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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Pocotaligo (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
from her. Notwithstanding the inaction of the vessel during the remainder of 1862, the Federals manifested great apprehension regarding her, and brought several monitors to the vicinity of Savannah. During the fall of 1862 only a small force was left by the enemy at Fort Pulaski, the main strength being at Hilton Head. This disposition made it necessary for the Georgia troops to occasionally skirmish between Savannah and Port Royal. Notable among these encounters was one October 22d at Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie, in which Col. G. P. Harrison was in command of the troops sent from Georgia. This was a considerable affair and a decisive victory for the Confederates. Brig.-Gen. Hugh W. Mercer had succeeded to the command of the district of Georgia upon the transfer of General Lawton to Virginia, and on September 24th General Beauregard assumed command of the department of South Carolina and Georgia, to which Florida was soon added. Gen. Howell Cobb, after the battle of Sharpsbur
Coosawhatchie, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
hstanding the inaction of the vessel during the remainder of 1862, the Federals manifested great apprehension regarding her, and brought several monitors to the vicinity of Savannah. During the fall of 1862 only a small force was left by the enemy at Fort Pulaski, the main strength being at Hilton Head. This disposition made it necessary for the Georgia troops to occasionally skirmish between Savannah and Port Royal. Notable among these encounters was one October 22d at Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie, in which Col. G. P. Harrison was in command of the troops sent from Georgia. This was a considerable affair and a decisive victory for the Confederates. Brig.-Gen. Hugh W. Mercer had succeeded to the command of the district of Georgia upon the transfer of General Lawton to Virginia, and on September 24th General Beauregard assumed command of the department of South Carolina and Georgia, to which Florida was soon added. Gen. Howell Cobb, after the battle of Sharpsburg, was assigned
Mud River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
sland. The crew got off in boats and made their escape up the river to Savannah, though pursued for some distance by boats from Fort Pulaski. Before leaving the vessel the crew set her on fire, and she was totally consumed. It was thought by the Federals that her intention was to go to sea by a route which was known to be practicable, namely, after running under the fire of the fort a short distance, to enter Wright river, and thence through Wall's cut and other narrow channels, or down Mud river and entering Wright river entirely out of range of the fort. If the Emma had gone her length farther to the right at the fatal moment, she could have gone to sea without approaching nearer than five miles to the battery at martello tower. The famous ship Fingal, whose adventures in 1861 have been narrated, having become unavailable as a cruiser on account of the blockade, was converted into an ironclad, of the familiar Confederate type, known as the Atlanta. John A. Tift had charge o
Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s themselves Kentuckians going to join the Southern army. Thus Andrews and his men subjected themselves to being treated as spies. The object of the foolhardy scheme was to break up railroad communication south of Chattanooga, so that Buell might capture that point from the west and north. Andrews with nineteen of the men reached the rendezvous in time. Buying their tickets to various points as regular passengers, they boarded the northward bound mail train. At Big Shanty, now known as Kenesaw, while the train stopped for breakfast, Andrews and his men hurried forward and uncoupled a section of the train, consisting of three empty box cars connected with the engine, which they at once managed by two experienced men detailed for that purpose. The engine pulled off rapidly and was gone before the sentinels standing near suspected the movement. William A. Fuller, conductor of the train, and Anthony Murphy, foreman of the Atlanta machine shops, who happened to be on the train, at
Frank Stone (search for this): chapter 5
eneral Barton estimated the Federal dead in their front at 650. The punishment of the Federals was appalling to them, and served to postpone the fall of Vicksburg for half a year. In his official report General Barton mentioned with praise the services of Cols. Abda Johnson (wounded), Henderson and Phillips, Lieutenant-Colonel Bell (wounded), and Maj. Henry C. Kellogg, of the same regiment, and Capts. T. B. Lyons and Patterson of his staff. In the sanguinary struggle at Murfreesboro, or Stone's river, December 31st to January 2d, Gen. John K. Jackson's brigade, of Breckinridge's division, which included the Fifth regiment of infantry and the Second Georgia battalion of sharpshooters, was in various parts of the field at different stages of the battle, but experienced all its severe loss in the brief space from noon to three in the afternoon of December 31st, when it was sent by Breckinridge to join in the assault upon the Federal center. Jackson twice charged the enemy's strong
Jack Brown (search for this): chapter 5
C. Wilson; Thirtieth regiment. Col. D. J. Bailey; Thirty-second regiment, Col. G. P. Harrison; Fortyenth regiment, Col. G. W. M. Williams; Fiftieth regiment, Col. W. R. Manning; Fifty-fourth regiment, Col. C. H. Way; Fifty-ninth, regiment, Col. Jack Brown; Georgia Guards, Major Screven; DeKalb Rifles, Captain Hartridge; Second battalion cavalry, Companies D, B, E, Lieutenant-Colonel Bird; cavalry south of the Altamaha (Fourth regiment), Lieutenant-Colonel Clinch; Effingham Hussars, Captain Stnth. The Confederate Congress had passed an additional conscription act, extending its scope to men between thirty-five and forty-five years of age, and compelling the recruiting of existing organizations until filled to the maximum number. Governor Brown had notified the President a few weeks before the meeting of the legislature that he would not permit enrollment under this new law until that body met and acted on the subject. The much-debated question of the constitutionality of the consc
G. W. M. Williams (search for this): chapter 5
nd James F. Bozeman, sunk obstructions in the Appalachicola to prevent a river invasion and protect the gunboat Chattahoochee, then in construction. In July, 1863, the following organizations were included in General Mercer's command, in the district of Georgia: Eighth battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Reid; Tenth battalion, Major Rylander; Twenty-fifth regiment, Col. C. C. Wilson; Thirtieth regiment. Col. D. J. Bailey; Thirty-second regiment, Col. G. P. Harrison; Fortyenth regiment, Col. G. W. M. Williams; Fiftieth regiment, Col. W. R. Manning; Fifty-fourth regiment, Col. C. H. Way; Fifty-ninth, regiment, Col. Jack Brown; Georgia Guards, Major Screven; DeKalb Rifles, Captain Hartridge; Second battalion cavalry, Companies D, B, E, Lieutenant-Colonel Bird; cavalry south of the Altamaha (Fourth regiment), Lieutenant-Colonel Clinch; Effingham Hussars, Captain Strobhar; Harwick Mounted Rifles, Captain McAllister; Lamar rangers, Captain Brailsford; Liberty Independent troop, Captain Walthou
W. R. Manning (search for this): chapter 5
the Appalachicola to prevent a river invasion and protect the gunboat Chattahoochee, then in construction. In July, 1863, the following organizations were included in General Mercer's command, in the district of Georgia: Eighth battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Reid; Tenth battalion, Major Rylander; Twenty-fifth regiment, Col. C. C. Wilson; Thirtieth regiment. Col. D. J. Bailey; Thirty-second regiment, Col. G. P. Harrison; Fortyenth regiment, Col. G. W. M. Williams; Fiftieth regiment, Col. W. R. Manning; Fifty-fourth regiment, Col. C. H. Way; Fifty-ninth, regiment, Col. Jack Brown; Georgia Guards, Major Screven; DeKalb Rifles, Captain Hartridge; Second battalion cavalry, Companies D, B, E, Lieutenant-Colonel Bird; cavalry south of the Altamaha (Fourth regiment), Lieutenant-Colonel Clinch; Effingham Hussars, Captain Strobhar; Harwick Mounted Rifles, Captain McAllister; Lamar rangers, Captain Brailsford; Liberty Independent troop, Captain Walthour; McIntosh cavalry, Captain Hopkins; Par
Hiram P. Bell (search for this): chapter 5
nspicuous part in the defeat of Sherman by the Confederate forces under the command of Gen. Stephen D. Lee. This brigade was composed of the Fortieth regiment, Col. Abda Johnson; the Forty-second, Col. R. J. Henderson; the Forty-third, Lieut.-Col. Hiram P. Bell, and the Fifty-second, Col. C. D. Phillips. The brigade took position at the Indian mound, covering one of the bayou fords which the enemy attempted to cross in their endeavor to pierce the Confederate line, and on the 28th of Decemberhment of the Federals was appalling to them, and served to postpone the fall of Vicksburg for half a year. In his official report General Barton mentioned with praise the services of Cols. Abda Johnson (wounded), Henderson and Phillips, Lieutenant-Colonel Bell (wounded), and Maj. Henry C. Kellogg, of the same regiment, and Capts. T. B. Lyons and Patterson of his staff. In the sanguinary struggle at Murfreesboro, or Stone's river, December 31st to January 2d, Gen. John K. Jackson's brigade,
David Hunter (search for this): chapter 5
of the Forty-eighth New York, Col. W. B. Barton; a company of Rhode Island artillery, and a detachment of engineers. General Hunter had ordered in May that in consequence of an alleged violation of flag of truce by a Confederate command, all partiey Fort Pulaski, but without effect. A small armed steamer was sent after her, and she was brought back to the fort. General Hunter ordered from Hilton Head, Put the officers and crew of the rebel steamer in close confinement in the fort. On the following day the boat and crew were sent back to Savannah, with a message from Hunter that the presence of three officers on the Lee was a suspicious circumstance, and that hereafter only one officer should accompany a flag of truce. In July, 1862,r; Liberty Guards, Captain Hughes; Tattnall Guards, Captain Davenport. A negro regiment that had been organized by General Hunter was called the First South Carolina volunteers (colored), and in November a company of it was employed on an expediti
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