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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
irby Smith naval affairs depredations in the coast region war Legislation Chickasaw Bayou and Murfreesboro. Georgia appears with credit at the famous battle of Shiloh April 6 and 7, 1862, by two commands, the Washington Light Artillery, Capt. Isadore P. Girardey, and the Mountain Dragoons, Capt. I. W. Avery; and among the general officers, by Maj.-Gen. William J. Hardee, commander of the Third corps, and Brig.-Gen. J. K. Jackson of Withers' division. Girardey's battery, attached to Jackson's brigade, took a conspicuous part in the struggle of both days, and suffered severe loss. In the Sunday fight, Lieut. J. J. Jacobus fell mortally wounded while gallantly commanding his section, and Lieut. C. Spaeth was seriously hurt. Gunner A. Roesel was killed, and Privates John Halbert, J. T. Nethercutt, Thomas J. Murphy and S. A. Ingalls were wounded. Coporal Hughes captured a banner, and Private Hill a marker's flag. Corp. J. VanDohlan was commended for conspicuous gallantry. The
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
the Confederate steamer General Lee came down from Savannah under flag of truce, carrying a lady and her son w following day the boat and crew were sent back to Savannah, with a message from Hunter that the presence of t the armed cruiser Nashville ran the blockade into Savannah with a cargo of arms. This vessel was the first coff in boats and made their escape up the river to Savannah, though pursued for some distance by boats from Fory Georgia was constructed, to which the ladies of Savannah made large contributions. The Fingal, whose lengtr, and brought several monitors to the vicinity of Savannah. During the fall of 1862 only a small force was lhe Georgia troops to occasionally skirmish between Savannah and Port Royal. Notable among these encounters wa to General Mercer to finish the fortifications at Savannah. The governor's message in November described t city. It was further patriotically resolved that Savannah should never be surrendered, but defended, street
Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ny D, Georgia regulars, Captain Read; Savannah river batteries, Lieut.-Col. Edward C. Anderson; Fort Jackson, Capt. John W. Anderson; Irish Jasper Greens, Company B, Captain O'Connor; Liberty Guards, Captain Hughes; Tattnall Guards, Captain Davenport. A negro regiment that had been organized by General Hunter was called the First South Carolina volunteers (colored), and in November a company of it was employed on an expedition up the rivers and lagoons of Georgia between St. Simon's and Fernandina. This was led by Col. O. T. Beard of New York, Rev. Mansfield French, chaplain, and Charles T. Trowbridge, captain. The expedition made thirteen different landings, had skirmishes at King's bay and Spaulding's, and destroyed nine salt works, together with $20,000 worth of horses, salt, corn, rice, etc., which could not be carried away. Gen. R. Saxton reported that the negroes fought bravely, and he recommended that a number of light-draught steamers should be sent up the Georgia stream
Bridgeport, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
unlop and Major Harper, made a gallant charge almost to the mouth of the cannon. After fighting them in front two or three hours I took immediate command of this force and charged the rear of the enemy into their camps and burned their camps and stores, demoralizing their force and weakening their strength. In the following month Colonel Morrison was sent with his troops into Kentucky to occupy Mount Vernon, and at Big Hill he defeated an attack of Federal cavalry, August 23d. At Bridgeport, Ala., August 27th, the Jackson artillery, under Capt. G. A. Dure, did brilliant work, Lieutenant Holtzclaw, as well as the captain, winning the commendatory notice of General Maxey, the officer in command. The Third Georgia cavalry, Col. Martin J. Crawford, accompanied Gen. Joseph Wheeler in Bragg's Kentucky campaign, and fought gallantly and suffered severely at Munfordville; but at New Haven, Ky., September 29th, Colonel Crawford and about 250 of his command were surprised and captured by
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
esired to go north. The Lee was ordered to anchor, and upon her failure to do so was fired upon by Fort Pulaski, but without effect. A small armed steamer was sent after her, and she was brought back to the fort. General Hunter ordered from Hilton Head, Put the officers and crew of the rebel steamer in close confinement in the fort. On the following day the boat and crew were sent back to Savannah, with a message from Hunter that the presence of three officers on the Lee was a suspicious ciemainder of 1862, the Federals manifested great apprehension regarding her, and brought several monitors to the vicinity of Savannah. During the fall of 1862 only a small force was left by the enemy at Fort Pulaski, the main strength being at Hilton Head. This disposition made it necessary for the Georgia troops to occasionally skirmish between Savannah and Port Royal. Notable among these encounters was one October 22d at Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie, in which Col. G. P. Harrison was in comm
Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
gence remembered the horrors of the servile insurrection in San Domingo. The conduct of their enemies during and immediately after the war proves that the Southern people were not mistaken as to the ultimate aim of the party that came into control of the government in 1860, even admitting that they made a mistake in the remedy adopted. In November, on account of the depredations of Colonel Higginson's negro regiment, the governor notified the legislature that Col. Henry Floyd, commanding Camden militia, had asked leave to call out his forces for home defense, and he requested the legislature to decide if he had authority under the conscript act to make such a call. A spirited discussion of several days resulted, in which it appeared that the majority of the body regarded the conscript law as unconstitutional, but no definite action was taken. The legislature did, however, authorize the governor to obstruct the navigable streams and to hire or impress slaves to perform the necessa
Bluffton (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
predicted result followed, and I never departed from it, however slightly, without finding reason for subsequent regret. Further said the colonel: No officer in this regiment now doubts that the key to the successful prosecution of this war lies in the unlimited employment of black troops. On September 30th a reconnaissance was made by several New York companies up the May river from Fort Pulaski, which resulted in the destruction of some valuable salt works at Crowell's plantation, above Bluffton. Colonel Barton, commanding, reported that he stopped at the latter place on his return and carried off a considerable quantity of furniture from the deserted houses, which he asked permission to retain for the use of his officers and himself. These barbarous raids were made for private and public plunder. To destroy public stores is admissible in war, but to loot private houses and seize private furniture were a disgrace to the troops who were guilty of such outrages, and a still gre
Saint Marys River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Doboy river, and a sawmill was raided and the lumber, saws, etc., were carried away. Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, of Boston, commander of this negro regiment, led it in another expedition early in 1863, on board three steamers. On the St. Mary's river they were attacked by a daring body of Confederate cavalry. Higginson reported that though fearful of our shot and shell, they were so daring against musketry, that one rebel sprang from the shore upon the large boat which was towed at our sheep, horses, steers, agricultural implements, and 40,000 large-sized bricks. The real conductor of the whole expedition up the St. Mary's, Colonel Higginson went on to say, was Corp. Robert Sutton, of Company G, formerly a slave upon the St. Mary's river. In every instance when I followed his advice the predicted result followed, and I never departed from it, however slightly, without finding reason for subsequent regret. Further said the colonel: No officer in this regiment now doubts that
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
crew were sent back to Savannah, with a message from Hunter that the presence of three officers on the Lee was a suspicious circumstance, and that hereafter only one officer should accompany a flag of truce. In July, 1862, the armed cruiser Nashville ran the blockade into Savannah with a cargo of arms. This vessel was the first commissioned armed cruiser of the Confederate States, and had been purchased with the original intention of using her to convey abroad the commissioners, Mason and and house by house, until, if taken, the victor's spoils should be alone a heap of ashes. The military history of the West for 1862 closes with two famous battles, almost simultaneous—one on the Vicksburg line of defenses, the other between Nashville and Chattanooga. At Chickasaw bayou, a brigade of Georgians, organized in east Tennessee under Gen. Seth M. Barton, and thence transferred to Mississippi to meet the invasions under Grant and Sherman, took a conspicuous part in the defeat of
Jekyl Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
another expedition early in 1863, on board three steamers. On the St. Mary's river they were attacked by a daring body of Confederate cavalry. Higginson reported that though fearful of our shot and shell, they were so daring against musketry, that one rebel sprang from the shore upon the large boat which was towed at our stern, where he was shot down by one of my sergeants. Colonel Higginson was on a collecting expedition, and picked up 2500 bars of railroad iron from St. Simon's and Jekyll islands, from abandoned Confederate forts, some valuable yellow pine lumber, rice, resin, cordage, oars, a flock of sheep, horses, steers, agricultural implements, and 40,000 large-sized bricks. The real conductor of the whole expedition up the St. Mary's, Colonel Higginson went on to say, was Corp. Robert Sutton, of Company G, formerly a slave upon the St. Mary's river. In every instance when I followed his advice the predicted result followed, and I never departed from it, however slightly, w
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