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he whole object and aim of war to get the enemy. In a word, it was to hazard every thing, for if failure came, it was sure to be overwhelming; only the most complete and speedy victory could insure him against absolute annihilation. These considerations were urged upon Grant by the most accomplished soldiers of his command; those who have since acquired reputations of the most brilliant character, strove to divert their chief from what they considered this fatal error. Sherman, McPherson, Logan, Wilson, all opposed—all of course within the proper limits of soldierly subordination, but all with energy. Even after the orders for the movement had been issued, Sherman rode up to Grant's headquarters, and proposed his plan. He asserted, emphatically, that the only way to take Vicksburg was from the north, selecting some high ground on the Mississippi for a base. Grant replied that such a plan would require him to go back to Memphis. Exactly so, said Sherman, that is what I mean; a
tedious, and a new route was found from Smith's plantation, where the crevasse had occurred, to Perkins's, twelve miles below. This made the march from Milliken's bend to the new point from which it horse; but, the day after receiving this request, he rode forty miles, from Milliken's bend to Perkins's landing, and there gave McClernand further instructions. The time that had been wasted, hownsports and six barges, reduced the number so that it was found necessary to march the men from Perkins's plantation to Hard Times, twenty-two miles further, and a distance of seventy miles from Millpril, the entire Thirteenth corps had arrived at Hard Times, ten thousand men having moved from Perkins's plantation on transports. Grant's headquarters, on the 24th, were with the advance. Reconre the bluff, and follow as rapidly as possible, on the heels of McPherson's corps. Move up to Perkins's plantation, with two divisions of your corps, as rapidly as possible. On the 29th, after p
unsuccessful Reenforcements ordered into the pass route found impracticable Steele's bayou expedition remarkable natural difficulties Sherman and Admiral Porteroint, and in the rear of Greenwood. The route was by way of the Yazoo river to Steele's bayou, up the latter to Black bayou, through that to Deer creek, and along De On the 16th of March, he sent Sherman with a division of troops (Stuart's) up Steele's bayou; five iron-clads and four mortar-boats accompanied, under Porter. The p the Mississippi on large transports, about thirty miles, to Eagle bend, where Steele's bayou runs within one mile of the river; they thus saved the distance from thMcPherson was brought from Lake Providence and the Yazoo pass, and Sherman from Steele's bayou; Hurlbut was stripped of every man that could be spared from the rear; my forces and turn the enemy's left. When Sherman returned, unsuccessful, from Steele's bayou, Grant consoled himself by saying that the expedition has at least push
Greenwood (search for this): chapter 7
ticated. The rebels meanwhile had made haste to avail themselves of the delay occasioned by the lack of transportation for McPherson's corps, and Grant was informed that they were hurrying troops from Vicksburg, over their shorter lines, to Greenwood. In order to relieve Ross, who was now in imminent danger of being surrounded, isolated as he was, away off in this tangled network of forest and bayou, Grant devised still another scheme. This was to hem in the enemy on the Yazoo, by sendi If we can get boats in the rear of them in time, he wrote, it will so confuse the enemy as to save Ross's force. If not, I shall feel restless for his fate until I know that Quimby has reached him. Had this plan succeeded, it would have left Greenwood between the two national forces, and made imperative the immediate abandonment of that stronghold; about thirty steamers of the enemy would thus have been destroyed, or have fallen into Grant's hands. On the 16th of March, he sent Sherman wi
W. T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 7
cable Steele's bayou expedition remarkable natural difficulties Sherman and Admiral Porter proceed to Deer creek Porter gets into danger Sherman rescues the fleet further and irremovable obstructions return of both expeditions to Milliken's bend concentration of Grant's forvernment efforts to remove Grant Grant's New plan opposition of Sherman and other of Grant's subordinates Grant inflexible movement of Tcrossing of Mississippi river by Grant's advance demonstration by Sherman against Haine's bluff Grant's confidence of success. All the wld not possibly be landed near enough for an assault, except where Sherman's bold attack, in January, had been so unsuccessful. In the reaxteenth, and Seventeenth, commanded by Major-Generals Mc-Clernand, Sherman, Hurlbut, and McPherson, respectively. The Arkansas troops had beand its communications. A direct attack had already been tried by Sherman, at the only point where a landing was practicable, and failed, be
ing, from a point two or three hundred yards further up the river, where the current impinges more strongly against the shore. It was hoped by the additional flow of water thus secured, and by the use of dredging-machines, The following correspondence contains the only suggestion made by General Halleck to Grant during this portion of the Vicksburg campaign: February 18. Cannot dredge-boats be used with advantage in the canal? There are four lying idle at Louisville, belonging to Barton, Robinson & Co., contractors. H. W. Halleck, General-in-chief. February 17. We have one dredging-machine here, and another ordered. More than two could not be advantageously used. U. S. Grant, Major-General. to widen and deepen the main canal. The design was, to allow a passage for vessels with a breadth of beam of sixty feet, and a draught of eight or nine. The troops who were engaged for two months on the canal, were encamped immediately on its west bank, and protected from po
had become very impatient. Clamors were raised everywhere against Grant's slowness; the old rumors about his personal character were revived; his soldiers were said to be dying of swamp fevers and dysenteries, in the morasses around Vicksburg; he was pronounced utterly destitute of genius or energy; his repeatedly baffled schemes declared to emanate from a brain unfitted for such trials; his' persistency was dogged obstinacy, his patience was sluggish dulness. McClernand, and Hunter, and Fremont, and McClellan were spoken of as his successors; senators and governors went to Vicksburg, and from Vicksburg to Washington, to work for his removal. McClernand's machinations at this time came very near succeeding. His advocates were never so earnest nor so hopeful, while some of Grant's best friends failed him at the critical moment. But the President said: I rather like the man; I think we'll try him a little longer. A congressman, who had been one of Grant's warmest friends, was f
Thomas Williams (search for this): chapter 7
y of the scheme. The canal, he said, is at right angles with the thread of the current at both ends, and both ends are in an eddy, the lower coming out under bluffs completely commanding it. Warrenton, a few miles below, is capable of as strong defences as Vicksburg; and the enemy, seeing us at work here, have turned their attention to that point. The peninsula is about three and a half miles long, and where the canal was located, only a mile and a fifth in width. As constructed by General Williams, the canal was ten feet wide and six deep, but his excavation did not extend through the stratum of black alluvial soil to the sandy substratum, and in 1862, when the water rose so as to run through, there was no enlargement. Grant's engineers attempted to remedy this, by cutting a wing, from a point two or three hundred yards further up the river, where the current impinges more strongly against the shore. It was hoped by the additional flow of water thus secured, and by the use of
A. Lincoln (search for this): chapter 7
l. He had himself been ordered by Halleck to direct his attention particularly to this undertaking, as the President attaches much importance to this. It was a scheme of magnificent proportions, but more likely to attract an imagination like Mr. Lincoln's than to strike favorably a purely military mind. The country, North and South, watched its progress anxiously; and, even in Europe, the plan of turning a mighty river from its course attracted attention and comment. The rebels loudly predin, who had been one of Grant's warmest friends, was found wanting at this juncture. He went to the President without being sent for, and declared that the emergencies of the country seemed to demand another commander before Vicksburg. To him Mr. Lincoln replied: I rather like the man. I think we'll try him a little longer. But for this persistency, Grant would undoubtedly have been relieved, and McClernand put in command of the expedition against Vicksburg. Grant was aware of all these effor
James B. McPherson (search for this): chapter 7
-Generals Mc-Clernand, Sherman, Hurlbut, and McPherson, respectively. The Arkansas troops had beene and circuitous in a remarkable degree. So McPherson's corps was engaged in the undertaking for mhe support of Ross; but, shortly afterwards, McPherson, with his whole corps, and an additional divoccasioned by the lack of transportation for McPherson's corps, and Grant was informed that they wet had become evident that transportation for McPherson, through the Yazoo pass, could not be procur they considered this fatal error. Sherman, McPherson, Logan, Wilson, all opposed—all of course wi to New Carthage, twenty-seven miles below. McPherson and Sherman were to follow McClernand, as raiken's bend, to hasten the transportation of McPherson's corps. In fact, during this entire campf the enemy. The Seventeenth corps, under McPherson, had followed McClernand closely, and Grant,llow as rapidly as possible, on the heels of McPherson's corps. Move up to Perkins's plantation, w[1 more...]
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