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T. J. McQuilley (search for this): chapter 7
in, James McCown and R. S. Bevier, with Landis' battery and some other forces, constituted the Second Missouri brigade, under command of Brig.-Gen. William Y. Slack, but after the death of General Slack it was merged into the First brigade. The Second Missouri cavalry was organized with Robert McCulloch, Jr., lieutenant-colonel; Cozzens, major; Charles Quarles, adjutant; James Chandler, sergeant-major. The Third Missouri cavalry was organized with D. Todd Samuels, lieutenant-colonel; T. J. McQuilley, major; W. J. Van Kirk, quartermaster; J. Waite, surgeon. Guibor's battery was organized with Henry Guibor, captain; M. Brown, first lieutenant; W. Corkney, second lieutenant; J. McBride, third lieutenant; C. Hefferman, fourth lieutenant. Landis' battery was organized with J. C. Landis, captain; J. M. Langan, first lieutenant; W. W. Weller, second lieutenant; A. Harris, third lieutenant. Prior to the battle of Pea Ridge the staff officers of Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price were: Thomas L.
William Y. Slack (search for this): chapter 7
rate battalions under the command respectively of Colonels T. H. Rosser, John T. Hughes, Eugene Erwin, James McCown and R. S. Bevier, with Landis' battery and some other forces, constituted the Second Missouri brigade, under command of Brig.-Gen. William Y. Slack, but after the death of General Slack it was merged into the First brigade. The Second Missouri cavalry was organized with Robert McCulloch, Jr., lieutenant-colonel; Cozzens, major; Charles Quarles, adjutant; James Chandler, sergeantGeneral Slack it was merged into the First brigade. The Second Missouri cavalry was organized with Robert McCulloch, Jr., lieutenant-colonel; Cozzens, major; Charles Quarles, adjutant; James Chandler, sergeant-major. The Third Missouri cavalry was organized with D. Todd Samuels, lieutenant-colonel; T. J. McQuilley, major; W. J. Van Kirk, quartermaster; J. Waite, surgeon. Guibor's battery was organized with Henry Guibor, captain; M. Brown, first lieutenant; W. Corkney, second lieutenant; J. McBride, third lieutenant; C. Hefferman, fourth lieutenant. Landis' battery was organized with J. C. Landis, captain; J. M. Langan, first lieutenant; W. W. Weller, second lieutenant; A. Harris, third lieutenant
e way from Washington, and he surrounded himself with guards instructed to admit no one to his presence without first informing him and getting his consent. This was to prevent the order reaching him in an official form. But by stratagem a messenger finally reached him and delivered the order which terminated his military career in Missouri. It was understood at the time that he contemplated disregarding it, and was only prevented by the refusal of his subordinates, particularly Sigel and Asboth, to uphold him. It is probable, bitterly as Fremont was disappointed, Price's disappointment was more bitter. He had taken Fremont's measure, and if he could have drawn him deep enough into the mountains, would have captured or annihilated him and his army. It is certain that General Hunter, who succeeded him in the command, found the army so demoralized and so unfit for active service, that, with no force threatening him, he retreated precipitately to Rolla. As soon as Hunter left, Price
James A. Mulligan (search for this): chapter 7
ces of artillery, under the command of Col. James A. Mulligan. He reached Lexington on the morning f water. Without water it was impossible for Mulligan to hold his position. He lost a number of mered the Anderson residence, which was used by Mulligan both as a hospital and a fortification. Thisimmediately north of the Anderson house. But Mulligan watched his opportunity and by a sudden dash ed up the steep bank to the plain surrounding Mulligan's position. Men rolled them forward with hooans were 3,500 prisoners—among them were Colonels Mulligan, Marshall, Peabody, White, Grover, Major of regular cavalry were advancing to relieve Mulligan. At the same time a body of some 2,500 Missoxpecting to find boats to cross and reinforce Mulligan. But all the boats had been captured by Pricthe river and prevent reinforcements reaching Mulligan—and escaped with the loss of his tents and camp equipage. After the surrender of Mulligan, General Price found his position at Lexington unten[1 more...]<
David R. Atchison (search for this): chapter 7
e and Montgomery, and a considerable force of regular cavalry were advancing to relieve Mulligan. At the same time a body of some 2,500 Missourians, under command of Colonel Saunders, was advancing to the assistance of Price. Price sent Gen. David R. Atchison, at one time president of the United States Senate, to meet the Missourians and hurry them forward. They reached the river at Blue Mills first, and all but 500 had crossed on the ferryboat. While these 500 were waiting for an opportunit they stood. They chose to fight. The river bottom was heavily timbered, which gave them cover and a chance to use their shotguns and hunting rifles to advantage. For an hour they held the jayhawkers in check, and then, at the command of General Atchison, they charged and drove them until they broke into parties and dispersed. Before the surrender Sturgis and his cavalry appeared on the north side of the river, expecting to find boats to cross and reinforce Mulligan. But all the boats had
J. McBride (search for this): chapter 7
rson residence, which was used by Mulligan both as a hospital and a fortification. This brought them within effective rifle range of the enemy. The divisions of McBride and Harris stormed and occupied the bluffs immediately north of the Anderson house. But Mulligan watched his opportunity and by a sudden dash retook the house ane advance in entering Springfield was given to this crack company of the corps daelite. The last of the State Guard to withdraw was a small infantry battalion of McBride's division, under command of Col. T. T. Taylor, a staff officer. Taylor posted his men in a cornfield just in the edge of town, and as Zagonyi and his resplendenn Kirk, quartermaster; J. Waite, surgeon. Guibor's battery was organized with Henry Guibor, captain; M. Brown, first lieutenant; W. Corkney, second lieutenant; J. McBride, third lieutenant; C. Hefferman, fourth lieutenant. Landis' battery was organized with J. C. Landis, captain; J. M. Langan, first lieutenant; W. W. Weller, sec
Lucien McDowell (search for this): chapter 7
the Southern cause, and when General Price advised them to enlist in the Confederate army they responded favorably, but without much enthusiasm. On the 2d of December, 1861, General Price issued an order establishing a separate camp for volunteers in the Confederate service, and appointing officers to muster them in. On the 28th of December the First battery of artillery was organized, with William Wade, captain; Samuel Farrington, first lieutenant; Richard Walsh, second lieutenant; Lucien McDowell, surgeon; and John O'Bannon, chaplain. On the 30th of December the First Missouri cavalry was organized, and elected Elijah Gates, colonel; R. Chiles, lieutenant-colonel; R. W. Lawther, major; C. W. Pullins, adjutant; J. Dear, quartermaster and commissary; W. F. Stark, surgeon; D. Kavanaugh, chaplain. January 16th the First infantry was organized, with John Q. Burbridge, colonel; E. B. Hull, lieutenant-colonel; R. D. Dwyer, major; H. McCune, quartermaster; William M. Priest, commissa
F. L. Hubbell (search for this): chapter 7
; William M. Priest, commissary; J. M. Flanigan, adjutant; E. H. C. Bailey, surgeon; J. W. Vaughn, assistant surgeon; J. S. Howard, chaplain. It was afterward learned that Col. John S. Bowen had organized a regiment at Memphis, which by seniority was entitled to rank as the First Missouri infantry, and Colonel Burbridge's regiment was changed to the Second. Later, on the same day, the Third Missouri infantry was organized, with B. A. Rives, colonel; J. A. Pritchard, lieutenant-colonel; F. L. Hubbell, major; M. Ray, quartermaster and commissary. The same day the Second battery of artillery, with Churchill Clark, captain, was organized. These forces formed the First Missouri brigade, which was placed under the command of Brig.-Gen. Henry Little, up to that time General Price's assistant adjutant-general, who was appointed brigadier-general by the Richmond authorities to command the brigade. General Little's staff was: Wright Schaumborg, assistant adjutant-general; Frank Von Phul, a
J. W. Vaughn (search for this): chapter 7
of December the First Missouri cavalry was organized, and elected Elijah Gates, colonel; R. Chiles, lieutenant-colonel; R. W. Lawther, major; C. W. Pullins, adjutant; J. Dear, quartermaster and commissary; W. F. Stark, surgeon; D. Kavanaugh, chaplain. January 16th the First infantry was organized, with John Q. Burbridge, colonel; E. B. Hull, lieutenant-colonel; R. D. Dwyer, major; H. McCune, quartermaster; William M. Priest, commissary; J. M. Flanigan, adjutant; E. H. C. Bailey, surgeon; J. W. Vaughn, assistant surgeon; J. S. Howard, chaplain. It was afterward learned that Col. John S. Bowen had organized a regiment at Memphis, which by seniority was entitled to rank as the First Missouri infantry, and Colonel Burbridge's regiment was changed to the Second. Later, on the same day, the Third Missouri infantry was organized, with B. A. Rives, colonel; J. A. Pritchard, lieutenant-colonel; F. L. Hubbell, major; M. Ray, quartermaster and commissary. The same day the Second battery of ar
James S. Rains (search for this): chapter 7
s, which were arranged around the Masonic college building as a center The position was a strong one and was strongly fortified. Price's men were exhausted by five days hard marching, with only such provisions as they could pick up on the roadside as they moved along. Having driven the enemy to cover, Price took possession of the town and camped his troops at the fair grounds. After waiting several days for his ammunition train to come up, he closely invested the stronghold of the enemy. Rains' division occupied an advantageous position to the east and northeast of the works, from which an effective artillery fire was kept up by Bledsoe's and Churchill Clark's batteries. Parsons took position with his division and Guibor's battery southwest of the works. A part of General Steen's and Col. Congreve Jackson's commands was held in reserve. Skirmishers and sharpshooters from the commands first named did effective service harassing the enemy and cutting off their supply of water.
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