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A. Heiman (search for this): chapter 2
inary 32-pounders. At this juncture General Tilghman ordered Col. A. Heiman, Tenth Tennessee, the next officer in rank, to retire to Fort best defense possible. He maintained it long enough to enable Colonel Heiman to escape with the forces, and sacrificed himself and Captain T Col. Ed. C. Cook; Forty-first, Col. Robert Farquharson; Tenth, Col. A. Heiman; Forty-second, Col. W. A. Quarles; Thirtieth, Col. John W. Head Floyd in chief command. The Tennessee brigade commanders were Col. A. Heiman, Col. John C. Brown and Col. James E. Bailey, the latter comman, Col. W. A. Quarles, and Maney's battery. General Johnson and Colonel Heiman both commended in high terms the conduct of the men who met thipon the left of my line, and at the same time a cross-fire upon Colonel Heiman. Captain Graves, handling his favorite rifle piece with the samton. The artillery of Tennessee was especially conspicuous. Colonel Heiman reported that in the battle of the 13th, referring to Maney's b
E. C. Walthall (search for this): chapter 2
east Tennessee, under date of January 18, 1862, advised Gen. A. S. Johnston from his camp at Beech Grove, Ky., on the north side of the Cumberland river, that he was threatened by a superior force of the enemy in front, and finding it impossible to cross the river, I will have to make the fight on the ground I now occupy. He had under his command 4,000 effective men in two brigades: The First, commanded by Brig.-Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer, was composed of the Fifteenth Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. E. C. Walthall; Nineteenth Tennessee, Col. D. H. Cummings; Twentieth Tennessee, Col. Joel A. Battle; Twenty-fifth Tennessee, Col. S. S. Stanton; Rutledge's battery of four guns, Capt. A. M. Rutledge, and two companies of cavalry commanded by Captains Saunders and Bledsoe. The Second brigade, commanded by Brig.-Gen. William H. Carroll, was composed of the Seventeenth Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Miller; Twenty-eighth Tennessee, Col. John P. Murray; Twenty-ninth Tennessee, Col. Samuel Powell; two
James E. Bailey (search for this): chapter 2
officers and men of all arms. Gen. U. S. Grant, commanding an army of 16,000 men, had landed at Bailey's ferry, four miles below Fort Henry, on the 4th of February, 1862, and proceeded with the inves. A. Heiman; Forty-second, Col. W. A. Quarles; Thirtieth, Col. John W. Head; Forty-ninth, Col. James E. Bailey; Forty-eighth, Col. W. M. Voorhees; Tennessee battalion, Colonel Browder; Fiftieth, Colonef command. The Tennessee brigade commanders were Col. A. Heiman, Col. John C. Brown and Col. James E. Bailey, the latter commanding the garrison of the fort; Col. N. B. Forrest commanded the cavalre forehead, killing him instantly. This was the only casualty sustained by the batteries. Colonel Bailey's brigade constituted the garrison of the fort and rendered great assistance to the gunners.ird and Thirty-second Tennessee, and subsequently by the regiments of Colonels Quarles, Sugg and Bailey. General Buckner reported that the enemy made repeated attempts to storm my line on the right, b
tantly. This was the only casualty sustained by the batteries. Colonel Bailey's brigade constituted the garrison of the fort and rendered great assistance to the gunners. No battle or combat of the war was more decided than that between the heavy batteries and the Federal fleet, and there were no higher intelligence and gallantry displayed on any field of service than that exhibited by Captains Dixon, Culbertson, Ross, Beaumont, Bidwell and Graham. Lieutenants Stankiewitz, Fitzgerald, Sparkman, Bedford, George Martin and W. C. Alien were honorably mentioned. Captain Culberson reported that our success is mainly attributed to Lieut. H. S. Bedford, who directed the 10-inch gun. Captain Bidwell, referring to Private John G. Frequa (or Fuqua) in his report, stated that at the highest gun in my battery he stood perfectly upright, calm, cool and collected. I heard him say, Now, boys, see me take a chimney. The chimney [of the vessel] and the flag both fell. Very soon he sent a ball
James J. Turner (search for this): chapter 2
off further pursuit after seven hours of continuous and bloody conflict, in which our loss was severe, and leaving not less than 1,000 of the enemy dead on the field. The object of this battle seemed to be accomplished, but our council of war was divided, and the troops were ordered to their original position in the intrenchments. As Buckner returned he found the Federal forces of Gen. C. F. Smith advancing rapidly to take possession of his portion of our works, bravely opposed by Maj. James J. Turner of the Thirtieth Tennessee. He had a stubborn conflict lasting one hour and a half, resulting in the seizure of our extreme right. This position was in rear of the Confederate river batteries and field-work for their protection, and was the key to the Confederate situation. It took Buckner in reverse and necessitated the ultimate surrender of our forces. The position seized by the Federal forces had been occupied by the Second Kentucky. In the struggle to regain it, this gallant
lestation from the enemy to his original camp, and during the night fell back to the south side of the Cumberland river, abandoning from necessity his artillery, ammunition, wagons, horses and stores of every description. General Thomas had in action, or in striking distance, the Ninth, Fourteenth, Seventeenth, Thirty-first and Thirty-eighth Ohio regiments; the Second Minnesota, Tenth Indiana, Carter's Tennessee brigade, Tenth and Twelfth Kentucky regiments, Wolford's cavalry, and Kenny's, Wetmore's and Standarts' batteries. General Crittenden reported his loss at 125 killed, 309 wounded, 99 missing. Of this loss the Twentieth Tennessee had 33 killed, 59 wounded; Fifteenth Mississippi, 44 killed, 153 wounded; Nineteenth Tennessee, 10 killed, 22 wounded; Twenty-fifth Tennessee, 10 killed, 28 wounded; Seventeenth Tennessee, I killed, 25 wounded; Twenty-eighth Tennessee, 3 killed, 4 wounded; Twenty-ninth Tennessee, 5 killed, 12 wounded; Sixteenth Alabama, 9 killed, 5 wounded. General
A. S. Johnston (search for this): chapter 2
brigade, commanded by Brig.-Gen. William H. Carroll, was composed of the Seventeenth Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Miller; Twenty-eighth Tennessee, Col. John P. Murray; Twenty-ninth Tennessee, Col. Samuel Powell; two guns of McClung's battery, Captain McClung; Sixteenth Alabama, Col. W. B. Wood, and the cavalry battalions of Lieutenant-Colonel Brauner and Lieut.-Col. George Mc-Clellan. The movement to the north of the Cumberland was made by General Zollicoffer without the approval of General Johnston. In a dispatch to the latter, dated December 10, 1861, Zollicoffer said: I infer from yours that I should not have crossed the river, but it is now too late. My means of recrossing is so limited, I could hardly accomplish it in the face of the enemy. General Crittenden united his two brigades, and after consulting with their commanders, decided to attack the enemy. Soon after daylight on the 19th of January, the advance was made, and after a march of nine miles, Zollicoffer in fro
Warner P. Jones (search for this): chapter 2
in length, with about 1,000 available infantry for its defense, confronted by Pope's army and a powerful fleet of gunboats. Success, or the delay of the enemy, was impossible. Subsequently General Beauregard informed Mackall in writing, that when I sent you there, I considered matters in a desperate condition, and that you were going on a forlorn hope. Brig.-Gen. J. Trudeau was chief of artillery. The battery commanders, Capts. E. W. Rucker, Robert Sterling, Hoadley, Andrew Jackson, Jr., Jones, J. B. Caruthers, W. Y. C. Humes, Dismukes, Fisher, Johnston, were Tennesseeans. The artillerymen were in good discipline, and although the approaches to the island batteries were under water, and the batteries ultimately were submerged, the men were in good form and full of confidence. The only losses sustained by the Confederates in the attack of the 17th of March was Lieut. William M. Clark, of Rucker's battery, killed, and Sergt. I. T. Postlethwaite and six men slightly wounded. Fou
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 2
eport said that up to the time (1 o'clock p. m. of the 15th) when we were ordered back to the trenches, our success was complete and our escape secure, but our success was misleading and defeated the wishes of General Johnston. Columbus, Ky., was still held by the Confederate troops, as well as New Madrid and Island No.10. Maj. John P. McCown was detached from Columbus, on the 26th of February, 1862, and ordered to New Madrid, Mo., and placed in command. General Beauregard dispatched General Polk on the same day that the place must be watched and held at all cost. Three days earlier Major-General Pope, of the Federal army, had assumed command of the army of the Mississippi, then concentrated at Commerce, Mo. This was made Pope's base of operations against New Madrid. In a week he was in motion, and on the 3d of March he was in front of New Madrid. At once he drove in the Confederate outposts and invested the place. General Pope reported his strength at 22,808 present for dut
John Pope (search for this): chapter 2
d and held at all cost. Three days earlier Major-General Pope, of the Federal army, had assumed command of pi, then concentrated at Commerce, Mo. This was made Pope's base of operations against New Madrid. In a week he Confederate outposts and invested the place. General Pope reported his strength at 22,808 present for duty Hollins' fleet and our land batteries. On the 6th, Pope occupied Point Pleasant, twelve miles below, with in00 available infantry for its defense, confronted by Pope's army and a powerful fleet of gunboats. Success, orts would never have been reduced. It was only when Pope's army crossed to the Tennessee shore, and capture wnk in desperation in the Mississippi river. But General Pope reported to General Halleck that 273 field and cid: Soon after the surrender I was ordered by Major-General Pope to take charge of the prisoners, who were abo April, when the affair was fresh in his memory, General Pope telegraphed the department commander that 2,000
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