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Walker Anderson (search for this): chapter 30
ing them by his cool and collected orders, he was struck in the foot, near the ankle-joint, by a minnie ball, and fell. He was at once carried, with difficulty and danger, to an improvised hospital in the rear, and the wound examined and pronounced severe, but not serious. No one dreamed that one of the truest and bravest men that ever lived had the wound of death upon him. He was taken into Virginia, and when the army fell back he was brought—with his brother and aide-de-camp, Captain Walker Anderson who was also wounded at Sharpsburg, and was afterwards killed at the Wilderness—to Raleigh, arriving in the latter part of September. His wound was a most painful one, and he suffered great agony for two weeks after reaching here. Finally amputation was decided upon, but it was too late. He sunk under the operation, and on the morning of October 16th, 1862, in the thirty-second year of his age, his brave soul bade farewell to earth. His death was regarded as a public calamity, n
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 30
Ferry and come to Lee's assistance, General Anderson's command, in common with the other brigades of the divison, was subjected to one of the most trying ordeals of the war. That one division, alone and unaided (until late in the afternoon when Longstreet arrived) stood as firm as the everlasting hills which surrounded it, and resisted the assaults of the larger part of McClellan's whole army, which was hurled against it all day in successive masses. Here, as usual, Anderson distinguished himsethree days after the fight at South Mountain, and D. H. Hill's division, with Anderson's brigade on its right, wearied and worn out by continuous marching and fighting, took position in the centre of the line on the left of the Boonsboro road. Longstreet was on the right, and Jackson, who had captured Harper's Ferry with its little army and all its supplies, occupied the extreme left. McClellan and Lee at last stood face to face. General McClellan said, before the Committee of Investigation
George Burgwyn Anderson (search for this): chapter 30
General George Burgwyn Anderson—The memorial address of Hon. A. M. Waddell, May 11, 1885. Ladies and Gentlemen: Twelve centuries and a half ago, when the Kentish Queen, accompanied by Paulinus, went into Northumbria to convert King Eadwine to Christianity, and when the wise men of that kingdom were assembled to consider the nhe town of Hillsboroa, in the county of Orange, which has been the residence of as many, if not more, distinguished citizens than any county in the State, George Burgwyn Anderson was born on the 12th day of April, in the year 1831, and was the oldest son of the late William E. Anderson, Esq., and his wife, Eliza Burgwyn. In his eapainful wounds, heroic suffering and death—if all these combined constitute a theme worthy of commemoration by orator or poet, then the duty assigned me to-day might well have been entrusted to the most gifted of men, and the people of North Carolina would have a juster estimate of the life and services of George Burgwyn Anderson
John Henry King Burgwyn (search for this): chapter 30
, he immediately resigned his commission in the United States army, and, promptly returning to his native State, tendered his sword in her defence, being the first of her sons then in that army to perform that act of filial devotion. That sword was already consecrated by the blood of a brilliant young officer, who had drawn his first breath on the banks of the Cape Fear and had yielded his last in a desperate charge at Pueblo de Taos in Mexico—his brave and accomplished uncle, Captain John Henry King Burgwyn, who, on that fatal field, ended a career which, by the common consent of his superiors, would, if not untimely closed, have placed him at the head of his profession. Like his gallant and gifted nephew, that heroic son of North Carolina found his last resting place in the soil he loved so well, for although the victim of A petty fortress and a dubious hand in a foreign land, more than one thousand miles froth the western-most border of his native State, his mortal remains—
William H. Pope (search for this): chapter 30
h. Then came the Seven Days struggle around Richmond, in each of which the brigade took an active part and the young Brigadier won new laurels as a most gallant and efficient officer. In the last of these engagements, the terrible work at Malvern Hill, General Anderson, while leading a desperate charge, received a wound in the hand In August the army commenced the first invasion of the enemy's territory after having fought several battles concluding with the second battle of Manassas, where Pope was ruined and a splendid victory won; but General Anderson's brigade was not engaged in any serious fight previous to the actual invasion of Maryland. At the battle of South Mountain, however, where General D. H. Hill's division was left by General Lee to oppose the passage of General McClellan's army until Jackson could capture Harper's Ferry and come to Lee's assistance, General Anderson's command, in common with the other brigades of the divison, was subjected to one of the most trying
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 30
le of South Mountain, however, where General D. H. Hill's division was left by General Lee to oppose the passage of General McClellan's army until Jackson could capture Harper's Ferry and come to Lee's assistance, General Anderson's command, in comet arrived) stood as firm as the everlasting hills which surrounded it, and resisted the assaults of the larger part of McClellan's whole army, which was hurled against it all day in successive masses. Here, as usual, Anderson distinguished himselfht, and Jackson, who had captured Harper's Ferry with its little army and all its supplies, occupied the extreme left. McClellan and Lee at last stood face to face. General McClellan said, before the Committee of Investigation on the Conduct of General McClellan said, before the Committee of Investigation on the Conduct of the War: Our forces at the battle of Antietam were: total in action, eight seven thousand one hundred and sixty-four. General Lee, in his report, says: This great battle was fought by less than forty thousand men on our side—that is to say, that
William E. Anderson (search for this): chapter 30
he county of Orange, which has been the residence of as many, if not more, distinguished citizens than any county in the State, George Burgwyn Anderson was born on the 12th day of April, in the year 1831, and was the oldest son of the late William E. Anderson, Esq., and his wife, Eliza Burgwyn. In his early years he exhibited the intellectual and moral traits which, in their full development, adorned his manhood, and attracted the admiration, and commanded the respect of all who knew him. A beer the command of Albert Sidney Johnston was sent to that Territory to vindicate the supremacy of the Federal authority and the rights of civilization and decency. The Second Dragoons was a part of the force detailed for this service, and Lieutenant Anderson served on the expedition as adjutant of the regiment. Remaining there until the fall of 1859, he was detached and sent to Kentucky, where, on the 8th of November of that year, he was united in marriage to Miss Mildred Ewing, of Louisville
E. B. Gray (search for this): chapter 30
ends here we emerge into the effulgence of an eternal day. That term, as said the aged Ealdorman, is but a sparrow's flight through a banquet hall, but beyond the portal, instead of wintry darkness, dwells the light. As the first of American poets has beautifully said: There is no death; what seems so is transition: This life of mortal breath Is but a suburb of the life elysian Whose portal we call Death. Still many of us draw near the portal with fear and trembling, as if the words of Gray's elegy were to be literally fulfilled and we were to be— Each in his narrow cell forever laid. Base thought! degrading superstition! which dishonors the mind and heart that harbor it, and which is equally at war with every analogy that can be drawn from nature and every precept of the Divine Law. So far from being true, the doctrine that death is only another name for annihilation is but a dreadful nightmare, a torturing dream of the impossible, the very capacity to conceive which
Mildred Ewing (search for this): chapter 30
e), and an expedition under the command of Albert Sidney Johnston was sent to that Territory to vindicate the supremacy of the Federal authority and the rights of civilization and decency. The Second Dragoons was a part of the force detailed for this service, and Lieutenant Anderson served on the expedition as adjutant of the regiment. Remaining there until the fall of 1859, he was detached and sent to Kentucky, where, on the 8th of November of that year, he was united in marriage to Miss Mildred Ewing, of Louisville, and was soon thereafter stationed in that city as a recruiting officer. There he remained—in the enjoyment of what were, doubtless, the happiest days of his life—until the demon of civil war stamped his foot for the first time in our land in April, 1861, when, knowing full well what that meant and how dire would be the need of North Carolina for all her true sons, and especially those with military knowledge and experience, he immediately resigned his commission in th
Pueblo Taos (search for this): chapter 30
ue sons, and especially those with military knowledge and experience, he immediately resigned his commission in the United States army, and, promptly returning to his native State, tendered his sword in her defence, being the first of her sons then in that army to perform that act of filial devotion. That sword was already consecrated by the blood of a brilliant young officer, who had drawn his first breath on the banks of the Cape Fear and had yielded his last in a desperate charge at Pueblo de Taos in Mexico—his brave and accomplished uncle, Captain John Henry King Burgwyn, who, on that fatal field, ended a career which, by the common consent of his superiors, would, if not untimely closed, have placed him at the head of his profession. Like his gallant and gifted nephew, that heroic son of North Carolina found his last resting place in the soil he loved so well, for although the victim of A petty fortress and a dubious hand in a foreign land, more than one thousand miles fro
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