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Cairo (Egypt) (search for this): chapter 50
d that he would trust him with every pecuniary interest he had in the world. These letters contain constant messages to Babcock or references to him which would never have been made had Grant entertained a doubt of Babcock's innocence. Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 4th 1878. Dear General,—Your letter of the 3d of Jany., enclosing a chapter of your book, and a letter from Babcock reached me some five or six days up the Nile from here. There was no use in answering earlier because the reply could if there is any error, in fact, he will correct it. He is at Washington where he has access to all the records and if there is any mistake in minor details he will be able to inform you. You no doubt received back the former chapter sent from Cairo, Egypt. I am almost afraid to send any matter of importance, by mail, from this wretchedly governed country, and will keep this until a steamer is going to some more civilized part, or until I get to Athens. We go from here to Constantinople first.
Hong Kong (China) (search for this): chapter 50
. We are the only power that recognize their right to control their own internal affairs. My impression is that China is on the eve of a great revolution that will land her among the nations of progress. They have the elements of great wealth and great power too and not more than a generation will pass before she will make these elements felt. I received your letter suggesting that I should write to Mr. Welsh on my departure from the last British Colony, in time to have written from Hong Kong. But I did not do so, because I did not feel like making acknowledgment to the Govt. for any exhibition of respect on their part while I do gratefully acknowledge the most marked hospitality & kindness from all British officials in the east. I do not care to write the reasons for distinguishing between the people—official & unofficial of England and the Govt. But I will tell you some day. We arrived at this place yesterday & found the most extensive arrangements for our reception.
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
n the same date when appointed that he would have had if appointed when first recommended. We leave here on the 7th to take up our travels again. I have given you our proposed route in a previous letter I believe. When you write to Babcock give him and his family my kindest regards. All my family join me in desiring to be kindly remembered to you. Yours Truly, U. S. Grant. Gen. A. Badeau. Letter no. Thirty-one. This letter refers to my account of Sherman's movements around Atlanta. Smyrna, Asia Minor, Feb. 22d 1878. My dear General:—On our arrival here this A. M. I found a mail, and with it your letter and the enclosed chapter. I have read it carefully and see no word to change. I am glad you have submitted it to Sherman. He must feel pleased with the way you have treated his Atlanta Campaign, and if there is any error, in fact, he will correct it. He is at Washington where he has access to all the records and if there is any mistake in minor details he
The Hague (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 50
l it a duty to relieve all three of aspersions so unjust to their memories. We are going all the time and I am becoming very tired of it. Think we will leave several weeks earlier than we expected. Our contemplated route, as you know, is to the Hague, Copenhagen, through Sweden, Norway, then back to St. Petersburg, through Prussia & Austria to quarters for next winter. All send regards to you. I shall write to Babcock in a few days. Yours Truly, U. S. Grant. Letter no. Thirty-sehe Valley of Virginia. The letter to the Herald is the one I wrote at Grant's desire, referred to in his earlier letter of May 19, 1878. Mrs. Robeson was the wife of Grant's Secretary of the Navy. Legation of the United States, at the Hague, June 16″ 1878. Dear General,—Your letter of the 12th, with enclosure, was received before my departure from Paris. But I had not time to do more than read your letter before leaving, so brought the whole here to examine and approve or othe
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 50
route, as you know, is to the Hague, Copenhagen, through Sweden, Norway, then back to St. Petersburg, through Prussia & Austria to quarters for next winter. All send regards to you. I shall write to Babcock in a few days. Yours Truly, U. S. e future. I have no idea now of making the tour around the world, but will go back home in the spring. We will stay in Austria through September and then go to Spain and probably Portugal. I will then have seen every country in Europe and will be letter contains his reply. He continues the references to the publications of Young already mentioned. Ischl, Austria, Aug. 29th, 1878. My dear General,—Your letter of the 22d of August—herewith returned—reached me just before leaving York City, Feb'y 18th, 1882. Dear Badeau,—Yours of yesterday received. I wrote the President this morning suggesting Austria and said that your qualifications for the office were equal to those of any representative we have had at that court in
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 50
eet-car. headquarters armies of the United States, Jan'y 17th, 1866. Col.,—I am going to d Charles Francis Adams arbitrator for the United States at Geneva; and I know that he highly appreter no. Eleven. In 1875, I visited the United States to be married. President Grant had promis S. Grant. Gen. A. Badeau, Consul-Gen. of the U. S., London, Eng. Letter no. Forty-seven. m Bombay. The Mr. Welsh spoken of was the United States Minister at London, and Mr. Hoppin was theter no. Fifty-eight. I returned to the United States, on leave, in April, 1880, but Grant was imessages between the Consul-General of the United States and his own Government was thus in the hanch to defeat a Commercial Treaty with the United States. I sent your letter, with one from myselfven. This was written when I was in the United States on a leave of absence from my post in Havates Courts for the States and Territories, United States Marshals &c., which must cause great incon[13 more...]
Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
es, afternoon and evening, made in his honor. The Duke of Argyll, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Mrs. Hicks-Lord, of New York, the Marquis of Hertford—all entertained him; and everybody of any consequence in London called on him. The Provost of Eton invited him to lunch, the University of Oxford offered him a degree; and the City of London presented him with its freedom. Early in July he visited Belgium, and afterward passed up the Rhine to Switzerland and Northern Italy. At Brussels, Frankfort, Cologne, Geneva, and Berne he was the object of public or official courtesies. The Grand Duke of Baden invited him to his villa near Constance, and Garibaldi sent him a message of welcome while he was at Varese. At Ragatz I left him for a week to arrange for his tour in Scotland. The Dukes of Sutherland and Argyll had asked me to bring him to them if he went as far north as their seats of Inverary and Dunrobin, and I now wrote to them to propose his visits. In a few days he arrived
Eton (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 50
, and Mr. Russell Young, of the New York Herald, to dinner; the Reform Club and the United Service Club gave him dinners, at the last of which the Duke of Cambridge, the Commander-in-Chief of the British army, presided; and there were innumerable parties, afternoon and evening, made in his honor. The Duke of Argyll, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Mrs. Hicks-Lord, of New York, the Marquis of Hertford—all entertained him; and everybody of any consequence in London called on him. The Provost of Eton invited him to lunch, the University of Oxford offered him a degree; and the City of London presented him with its freedom. Early in July he visited Belgium, and afterward passed up the Rhine to Switzerland and Northern Italy. At Brussels, Frankfort, Cologne, Geneva, and Berne he was the object of public or official courtesies. The Grand Duke of Baden invited him to his villa near Constance, and Garibaldi sent him a message of welcome while he was at Varese. At Ragatz I left him for a
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
tz I left him for a week to arrange for his tour in Scotland. The Dukes of Sutherland and Argyll had asked me to bring him to them if he went as far north as their seats of Inverary and Dunrobin, and I now wrote to them to propose his visits. In a few days he arrived in England and at once went to Edinburgh and the Highlands, even extending his trip to John O'Groat's House, the extreme northern point of the island. By October he had returned to the south of England, stopping at Glasgow, Newcastle, Sheffield, Leeds, Sunderland, Leamington, Stratford, and Warwick, on his way, and receiving the freedom of nearly every city through which he passed. After this he paid a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Sartoris, the parents of his daughter's husband, who had a country house near Southampton. I had been absent so much from my consular post that, although this was with the sanction of the State Department, I felt that I ought now to remain for a while in London, and accordingly I was not with Ge
Yedo (Japan) (search for this): chapter 50
ave made my party their guests during our stay in the country and have a house here, at Kobi and Tokio, fitted up for our accommodation. Mrs. Grant, Fred & Young—dubbed the Commodore—join me in kig to add to this letter by way of explanation or elucidation. It tells its own story. Tokio, Japan, July 16″ 1879. My dear General:—Your letter inclosing the chapter on Hatcher's Run reache inhabitants and the marvelous advance in their civilization within so short a period. Tokio, Japan, August 1st 1879. My dear General:—Your letter enclosing the within chapter reached me in l A. Badeau. Letter no. Fifty-four. The following letter requires no comment. Tokio, Japan, August 25th 1879. My dear General,—My visit to this interesting country—and abroad—is nowndidacy for office and the opposition which was likely to come from certain quarters. Tokio, Japan, Aug. 30th 1879. My dear General,—You will see from the date above that we did
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