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Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 17
ters that have accumulated in Washington. Such as are on official subjects refer to Rawlins. All others do with as your judgment dictates, only do not send any to me except such as you think absolutely require my attention and will not keep till my return. If you are not otherwise more agreeably engaged, I think you will find it pleasant here for a while and then to return with me. I have also written to Comstock to come out if he feels like it. The family are all well. Yours truly, U. S. Grant. Accordingly, I opened the hundreds of letters that had been received since his departure, answered those that required answers, and took a dozen or more with me to Galena. There I remained until the election, for Grant did not return to Washington before November. In all this period only one or two of the political people of consequence ventured to write to him, but many letters were addressed to me the contents of which were evidently intended for my chief. Of course, I laid all
ped to be the nominee of the Democrats. He was at this moment acting in unison with them; his only friends were of their party; he was their representative, and though he did many things that many Democrats disapproved, they were forced as a party to uphold him. Thus when Grant was thrust into a position of personal and prominent hostility to Johnson, the Republicans claimed him and rallied around him. He knew himself that the die was cast. He was nominated by acclamation at Cincinnati in May, 1868. Stanton carried him the news. I was with Grant at his own headquarters when the Secretary of War entered the room. I had never seen Stanton there before, but this time he did not send for Grant. He came hurriedly up the stairs panting for breath lest some one should precede him. He had obtained the first information of the vote, even in advance of Grant, and as he rushed in he exclaimed: General! I have come to tell you that you have been nominated by the Republican party for Pre
August 18th, 1868 AD (search for this): chapter 17
e heard him declare. When he went to Galena I remained in Washington writing a pamphlet history of his life, to be used in the political canvass. He knew my occupation and approved it, so that he was not after all indifferent to success nor to the means to insure it. He simply did not wish to use these means himself in this campaign. He wanted to feel that he had not striven for his own elevation. When my work was complete, he wrote me the following letter: Galena, Ill., August 18, 1868. dear Badeau,—As I have concluded to remain here till about the close of September, I think you had better open the letters that have accumulated in Washington. Such as are on official subjects refer to Rawlins. All others do with as your judgment dictates, only do not send any to me except such as you think absolutely require my attention and will not keep till my return. If you are not otherwise more agreeably engaged, I think you will find it pleasant here for a while and then
ot otherwise more agreeably engaged, I think you will find it pleasant here for a while and then to return with me. I have also written to Comstock to come out if he feels like it. The family are all well. Yours truly, U. S. Grant. Accordingly, I opened the hundreds of letters that had been received since his departure, answered those that required answers, and took a dozen or more with me to Galena. There I remained until the election, for Grant did not return to Washington before November. In all this period only one or two of the political people of consequence ventured to write to him, but many letters were addressed to me the contents of which were evidently intended for my chief. Of course, I laid all these before him, and my answers were governed by his wishes; but he still refused to advise, much more to dictate any of the strategy of the campaign. E. B. Washburne and Russell Jones were the only politicians of note who saw him often during the canvass; but they wer
t history of his life, to be used in the political canvass. He knew my occupation and approved it, so that he was not after all indifferent to success nor to the means to insure it. He simply did not wish to use these means himself in this campaign. He wanted to feel that he had not striven for his own elevation. When my work was complete, he wrote me the following letter: Galena, Ill., August 18, 1868. dear Badeau,—As I have concluded to remain here till about the close of September, I think you had better open the letters that have accumulated in Washington. Such as are on official subjects refer to Rawlins. All others do with as your judgment dictates, only do not send any to me except such as you think absolutely require my attention and will not keep till my return. If you are not otherwise more agreeably engaged, I think you will find it pleasant here for a while and then to return with me. I have also written to Comstock to come out if he feels like it. The f
be the nominee of the Democrats. He was at this moment acting in unison with them; his only friends were of their party; he was their representative, and though he did many things that many Democrats disapproved, they were forced as a party to uphold him. Thus when Grant was thrust into a position of personal and prominent hostility to Johnson, the Republicans claimed him and rallied around him. He knew himself that the die was cast. He was nominated by acclamation at Cincinnati in May, 1868. Stanton carried him the news. I was with Grant at his own headquarters when the Secretary of War entered the room. I had never seen Stanton there before, but this time he did not send for Grant. He came hurriedly up the stairs panting for breath lest some one should precede him. He had obtained the first information of the vote, even in advance of Grant, and as he rushed in he exclaimed: General! I have come to tell you that you have been nominated by the Republican party for President
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