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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir. Search the whole document.

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China (China) (search for this): chapter 50
esident Arthur appointed Mr. Young Minister to China. The joke about rough weather in the letterst interest. In the same way his letters from China and Japan and India were full of comments on tsuggest in either chapter. My visit through China was a pleasant one though the country presentsreigner no matter what his rank. The fact is Chinese like Americans better, or rather perhaps hater own internal affairs. My impression is that China is on the eve of a great revolution that will e ladies are beginning to adopt it also. From China to Japan the change is very great both in the le. The end of this century will probably see China looming up. To-morrow we go to the interiorto come. These people are becoming strong and China is sure to do so also. When they do a differeration, either for the mission to Mexico or to China or Japan. March 11th 1881. Dear Gen change there. If there should be a change in China or Japan he would have one of those places. I[1 more...]
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
or two short visits to N. J.—until Lee's surrender and my return to the National Capital. Mrs. Grant made a short visit to me—the first time after leaving Cairo—at Corinth, next at Jackson, Tenn then at Memphis where I left her when I went to Young's Point, at Young's Point one or two days before running the Vicksburg Batteries, and at Vicksburg after the surrender. She again visited me at Nashville. On leaving Ragatz we traveled to Bale, Switzerland, lay over Sunday there; thence to Strasburg where we stopped five or six hours, visiting the Cathedral, fortifications, &c.; thence to Metz for the night. The next day, until late in the afternoon, was spent in visiting points of interest in and about Metz, and in the evening we went on a few hours travel to a little town—I have forgotten the name of it—near the border of Belgium. This was to save a too early start from Metz. The following day to Antwerp where we spent two days—Thence by steamer to London. I do not now t
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
ded in the margin, also in pencil: Note. Results convinced Grant that in his selection of one of these corps commanders he contributed largely to the failure in the capture of Petersburg on arrival of the Army of the Potomac on the banks of the James. The officer referred to was W. F. Smith. Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., Oct. 23d, 1870. Dear Badeau,—I am in receipt of your letter in which you speak of the article you propose writing for the British press, and of getting sotice in the Manuscript. I did not say that about 39,000 would cover my losses in killed, wounded, & missing. What I did say was that Welles, Taylor & Co. would soon have it pass into history that we had a 100,000 men killed in getting to the James river, when we could have gone by boat, without loss, and ignoring the fact that Lee sustained any loss whatever. That 40,000, I thought about 39,000,—would cover such losses, but that the reports from time to time would show a much greater loss.
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 50
ine he wrote to me. Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., July 14th, 1869. Dear Badeau,—Your two verto was W. F. Smith. Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., Oct. 23d, 1870. Dear Badeau,—I am in receiof Ulysses S. Grant. Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., Nov. 19th, 1871. Dear Badeau,—as I have ben I have ever known. Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., Oct. 25th, 1874. My dear General,—Your letsident sent me the following telegram: Washington, D. C., April 29, 1875. General A. Badeau,—Gramercy Pletter he expected to go direct to me. Washington, D. C., Apl. 23d 1877. Dear General,—I have just rw York, March 24. General Badeau, Riggs House, Washington, D. C.: See the President at once with my letter. ork, March 25. General A. Badeau, Riggs House, Washington, D. C. I advise you to decline Copenhagen and stidignity and injustice in other affairs. Washington, D. C., Apl. 8th, 1884. Dear Badeau,—I have
Philadelphia (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
gained. Every one of these men was surpassed by Grant, to say nothing of the soldiers whom he vanquished in the field; yet Grant himself, who seemed so long the favorite of fate, was deserted at the last, and hurled into an abyss of misfortune into which every one of the others might have looked and pitied him. The canal mentioned in this letter was the Nicaragua Canal, in the construction of which Grant took the greatest interest, both while he was President and afterward. Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 27th, 1879. My dear Badeau,—I have now been in Phila nearly two weeks and have been kept so busy all the time that I have not been able to glance over the morning papers even except two or three times. The trip from Chicago here has been a very fatiguing one though very gratifying. No doubt you have seen fuller accounts of it than I would give if I was going to describe it. The reception at Louisville however astonished me. Notwithstanding a heavy rain storm when I reached t
Le Roy (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
ifications, &c.; thence to Metz for the night. The next day, until late in the afternoon, was spent in visiting points of interest in and about Metz, and in the evening we went on a few hours travel to a little town—I have forgotten the name of it—near the border of Belgium. This was to save a too early start from Metz. The following day to Antwerp where we spent two days—Thence by steamer to London. I do not now think I shall visit Portugal. I have had some correspondence with Adm.l Le Roy—who has taken Worden's place— in regard to the route. He advises against sending a vessel to Lisbon at this season of the year on account of the insufficiency of the Harbor for large vessels, making it necessary to anchor outside. My route will probably be through Madrid to Cadiz, thence up the Mediterranean. I will write a letter soon to Gen. Sherman and will take pains to say a word in the direction you mention, and will also remind him of the President's promise to me. We are all
Vienna (Wien, Austria) (search for this): chapter 50
oritative. But no man's memory is infallible, and General Grant's more than once played him false. What I wanted was for him to make no statement for print on important historical subjects till he had verified his own recollections. Vienna, Austria, Aug. 22d, 1878. My dear General,—I have your letter of the 17th with chapter enclosed, which I have read and have no comments to make upon. I agree with you in the impropriety of the publication of my table talk upon military or other metter contains his reply. He continues the references to the publications of Young already mentioned. Ischl, Austria, Aug. 29th, 1878. My dear General,—Your letter of the 22d of August—herewith returned—reached me just before leaving Vienna. The outline you propose for your history of the March to the Sea is exactly right. Follow it and give all the letters and dispatches in the body of the narrative. When you have it in type send a copy to Sherman. You have certainly divided t
Hertford (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 50
g party and a dinner; Mr. Smalley, the correspondent of the New York Tribune, invited him to breakfast, and Mr. Russell Young, of the New York Herald, to dinner; the Reform Club and the United Service Club gave him dinners, at the last of which the Duke of Cambridge, the Commander-in-Chief of the British army, presided; and there were innumerable parties, afternoon and evening, made in his honor. The Duke of Argyll, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Mrs. Hicks-Lord, of New York, the Marquis of Hertford—all entertained him; and everybody of any consequence in London called on him. The Provost of Eton invited him to lunch, the University of Oxford offered him a degree; and the City of London presented him with its freedom. Early in July he visited Belgium, and afterward passed up the Rhine to Switzerland and Northern Italy. At Brussels, Frankfort, Cologne, Geneva, and Berne he was the object of public or official courtesies. The Grand Duke of Baden invited him to his villa near Consta
Cologne (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 50
oon and evening, made in his honor. The Duke of Argyll, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Mrs. Hicks-Lord, of New York, the Marquis of Hertford—all entertained him; and everybody of any consequence in London called on him. The Provost of Eton invited him to lunch, the University of Oxford offered him a degree; and the City of London presented him with its freedom. Early in July he visited Belgium, and afterward passed up the Rhine to Switzerland and Northern Italy. At Brussels, Frankfort, Cologne, Geneva, and Berne he was the object of public or official courtesies. The Grand Duke of Baden invited him to his villa near Constance, and Garibaldi sent him a message of welcome while he was at Varese. At Ragatz I left him for a week to arrange for his tour in Scotland. The Dukes of Sutherland and Argyll had asked me to bring him to them if he went as far north as their seats of Inverary and Dunrobin, and I now wrote to them to propose his visits. In a few days he arrived in England
Burlington (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
ol, Paris, Nov. 30th 1877. Dear General,—Your letters of the 28th, with enclosures, were received this morning. I took time to read your chapter of history with which I am much pleased, and find nothing to correct. Being my last day in Paris—for the present — I had much to do, calls to return, &c., and to dine out this evening. I could not answer until now—nearly midnight. The cattle raid took place while I was away from City Point. I cannot call to memory the time of my visit to Burlington to see after the children's schooling; but Mrs. Grant never went with me there before the night of Mr. Lincoln's assassination. The present Atty. Gen. Devens was, I think, the Cavalry Gen. Gen. Torbert can answer that question, and it is too late for me to ask him. He goes with me in the morning however and I will ask him then. I believe this answers all your questions in your last letters. For the next fifteen days my address will be Nice, France. After that anything directed to
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