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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Salisbury, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
endrick (killed), (F) H. W. Baker, (G) R. L. Mitchell, (H) J. P. Allen, (I) D. A. Lee (died), (K) M. P. Tucker, (L) E. M. Westbrook. The Fifty-fifth was sent to east Tennessee, in the spring of 1862, and in Heth's division marched into Kentucky. Returning to east Tennessee, it served in that department until surrendered with the rest of the garrison of Cumberland Gap in the summer of 1863. After exchange it was placed on detached service, guarding prisoners at Andersonville, Ga., and Salisbury, N. C. In March, 1865, the detachments of the regiment were ordered to report to General Johnston in North Carolina, but the war ended before the order could be obeyed. The regiment had the following officers besides those already named: Cols. A. W. Persons and D. S. Printup, Lieut.-Col. D. S. Printup, Maj. M. P. Tucker, and Capt. J. J. Roberson succeeded Baker. At the organization of the Fifty-sixth regiment Georgia volunteers the field officers were: Col. E. P. Watkins, Lieut.-Col. J. T
Cherokee, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
J. R. Blount, (G) J. D: Goodwin, (H) T. J. Key, (I) R. F. Bishop. It served in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, being for a long time in middle Florida, and was one of the commands which participated in the battle of Olustee. In the spring of 1864, it was sent to Virginia, where it served with distinction to the closing scene at Appomattox. A part of this battalion was at Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea and the siege of that city in December, 1864. The Cherokee Light Artillery, Capts. M. V. D. Corput and John G. Yeiser, was one of the famous batteries of the Western army. It was sent to east Tennessee in 1861; served in that department and in Kentucky in 1862; was in Mississippi in 1863, being highly complimented for its part in the battle of Baker's Creek and the siege of Vicksburg, and participated in the battle of Missionary Ridge and the Atlanta and Tennessee campaigns. White's Artillery was commanded by Capt. B. F. White. The Terrell L
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
sboro, April 26, 1865. The First battalion Georgia infantry, sharpshooters, was made up of four Hester of Company G. The Second battalion Georgia infantry (Hardeman's) during the Appomattox c, (C) J. J. Shumate. The Seventh battalion Georgia infantry, which was consolidated with the Sixinia at Appomattox. The Eleventh battalion Georgia infantry at its organization was commanded byeventh infantry. The Eighteenth battalion Georgia infantry at its organization had the followin (formerly Thomas A. Dawson's) battery was in Georgia during the Atlanta campaign, Ferrell's batter, served in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, and formed part of the army withgiven. The officers of the Ninth battalion Georgia cavalry were: Maj. William Phillips, Capts. (as already been given. Stephens' battalion Georgia cavalry had the following officers: Lieut.-Co S. G. White, (D) J. F. Geev. A company of Georgia cavalry, commanded by Capt. T. M. Nelson (kil[64 more...]
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ry. The Ninth battalion Georgia artillery had the following officers at its organization: Maj. A. Leyden, Adjt. G. A. Lofton, Asst. Quartermaster J. W. Brown, Surg. N. A. D'Alvigny; Capts. (A) Elias Holcombe, (B) Wm. W. Sentell, (C) George W. Atkinson, (D) T. M. Peeples, (E) B. F. Wyley. This fine body of troops was at first in Georgia, and in December, 1862, was ordered to east Tennessee to report to Gen. Humphrey Marshall. It served in that department, being part of the time in southeast Kentucky and southwest Virginia. It was in the campaign around Chattanooga in September and October, 1863, and with Longstreet in the Knoxville campaign. A portion of it served in southwest Virginia in 1864, and a part of the battalion did duty in the defense of Richmond in the fall of 1864-65 and during the final campaign in the spring of 1865. Some of the successors to its first officers were: Capts. (B) H. P. Randall, (C) A. M. Wolihin, (E) B. W. York. The Eleventh battalion Georgia ar
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
bell and G. R. Niles, (B) D. A. Smith, (C) J. A. Beals and J. B. Gallie, (D) J. Manning, (E) L. J. Guilmartin, (F) A. Bonaud. The Twenty-eighth Georgia battalion of artillery, Maj. A. Bonaud, was composed of the companies of Capts. (A) J. A. Cotton, (B) L. B. Fickling, (C) C. P. Crawford, (D) G. Wilcher, (E) M. T. McGregor, (F) J. R. Blount, (G) J. D: Goodwin, (H) T. J. Key, (I) R. F. Bishop. It served in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, being for a long time in middle Florida, and was one of the commands which participated in the battle of Olustee. In the spring of 1864, it was sent to Virginia, where it served with distinction to the closing scene at Appomattox. A part of this battalion was at Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea and the siege of that city in December, 1864. The Cherokee Light Artillery, Capts. M. V. D. Corput and John G. Yeiser, was one of the famous batteries of the Western army. It was sent to east Tennessee in 1861; served in
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
. Stiles, (I) B. F. Fariss, (K) W. H. Howard. This regiment went to Virginia in the spring of 1862 in Lawton's brigade, Jackson's division. It served in the battles around Richmond, the campaign of Second Manassas and Maryland, and at Fredericksbue Confederate batteries was cut off and forced to surrender. In May, 1863, the battalion went with Gist's brigade to Jackson, Miss., to reinforce Gen. J. E. Johnston, who was gathering an army with which to attempt the relief of Vicksburg. After thril 26, 1865. The Columbus Light Artillery, Capt. Edward Croft, served in Tennessee and north Mississippi. It was at Jackson in the army of Gen. J. E. Johnston; served in the Meridian campaign in 1864, and through the summer in Forrest's commansee, north Mississippi and north Georgia. It bore itself gallantly on every field, being especially distinguished at Jackson, Miss., at Chickamauga and through the Atlanta campaign, in the last being known as Howell's battery, from its commander, Ca
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
, in the campaigns around Richmond, in northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, and afterward helping to baffle the desinsula, Seven Days before Richmond, Northern Virginia and Maryland, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and in ninsular and Richmond campaigns, in northern Virginia and Maryland, at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and tles around Richmond, the campaign of Second Manassas and Maryland, and at Fredericksburg. After Lawton's appointment as qud through the Overland campaign, the campaign of Early in Maryland and in the valley, then in the trenches at Petersburg, anRichmond, were continued through three years in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, until they closed at Appomattox in a demarched with the brigade in Early's Lynchburg, Valley and Maryland campaigns, participating gallantly in all battles. Returof Northern Virginia, around Richmond, in north Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and the campaign against Grant, closing wi
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
eorge W. Knight, (H) C. R. Russell, (I) L. L. Elkins, (K) George Eason. The regiment served for some time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, being one of the regiments engaged in the heroic defense of Battery Wagner on Morris island, near Charleston. Sent to Dalton in the spring of 1864, it participated in the Atlanta and Tennessee campaigns. In the spring of 1865, having been consolidated with the Thirty-seventh Georgia regiment and Fourth Georgia battalion of sharpshense of Savannah in December, 1864; also served for a time in the district of middle Florida. The Chestatee Artillery, under Capt. T. H. Bomar, served for some time near Charleston, taking a prominent part in the defense of Battery Bee and Morris island. In 1864 it was assigned to the army of Northern Virginia, where it did good service to the end. Martin's Light Artillery, commanded by Capt. Robert Martin, saw service in Tennessee, north Mississippi and north Georgia. It bore itself ga
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
G. Lester, (E) Ben R. Kendrick (killed), (F) H. W. Baker, (G) R. L. Mitchell, (H) J. P. Allen, (I) D. A. Lee (died), (K) M. P. Tucker, (L) E. M. Westbrook. The Fifty-fifth was sent to east Tennessee, in the spring of 1862, and in Heth's division marched into Kentucky. Returning to east Tennessee, it served in that department until surrendered with the rest of the garrison of Cumberland Gap in the summer of 1863. After exchange it was placed on detached service, guarding prisoners at Andersonville, Ga., and Salisbury, N. C. In March, 1865, the detachments of the regiment were ordered to report to General Johnston in North Carolina, but the war ended before the order could be obeyed. The regiment had the following officers besides those already named: Cols. A. W. Persons and D. S. Printup, Lieut.-Col. D. S. Printup, Maj. M. P. Tucker, and Capt. J. J. Roberson succeeded Baker. At the organization of the Fifty-sixth regiment Georgia volunteers the field officers were: Col. E. P. Wa
Dranesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ts. (B) H. P. Randall, (C) A. M. Wolihin, (E) B. W. York. The Eleventh battalion Georgia artillery had the following officers: Lieut.-Col. Allen S. Cutts, Maj. John Lane, Asst. Quartermaster Thomas H. Johnston; Capts. (A) H. M. Ross, (B) G. M. Patterson and John V. Price, (C) Charles P. Crawford, (D) James A. Blackshear, (E) John T. Wingfield and later John Lane, who subsequently became major. In 1861 Capt. Allen S. Cutts went to Virginia in command of the Sumter Flying artillery. At Dranesville Gen. J. E. B. Stuart called him the brave, true, heroic Cutts. He was promoted major and other batteries added to his command. H. M. Ross became captain of his old company and the name Sumter artillery was applied to the whole battalion. Cutts was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and John Lane, who had been captain of Company C, was made major. The battalion was distinguished in all the campaigns of the army of Northern Virginia, around Richmond, in north Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvan
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