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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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e of the opportunity, and Stanley remained unmolested at Pulaski until the 14th of November, when Schofield arrived and was placed in command of all the forces in front of the rebel army. Thomas had now under Schofield's orders twenty-two thousand infantry and about five thousand two hundred horse. My effective force at this time consisted of the Fourth corps, about 12,000 men, under Major-General D. S. Stanley; the Twenty-third corps, about 10,000, under Major-General J. M. Schofield; Hatch's division of cavalry, about 4,000; Croxton's brigade, 2,500; and Capron's brigade, about 1,200. The balance of my command was distributed along the railroad, and posted at Murfreesboroa, Stevenson, Bridgeport, Huntsville, Decatur, and Chattanooga, to keep open communications and hold the posts above named, if attacked, until they could be reinforced; as up to this time it was impossible to determine which course Hood would take—advance on Nashville, or turn towards Huntsville. —Thomas's Of
J. H. Wilson (search for this): chapter 4
may do a good deal of damage, and I have sent Wilson back with all dismounted cavalry, retaining on was dispatched with the same destination, and Wilson was sent back to Nashville with all dismounted I hope you will adopt Grant's idea of turning Wilson loose, When Sherman originally proposed to rst destroyed. It was then that he said: With Wilson turned loose with all your cavalry, you will fve than hitherto. This is the only mention of Wilson's name in Grant's despatches for weeks, and it911 in the Fourth corps, and 5,328 cavalry. Wilson says, in his official report, that on the 23rdve been more than 7,000 strong. Schofield and Wilson, however, both estimated it at 10,000. The Until Smith could arrive from Missouri and Wilson remount his cavalry, Schofield's force was theNovember, his command was still at St. Louis. Wilson, too, had great difficulty in remounting his csaid: As soon as Smith's troops arrive and General Wilson has the balance of his cavalry mounted, I [1 more...]
ders for the commanders of armies. Once or twice a week he went to Meade or Butler's front, and sometimes visited the hospitals or fortificaatches were brought him instantly: to this point came messages from Meade, and Butler, and Sherman, and Sheridan, and Thomas, and Canby, and of course the highest officers of the army were constant visitors, Meade and Butler most frequent of all. Admiral Porter, who commanded the e the engineers were sent sometimes to Butler's lines, sometimes to Meade's. The other aides-de-camp were dispatched to more distant parts ofver the continent, of Canby and Foster and Rosecrans, as well as of Meade and Butler and Sheridan, so that all should contribute to the safetn carry me. If it is true that Early is going back, it behooves General Meade to be well on his guard, and Butler to reinforce him at the shobeing set to hold Hood, and Sheridan retained to watch Early, while Meade and Butler held fast to Lee, left no large force to oppose the adva
Charles Griffin (search for this): chapter 4
longing to me, but I doubt if they can reach Tennessee in less than ten days. If I were to let go Atlanta and North Georgia, and make for Hood, he would, as he did here, retreat to the south-west, leaving his militia, now assembling at Macon and Griffin, to occupy our conquests, and the work of last summer would be lost. I have retained about 50,000 good troops, and have sent back full 25,000, and have instructed General Thomas to hold defensively Nashville, Chattanooga, and Decatur, all stronint would be the terminus of his march; and in this last despatch to the general-in-chief, Sherman said: If I start before I hear further from you, or before further developments turn my course, you may take it for granted that I have moved via Griffin to Barnesville; that I break up the road between Columbus and Macon good, and then, if I feign on Columbus, will move via Macon and Millen to Savannah; or if I feign on Macon, you may take it for granted I have shot off towards Opelika, Montgome
J. M. Schofield (search for this): chapter 4
On the 30th, the Twenty-third corps, under Schofield, was added to Thomas's command. It was noo move to Johnsonville, instead of Pulaski. Schofield reached Johnsonville on the night of the 5th at Pulaski until the 14th of November, when Schofield arrived and was placed in command of all thet of the rebel army. Thomas had now under Schofield's orders twenty-two thousand infantry and aby-third corps, about 10,000, under Major-General J. M. Schofield; Hatch's division of cavalry, abourom Missouri and Wilson remount his cavalry, Schofield's force was therefore inferior to Hood's; buis consideration all others were secondary. Schofield was accordingly instructed to watch the moveritical moment, both on the right and left. Schofield had first been sent with an entire corps to not think higher of Sheridan and Thomas and Schofield than he did, nor than they deserved; that thmarvelling at what he said about Thomas, and Schofield, and Sheridan, and most of all Sherman, othe[13 more...]
W. H. Wheeler (search for this): chapter 4
nding or delaying the movement. In this despatch Sherman reported Hood's entire strength at less than forty thousand men, exclusive of Forrest's cavalry, while Thomas, he said, had at least forty-five thousand or fifty thousand soldiers, besides the force that was promised from Rosecrans. As you foresaw, and as Jeff. Davis threatened, the enemy is now in the full tide of execution of his grand plan to destroy my communications and defeat this army. His infantry, about 30,000, with Wheeler and Roddy's cavalry, from 7,000 to 10,000, are now in the neighborhood of Tuscumbia and Florence, and the water being low, are able to cross at will. Forrest seems to be scattered from Eastport to Jackson, Paris, and the lower Tennessee, and General Thomas reports the capture by him of a gunboat and five transports. General Thomas has near Athens and Pulaski, Stanley's corps, about 15,000 strong, and Schofield's corps, 10,000, en route by rail; and has at least 20,000 to 25,000 men, with
Beauregard (search for this): chapter 4
If it is found that the enemy under Hood or Beauregard have actually attempted an invasion of Tenne will be lost. By my movement I have thrown Beauregard to the west, and Thomas will have ample time stores for the invasion of Tennessee; while Beauregard, who had been placed in general command at tould be the destruction of that army, and if Beauregard moves his infantry and artillery up into ther success. . . I am more than satisfied that Beauregard has not the nerve to attack fortifications, id, on the same day: You could safely invite Beauregard across the Tennessee, and prevent his ever ras replied on the 12th: I have no fears that Beauregard can do me any harm now, and if he attempts to act against the communications of Hood and Beauregard. Two expeditions were accordingly organized an advance, as Sherman has directed, should Beauregard follow him. He was ready, not indeed to assssured, I will do all in my power to destroy Beauregard's army, but I desire to be prepared before m
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 4
ke a clear path for Sherman, to intercept reinforcements for Hood, and to concentrate whatever force it was possible to give to Thomas, on whom the brunt of the next fighting was certain to fall. The rebel government was known to be urging Kirby Smith to find some means of bringing the troops west of the Mississippi to join in the coming campaign. Despatches from Jefferson Davis had been intercepted, giving Smith positive orders; and Canby was now directed, not only to prevent the crossingSmith positive orders; and Canby was now directed, not only to prevent the crossing of the river, but to act against the communications of Hood and Beauregard. Two expeditions were accordingly organized for this purpose, one to start from Vicksburg and the other from Baton Rouge. As large a force as can be sent, said Grant, ought to go to Meridian or Selma. . . The road from Jackson should be well broken, and as much damage as possible done to the Mobile and Ohio. At the same time, Foster, in South Carolina, was directed to send a force to destroy the railroad in Sherman's
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 4
most importance. Sherman's movement may compel Lee to send troops from Richmond, and if he does, I to capture the rebel capital, and not to drive Lee out of Petersburg. On the 13th of November, heclosely watching every contingency, and holding Lee fast so that he could neither reinforce Hood noade by the army under General Sherman may cause Lee to detach largely from the force defending Richthat Early had been recalled from the Valley by Lee, and Grant sent word at once to City Point: Shoatch Early, while Meade and Butler held fast to Lee, left no large force to oppose the advance of Sn in his turn moved in such a way as to cut off Lee's supplies, the most important of which now camthe South, and proved it by the desertions from Lee's army, which, since the elections, had amounterness; they appreciated his object in detaining Lee in Richmond; and though many went away marvelliat it was quite as important to destroy them as Lee. Overpowering in will, masterful in passion,
Breckenridge (search for this): chapter 4
ate my forces, I shall assume the offensive. The rebels, however, knew the significance of this concentration quite as well as the national authorities, and Breckenridge, with about three thousand men, was dispatched from West Virginia, to distract, if possible, some of the troops in Tennessee. He succeeded only too well. On withdrew as rapidly as they had advanced. Nevertheless, Stoneman was ordered to concentrate as large a force as he could in East Tennessee, and either destroy Breckenridge, or drive him into Virginia. Thus, the enemy was able to make important diversions of national troops at this critical moment, both on the right and left. Schofield had first been sent with an entire corps to Johnsonville, and afterwards ordered to leave a portion of his command in that neighborhood; while Breckenridge attracted a large force to Knoxville, in East Tennessee, at the moment when every man, at every hazard, should have been concentrated in front of Hood. For, if the pr
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