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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Ridge, in the Atlanta campaign; then went to Savannah in Hardee's command. In the spring of 1865 ied at Jacksboro, Tenn.), and being ordered to Savannah was united with the Thirteenth infantry (Phoeampaign of 1864, especially in the defense of Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea. The Firce of this regiment was chiefly in defense of Savannah in the latter part of 1864. The Fifth Geor Appomattox. A part of this battalion was at Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea and the siethe Georgia coast; assisted in the defense of Savannah in December, 1864; also served for a time in eneral Hardee attempted to defend the city of Savannah in December, 1864. The Thompson Artillery,ast, and was engaged in the operations around Savannah in December, 1864. The Macon Light Artillergia coast and participated in the defense of Savannah under Hardee in December, 1864. The same is son disabled by a wound. During the siege of Savannah in December, 1864, this regiment, commanded b[9 more...]
Jacksboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
H. Allen, (B) James T. Buckner, (C) E. J. Craven, (D) E. H. Harrison, (E) Thad. Oliver, (F) John H. Losser, (G) D. N. Martin, (H) H. H. Scranton, (I) C. W. Howard, (K) William J. Dixon. Captain Allen soon became major. This regiment was formed in December, 1862, in the following manner: The Oglethorpe artillery, which had been the Oglethorpe infantry, Company D, of Ramsey's First Georgia, was detached from the Twelfth Georgia battalion of artillery (acting as infantry and stationed at Jacksboro, Tenn.), and being ordered to Savannah was united with the Thirteenth infantry (Phoenix) battalion, which had been serving on the Georgia coast from the beginning of the war; to these, other detached companies were added, and the new regiment thus formed was called the Sixty-third Georgia. The regiment served as infantry and heavy artillery at Thunderbolt and Rosedew island, and two of its companies (B and K) at Battery Wagner near Charleston, in 1863. In May, 1864, it was ordered to Dalton.
Perryville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
iam E. Curtis, lieutenant-colonel; John Knight, major; E. Elless, adjutant, and A. D. Abraham, quartermaster. The captains were: J. E. Stallings (A), George N. Lester (B), George S. Avery (C), John W. Powell (D), J. C. Cartwright (E), S. D. Clements (F), Washington Henibree (G), Newton J. Ross (H), W. B. Thomason (I), J. J. Bowen (K). This regiment was assigned to the army of Tennessee; was for a time in north Mississippi; went with Bragg into Kentucky, and was especially distinguished at Perryville, where it had two color-bearers killed and four wounded, and where its gallant colonel, McDaniel, fell late in the evening mortally wounded. It went with Stevenson's division to Mississippi, where it participated in the battles of the Vicksburg campaign, and was included in the surrender of that important post. It was exchanged in time to take part in the battle of Missionary Ridge; was in the Atlanta and Tennessee campaigns of 1864, and in 1865, being consolidated with the Fortieth and
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
at Appomattox, being engaged in all the great conflicts of the army of Northern Virginia, in the campaigns around Richmond, in northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, and afterward helping to baffle the desperate efforts and overwhelming resources of Grant for nearly a year. The successors to those holding office at its ore renown it participated in the great campaigns which, beginning with the battles around Richmond, were continued through three years in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, until they closed at Appomattox in a defeat which was decisive and final, and yet as glorious to the vanquished as to the victors. In the changes that occurrompany C, was made major. The battalion was distinguished in all the campaigns of the army of Northern Virginia, around Richmond, in north Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and the campaign against Grant, closing with Appomattox. The Twelfth Georgia battalion of artillery had the following officers: Lieut.-Col. H. D. Capers, M
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ge Johnson were engaged in an affair on Stono river near Charleston, in which a Federal gunboat which had ventured past the Confederate batteries was cut off and forced to surrender. In May, 1863, the battalion went with Gist's brigade to Jackson, Miss., to reinforce Gen. J. E. Johnston, who was gathering an army with which to attempt the relief of Vicksburg. After the campaign in north Mississippi, the battalion participated in the campaigns of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta and Nashville, and in the spring of 1865, after being consolidated with the Second battalion sharpshooters and the Sixty-fifth regiment, it served in the Carolinas, surrendering with Johnston at Goldsboro. The following officers succeeded those first named: Lieut.-Cols. A. Littlefield, Leroy Napier and Z. L. Watters, the last named commanding Gist's brigade at the battle of Nashville; Capts. (D) J. A. Hardin, (E) John A. Penn, (F) J. W. Boaz. The Ninth battalion Georgia volunteers had at first the f
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
as engaged in the campaigns of the Peninsula, Seven Days before Richmond, Northern Virginia and Maryland, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and in theinth served in Virginia through the Peninsular and Richmond campaigns, in northern Virginia and Maryland, at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and in Sixth cavalry. The Thomas Georgia legion served in east Tennessee and southwest Virginia. Wright's Georgia legion had the following field officers: Col. A. R. rved in that department, being part of the time in southeast Kentucky and southwest Virginia. It was in the campaign around Chattanooga in September and October, 186and with Longstreet in the Knoxville campaign. A portion of it served in southwest Virginia in 1864, and a part of the battalion did duty in the defense of Richmond imes called the First partisan rangers, served in east Tennessee, then in southwest Virginia, during the greater part of the war. A portion of the battalion was with
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
irginia in the spring of 1862. It was engaged in the campaigns of the Peninsula, Seven Days before Richmond, Northern Virginia and Maryland, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and in the long continued campaign against Grant from the spring of 1864 to the closing scene at Appomattox, April 9, 1865. The successors t(K) H. H. Whitfield. The Forty-ninth served in Virginia through the Peninsular and Richmond campaigns, in northern Virginia and Maryland, at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and in the campaign of 1864-65, being still at the post of duty in the last days at Petersburg and in the final scene at Appomattox. Officerarticipated in all the campaigns of the army of Northern Virginia from Seven Pines and the battles around Richmond to Sharpsburg; then in the Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg campaigns, and in the continuous battles of the campaigns of 1864-65, from the Wilderness to Appomattox, suffering, like all the regiments of
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Alliston were killed in action. The Forty-fifth regiment Georgia volunteers had at first the following field officers: Col. Thomas Hardeman, Lieut.-Col. T. J. Simmons, Maj. W. L. Grice, Adjt. George F. Cherry. The captains were: (A) M. R. Rogers, (B) J. W. Dozier, (C) James M. Carter, (D) Joseph H. White, (E) William S. Wallace, (F) Richard M. Bonner, (G) C A. Conn, (H) William M. Davis, (I) L. J. Dupree, (K) A. W. Gibson. Going to Virginia, the Forty-fifth began its battles at Hanover Court House and served until the surrender at Appomattox, being engaged in all the great conflicts of the army of Northern Virginia, in the campaigns around Richmond, in northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, and afterward helping to baffle the desperate efforts and overwhelming resources of Grant for nearly a year. The successors to those holding office at its organization were: Col. Thomas J. Simmons; Lieut.-Cols. W. L. Grice, J. W. Carter, W. S. Wallace and C. A. Conn (killed); Majs.
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ment was assigned to the army of Tennessee; was for a time in north Mississippi; went with Bragg into Kentucky, and was especially distinguisch to attempt the relief of Vicksburg. After the campaign in north Mississippi, the battalion participated in the campaigns of Chickamauga, n served at times on distant fields of duty, in Tennessee, in north Mississippi and in Georgia. For instance, while R. Anderson's (formerly Georgia during the Atlanta campaign, Ferrell's battery was in north Mississippi under Roddey. The battalion did good and faithful service wh Light Artillery, Capt. Edward Croft, served in Tennessee and north Mississippi. It was at Jackson in the army of Gen. J. E. Johnston; serve, commanded by Capt. Robert Martin, saw service in Tennessee, north Mississippi and north Georgia. It bore itself gallantly on every field, e battle of Richmond in that State. Afterward it was sent to north Mississippi, and from that time acted as Gen. Stephen D. Lee's escort. C
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he campaign of the Carolinas, surrendering with J. E. Johnston. Its colonel, J. T. McConnell, died from wounds received in action, and was succeeded by Lieutenant-Colonel Jackson. Captain Brady was killed. Captain Osborne died at his home in Augusta, Ga., from sickness contracted during the siege of Vicksburg, being not yet twenty-one years of age. The Fortieth regiment Georgia volunteers had the following officers: Col. Abda Johnson, Lieut.-Col. Robert M. Young, Maj. Raleigh G. Camp, Adjt.rant, (F) G. W. Austin, (G) W. H. Hartnett, (H) J. H. Powell, (I) J. Whately, (K) J. D. Watson, served during the campaign of 1864, especially in the defense of Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea. The First battalion Georgia reserves, Augusta fire brigade, was commanded by Lieut.-Col. C. A. Platt, Maj. C. B. Day. The captains were: (A) C. W. Hersey, (B) J. D. Butt, (C) C. B. Day, (D) J. Henry, (E) J. C. Moore, (F) J. W. Adams. The Atlanta Fire battalion, Lieut.-Col. G. W. Lee, Ma
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