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Dixon Barnes (search for this): chapter 1.1
n Hayne McMeekin. The regiment was organized by the election of Colonel R. G. M. Dunnovant, of Chester, as Colonel; Dixon Barnes, of Lancaster, as Lieutenant-Colonel; and Cadwalader Jones, of York, as Major. Colonel Dunnovant had been Lieutenantldiers had on this day achieved were to mark it as the bloody and glorious day of the 29th August. In this battle Colonel Dixon Barnes greatly distinguished himself. It was the Twelfth which drove out the New England brigade, which, under Grover, h the brigade had nine out of eleven field-officers killed and wounded, and 619 out of 1,500 men carried into action. Colonel Barnes and Major McCorkle were among the wounded. The Twelfth regiment lost 145—killed, 24, and wounded, 121. A few evenined the capture of Harper's Ferry and the battle of Sharpsburg, in which the Twelfth sustained the irreparable loss of Colonel Barnes, and in which Captains J. L. Miller and H. C. Davis and Lieutenant R. M. Kerr were wounded. The Twelfth lost 102 of
John L. Miller (search for this): chapter 1.1
and the battle of Sharpsburg, in which the Twelfth sustained the irreparable loss of Colonel Barnes, and in which Captains J. L. Miller and H. C. Davis and Lieutenant R. M. Kerr were wounded. The Twelfth lost 102 of the 163 killed and wounded in then commanded by Colonel Cadwalader Jones in these battles. He resigned after Fredericksburg and was succeeded by Colonel John L. Miller. Colonel Miller's first battle was Chancellorsville, which was followed by an incident worthy of note. The TwelfColonel Miller's first battle was Chancellorsville, which was followed by an incident worthy of note. The Twelfth, with but 340 guns, was put in charge of over 2,000 Federal prisoners and marched them safely through to Richmond without the loss of one of them. Then followed Gettysburg, in which the Twelfth lost 20 killed, 105 wounded, and 5 missing—among the great campaign of 1864, and in its first battle, the Wilderness, the Twelfth had another gallant colonel killed, Colonel John L. Miller, and with him fell Lieutenants J. L. McKnight and J. A. Gavin. Lieutenant-Colonel E. F. Bookter and Lieutenants J
August 9th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
Captain J. R. Harrison. The companies from Chester were: Chester Blues, Captain E. C. McLure; Captain G. L. Strait's company, Captain J. A. Walker's company, Captain O. Harden's company, and Captain J. Mike Brown's company. Colonel Rion resigned in June, 1861, and the regiment went to Virginia under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Secrest. Upon the application of the regiment, Colonel Charles S. Winder (who afterwards became brigadier-general and was killed at Cedar Run on the 9th August, 1862, while commanding the Stonewall Brigade under Jackson,) was assigned to the command and did much to perfect its organization. But it was under Lieutenant-Colonel Secrest, who had been a distinguished officer of the Palmetto regiment in Mexico, that the regiment was to make its first fight and win its first laurels. Though the Sixth was not in time to take part in the First Manassas, it was to be the next regiment from this State to be able to style itself veteran. It was engaged in
off, consisting of sixty horses and one hundred muskets and rifles. Sumter attacked Rocky Mount with his characteristic impetuosity, but the British officer was found on his guard, and his position was one of great strength. Three times did Sumter attempt to carry this stronghold, but without success. He drew off, however, undisturbed, having lost few of his followers. Undaunted, Sumter was soon again in the saddle. Quitting his retreat on the Catawba, with Davie, J. Erwin Hill, and Lacy he darted on the British line of communication, and on the 6th of August fell on the post at Hanging Rock. Then ensued a bloody battle—the contest grew fierce and the issue doubtful. The infantry of Tarleton's Legion and Bryan's North Carolina Loyalists were forced back, but Brown's regiment held their ground until nearly all the officers and a great proportion of its soldiers had fallen. The British, then falling back, formed a hollow square in the centre of their position. Sumter advanc
pper and lower country—Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, Huguenots, and Churchmen combining in the midst of war in the cause of education. Its first president was Colonel John Winn, and its directors were General William Strother and Captain Robert Ellison. Colonel Thomas Taylor and Captain Thomas Woodward were among the first signers of the Constitution. Among the names of its members were Andrew Pickens, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, and four sons of Anthony Hampton—Henry, Edward, Richard, and Wade—and the brother of Anthony, John Hampton. The teacher at this time was, it is believed, Mr. William Humphreys. Dr. Howe, in his History of the Presbyterian Church, says: At what time this school was discontinued is not known, but it was probably about the time when Lord Cornwallis moved his headquarters to Winnsboro, in 1780. Two years after the end of the war, i. e., in 1783, a committee of the Society reported that the temporary school had been broken up by the enemy, but the buildings we<
Baldy Smith (search for this): chapter 1.1
egard for leading successfully an attack on Morris Island in which he was wounded by a bayonet. Going to Virginia with Hagood's brigade in the spring of 1864, on the 14th May, preceding the battle at Drury's Bluff, he drove back a line of battle with his skirmishers. He was wounded in the battle on the 16th May, but continued on the field during the whole day. At Petersburg, on 14th June, he again led, at night, a line of skirmishers of Hagood's brigade and drove back the advance of General Baldy Smith; again, on the 18th June, he led another attack. He was twice offered and refused the command of the Twenty-second regiment, and after the battle of Bentonville was offered by General Johnston a commission as temporary brigadier-general. Colonel Rion and his battalion served on the coast of South Carolina in Fort Sumter and battery Wagner, and in Virginia and North Carolina, and were engaged in twenty-two battles. There were, besides these, two troops of cavalry from Fairfiel
Robert Wilson (search for this): chapter 1.1
makes 644 deaths in the regiment. So that probably more than half of all who entered the regiment died during the war. For these statistics see Caldwell's History of Gregg's and McGowan's Brigades. The Seventeenth regiment. The Seventeenth regiment, which was organized in the early part of 1862 (with the exception of but two companies from Barnwell), was composed entirely of men from York, Chester, Lancaster and Fairfield. These were: Three companies from York, Captains Meacham, Wilson and Whitingan; two companies from Chester, Captains Culp and Caskey, and two companies from Fairfield, Co. B, Captain W. P. Coleman and Co.—, Captain James Beatty. It was organized by the election of Governor John H. Means as Colonel, F. W. McMaster as Lieutenant-Colonel, and Julius Mills as Major, with Robert Stark Means as Adjutant. This regiment's first service was on the coast of South Carolina, but it was to be its fortune, with the rest of its brigade, first under Evans, then under
uk and Ferguson, who was with him, succeeded in mounting their horses, but they were shot and fell in sight of both parties, whereupon the British dropped their arms and fled. The battle continued about an hour and many of the British were killed and wounded, with but little damage to the Whigs, only one of whom was killed—his name was Campbell. Houk was shot by John Carrol, who, with his brother Thomas, was among the foremost in action. There were also two brothers named Ross, two named Hanna, and two named Adair—one of these subsequently was greatly distinguished and became General Adair. There were also four sons of John Moore and five sons of James Williamson, at whose residence the battle was fought. There were three brothers Bratton present. This little victory was the first check given to the British after the fall of Charleston—the first time that regulars had been opposed in an engagement by undisciplined militia. It had a most salutary effect on the destinies of the <
Johnson Hagood (search for this): chapter 1.1
battalion he served during the rest of the war. On the 14th July, 1863, he was complimented in general orders by General Beauregard for leading successfully an attack on Morris Island in which he was wounded by a bayonet. Going to Virginia with Hagood's brigade in the spring of 1864, on the 14th May, preceding the battle at Drury's Bluff, he drove back a line of battle with his skirmishers. He was wounded in the battle on the 16th May, but continued on the field during the whole day. At Petersburg, on 14th June, he again led, at night, a line of skirmishers of Hagood's brigade and drove back the advance of General Baldy Smith; again, on the 18th June, he led another attack. He was twice offered and refused the command of the Twenty-second regiment, and after the battle of Bentonville was offered by General Johnston a commission as temporary brigadier-general. Colonel Rion and his battalion served on the coast of South Carolina in Fort Sumter and battery Wagner, and in Virginia
sh influence predominated, the sentiments of these people favored the cause of the Loyalists. Parton's Life of Jackson p. 76. But, as Judge Johnson, in his Life of Greene, says, fortunately tties, and there for many days Andrew Jackson and his brother, Robert, first saw what war was. Parton's Life of Jackson, p. 70. Then came Lord Rawdon from Camden and encamped with a large body onn, and Lieutenant Crawford, and young Joseph Gaston, but sixteen years of age, were wounded. Parton, in his Life of Jackson, tells us that the Jackson boys— Andrew, then thirteen years of age, ande led by Sumter, and the Brattons and the McLures fail to answer the call of their country? Mr. Parton, in his Life of Jackson—describing that strange and lonely place, the old graveyard at Waxhawsfeeling of one who comes upon the ancient burial place of a race extinct. This was written by Mr. Parton in 1860. Would he go to that burial-place to-day he would see that the race of heroes was not
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