Francis S. Bartow and Robert Toombs, while Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin H. Hill and Herschel V. Johnson used all their influence for delay until there could be a congress of the Southern States to take united action.
W. S. Everett (search for this): chapter 1
iment against disunion. The vote for presidential candidates in Georgia is a fair criterion of the sentiment in the State prior to the election of Mr. Lincoln. There were three electoral tickets: One for Breckinridge and Lane, one for Bell and Everett, one for Douglas and Johnson, but none for Lincoln and Hamlin. The vote stood as follows: Breckinridge and Lane, 51,893; Bell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronounced SouthEverett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronounced Southern rights men, the vote in Georgia showed a small majority against immediate secession by separate State action. But the election of Mr. Lincoln by a purely sectional vote set the current toward secession, causing the tide of disunion sentiment to rise with steadily increasing volume, and strengthening the views and fears of those who could see relief only by withdrawing from a union which had fallen under the control of a party favoring a policy so antagonistic to the rights and interests o
Henry R. Jackson (search for this): chapter 1
solated from land approach and nearer the open sea, reinforcements and provisions might be expected and resistance made to the demand of the State for the relinquishment of its territory. On the Georgia coast there were two United States forts, Jackson and Pulaski, near Savannah. One of these, Fort Pulaski, was situated (similarly to Sumter) at the mouth of the Savannah river, on Tybee Roads. It could be supplied with troops and munitions from the sea with little risk, and once properly manndnance-Sergeant Walker with a fort keeper was in charge at the works; only twenty guns were in the fort and the supply of ammunition was meager. Governor Brown, being advised of the situation at Savannah, and of the probability that Pulaski and Jackson would be seized by the people, visited the city, and after consultation with the citizens took the appropriate step of ordering an immediate occupation. The earnest spirit of the citizens of Savannah was manifested on the night of January 1st,
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