hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 1,800 0 Browse Search
Nellie Grant 480 0 Browse Search
Jesse Grant 391 1 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 384 0 Browse Search
Sam Grant 360 0 Browse Search
Stanton Grant 352 0 Browse Search
Andrew Johnson 330 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 302 8 Browse Search
Edwin M. Stanton 299 1 Browse Search
Johnson Grant 264 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir. Search the whole document.

Found 2,329 total hits in 458 results.

... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...
Bern (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 50
e in his honor. The Duke of Argyll, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Mrs. Hicks-Lord, of New York, the Marquis of Hertford—all entertained him; and everybody of any consequence in London called on him. The Provost of Eton invited him to lunch, the University of Oxford offered him a degree; and the City of London presented him with its freedom. Early in July he visited Belgium, and afterward passed up the Rhine to Switzerland and Northern Italy. At Brussels, Frankfort, Cologne, Geneva, and Berne he was the object of public or official courtesies. The Grand Duke of Baden invited him to his villa near Constance, and Garibaldi sent him a message of welcome while he was at Varese. At Ragatz I left him for a week to arrange for his tour in Scotland. The Dukes of Sutherland and Argyll had asked me to bring him to them if he went as far north as their seats of Inverary and Dunrobin, and I now wrote to them to propose his visits. In a few days he arrived in England and at once went to
Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): chapter 50
House, where we are now staying, and where we have received princely hospitalities. Young has described the whole thing very fully in his article for the paper. I hope you will see it. To-day we start for the interior where we expect to see more characteristic phases of Indian life & habits. Bombay has much in common with European cities. It is a manufacturing and commercial city. The old—Native—portion of the city however is different from anything I have yet seen either in Egypt or Turkey. Like in New York city we may find people from every known part of the world. The party are all well and join me in kindest regards to you. Please present my compliments to Mr. & Miss Welsh and Mr. Hoppin. Yours Truly, U. S. Grant. Letter no. Fifty. Calcutta, March 15th 1879. Dear Badeau,—We have now done India from Bombay to Delhi and back to this place. We leave here to-morrow morning for Singapore, by a regular steamer, the Richmond not having put in an appearance<
Leadville (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
about meeting in Washington to unveil the Equestrian Statue to his memory. All well. Yours Truly, U. S. Grant. Letter no. Sixty. For months after his defeat at Chicago, Grant was turning over in his mind the business he should adopt; considering many offers and examining various enterprises, as the next letter shows very fully. Manitou Springs, Col., July 28th, 1880. Dear Badeau,—Your letter of the 18th of July, with chapter enclosed, only reached me on the 26th, at Leadville. I have read the chapter over carefully and see nothing to criticise. In your letter you say that you sent me the first part of Fort Fisher some weeks ago, before the receipt of my letter. The last I have received from you, before your letter of the 18th, was the chapter which I approved in my letter from Galena. I think now, I will be in New York City soon after my return to Galena. The probabilities are that I shall make my home there. But this is not entirely certain. I am oblige
Ripon, Fond Du Lac County, Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
ceeded by Manchester to London. From this time I was constantly with him. The month of June and part of July were passed principally in London. I have already described the dinners of the Queen and the Prince of Wales, and told of the Court Ball, and the Reception at the house of the United States Minister. Besides this, dinners were offered him by the Princess Louise and the Marquis of Lorne, the Prime Minister, Lord Beaconsfield, by the Dukes of Devonshire and Wellington, the Marquis of Ripon, the Earls of Derby, Carnarvon, and Dunraven, the Master of Trinity and Lord Houghton, and many others. Mr. Pierrepont invited the Prince of Wales to meet him at dinner; I gave him an evening party and a dinner; Mr. Smalley, the correspondent of the New York Tribune, invited him to breakfast, and Mr. Russell Young, of the New York Herald, to dinner; the Reform Club and the United Service Club gave him dinners, at the last of which the Duke of Cambridge, the Commander-in-Chief of the British
Boulogne (France) (search for this): chapter 50
joke about rough weather in the letter which follows shows that General Grant had already begun to like Young, for it was only his favorites that he ever bantered or teased. 6, Eastern Terrace, Brighton, Oct. 22d 1877. Dear General,—We leave here at 11 A. M. to-morrow; will be at Victoria Stan at 12.30. It will not be necessary for you to send your carriage however unless you are recovered sufficiently to go yourself. We have a landau to meet us. I hope you will be able to go to Boulogne on the following day, I have not availed myself of Sir Edward Watkin's invitation to take other guests with me, but if you will write a note to Russell Young saying that I would be pleased with his company I will be obliged. If the weather should be rough he might stop in Folkestone until the boat returns. I wish you would write a letter for me to the Commander of the Medn Squadron saying that about the first of Decr I will go to Spain and if he can have a vessel at Lisbon I will join him
Roma (Italy) (search for this): chapter 50
eral months ago but have received no reply from him. He got my letter I know because Bucky wrote me that Porter showed it to him. Yours Truly, U. S. Grant. Letter. No. Thirty-two. This letter seems to require no explanation. Rome, Italy, March 22d, 1878. My dear General:—On arrival here I found a large mail, and in it yours enclosing a chapter of your book with letters from Sherman, Porter & Babcock. I return the whole without comment, seeing nothing absolutely to correcty Yours, U. S. Grant. Gen. A. Badeau, Consul Genl of the U. S. Letter no. Thirty-three. I paid General Grant a visit at Rome on his return to Europe, and wrote in advance asking him to allow his courier to secure rooms for me. Rome, Italy, March 30th 1878. Dear General,—I have your letter of yesterday. I will instruct Hartog to execute your commission at once. I have written to you since my arrival here and returned the last of your manuscript. We leave here two weeks f
Long Branch, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
ettled state. I leave here to-morrow for Long Branch, and the North, to be gone all summer. I wnited States has been intolerably warm. At Long Branch however we always have a breeze which makess too late to reform now. The season at Long Branch has been very pleasant so far, and the numbfriend persisted in his kindness. Long Branch, N. J., July 5th 1875. Dear General,—Your le from the effects of the climate. Long Branch, N. J., Aug. 27th, 1883. Dear Badeau,—I am jwhich he wrote to me as follows: Long Branch, N. J., July 3d 1884. Dear Badeau,—Yesterday me to render. I visited him repeatedly at Long Branch, and spent many days revising the papers heent, still engaged in his behalf. Long Branch, N. J., July 21st, 1884. Dear Badeau,—I haveerness for The Century Magazine. Long Branch, N. J., July 26th, 1884. Dear Badeau,—If youerness Campaign about a week before leaving Long Branch and have done nothing since. I propose how[6 mor
Canterbury (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 50
nce of Wales to meet him at dinner; I gave him an evening party and a dinner; Mr. Smalley, the correspondent of the New York Tribune, invited him to breakfast, and Mr. Russell Young, of the New York Herald, to dinner; the Reform Club and the United Service Club gave him dinners, at the last of which the Duke of Cambridge, the Commander-in-Chief of the British army, presided; and there were innumerable parties, afternoon and evening, made in his honor. The Duke of Argyll, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Mrs. Hicks-Lord, of New York, the Marquis of Hertford—all entertained him; and everybody of any consequence in London called on him. The Provost of Eton invited him to lunch, the University of Oxford offered him a degree; and the City of London presented him with its freedom. Early in July he visited Belgium, and afterward passed up the Rhine to Switzerland and Northern Italy. At Brussels, Frankfort, Cologne, Geneva, and Berne he was the object of public or official courtesies. The
Smyrna (Turkey) (search for this): chapter 50
appointed that he would have had if appointed when first recommended. We leave here on the 7th to take up our travels again. I have given you our proposed route in a previous letter I believe. When you write to Babcock give him and his family my kindest regards. All my family join me in desiring to be kindly remembered to you. Yours Truly, U. S. Grant. Gen. A. Badeau. Letter no. Thirty-one. This letter refers to my account of Sherman's movements around Atlanta. Smyrna, Asia Minor, Feb. 22d 1878. My dear General:—On our arrival here this A. M. I found a mail, and with it your letter and the enclosed chapter. I have read it carefully and see no word to change. I am glad you have submitted it to Sherman. He must feel pleased with the way you have treated his Atlanta Campaign, and if there is any error, in fact, he will correct it. He is at Washington where he has access to all the records and if there is any mistake in minor details he will be able to infor
Herculaneum (Italy) (search for this): chapter 50
ept when you speak about me. I am glad to see you are progressing so well. Hope Vol. 2, will soon be completed and that the book will find large sale. No doubt but Gov. Fish will take great pleasure in aiding you in your next book. He has all the data so far as his own Dept. was concerned. It was his habit to sum up the proceedings of each day before leaving his office and to keep that information for his private journal. To-day we ascend Mt. Vesuvius, to-morrow visit Pompeii and Herculaneum. About Saturday, the 22d start for Palermo, thence to Malta where we will probably spend the 25th. From there we go to Alexandria and up the Nile. That is about as far as I have definitely planned, but think on our return from the Nile, we will go to Joppa and visit Jerusalem from there, possibly Damascus and other points of interest also, and take the ship again at Beyrout. The next point will be Smyrna, then Constantinople. I am beginning to enjoy traveling and if the money holds
... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...