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Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
us in place of Dr. Warren. Dr. Beale was a Kentuckian, and had been a lieutenant in Company D, Ninth Kentucky infantry. He was engaged with his regiment in the battles of Shiloh and Murfreesboro. At the latter place he was severely wounded. He took up a gun which had fallen from the hands of a disabled soldier, and dropping upon one knee to fire, was hit by a ball which made six holes in his body, passing through both thighs and calf of one leg. He was taken prisoner, and confined in Fort Delaware. While there he was promoted to be captain, but when he was exchanged, finding his health much broken, he returned to his profession, was made assistant surgeon, and assigned to the Twenty-fifth South Carolina volunteers. The place made vacant by the death of Lieutenant Blum, of Company A, was filled by the promotion of the next lieutenant in rank of his company, and Lieutenant Callahan was elected Junior Second Lieutenant. In Company K, after the death of Lieutenant McDonald, the org
Folly Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
n a good account of themselves. The military authorities in Charleston thought that there were some of the enemy on Folly Island. Colonel Hagood was directed to sweep that island with a line of skirmishers, commencing at the southern end and goingnt. We went down the creek and landed near the mouth of the Stono. The line was formed extending across the island. Folly Island was covered with an almost impenetrable thicket of scrub live-oaks, palmettos, pines, briers, etc. A heavy rain, whichame grouped, but the reconnoisance was made sufficiently well to enable me to report that the enemy were not occupying Folly Island. Nothing was seen of the force that was to cooperate with us. We returned to camp after performing a very arduous dayquiet of the post was disturbed this evening. A steamer of the enemy's, going from the creek or river which separates Folly Island from Taylor's and James Island towards Folly Inlet, passed between this post and Long Island, opposite this place. I
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
ay's service. About the last of December the troops that were garrisoning Fort Pickens, on Battery Island, were relieved by a detachment made up of details from evre not South Carolinians. We had preaching several times while we were at Fort Pickens Once, Rev. James McDowell visited James Island to see some of his acquaintanve first on Charleston or Savannah. About the 3d of March the garrison at Fort Pickens was reinforced by the addition of two companies, Washington Light Infantry, to be relieved from further service on the court, so that I might return to Fort Pickens and re-enlist my company. This request could have been granted by the generCompany B, Washington Light Infantry, receipted to me for ordnance stores at Fort Pickens and Green Creek Bridge, and early in the morning of the 14th day of April, 1. It will be remembered that they succeeded the Wee Nees as the garrison of Fort Pickens on Battery Island. I went at once to Charleston, and, with the assistance o
Savannah River (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
r negroes with them, but the most of them failed to get anything away from their plantations. All of their household goods and tens of thousands of negroes were left to fall into the hands of the invaders. A perfect panic, in fact, seized the planters when they ascertained that the Confederates had fallen back. There was No stop, no stay, no thought to ask or tell Who escaped by flight, or who by battle fell; Twas tumult all and violence of flight. The coast from the mouth of the Savannah to the mouth of the Stono, and all of the intermediate islands, were now exposed to the ravages of the Federal forces. It was expected that the enemy would follow up their success by an immediate attack on Charleston. The excitement in that city was intense. The militia was ordered out to reinforce the troops, and everything done to put the city in a thorough state of defence. We were in daily expectation of a fleet in the Stono, co-operating with an army moving on Charleston. Noncomba
Mount Pleasant (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
ent left it till that place was abandoned. The defences below Georgetown were abandoned earlier, and on the 3d of April the Tenth South Carolina volunteers, which had been in charge of these defences, reached Charleston and went into camp at Mount Pleasant, where they remained till they went West. General W. J. Hardee was sent to expostulate with General Pemberton, but it was of no use. That general could not be induced to rescind the orders which were working such dissatisfaction among the peht before, the steamer engaged in transferring troops had been mistaken by our batteries for a vessel of the enemy's and sunk with all on board. Fortunately, it was not in very deep water, and there were very few casualties. One man swam to Mount Pleasant, almost entirely across the harbor, another to Fort Sumter, and the rest were taken off by another boat. September 1st, 1863.—Orders received this morning directing me to conduct the Twenty-fifth to Johnson, there to take steamer tonight f
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
t was not long till it was ascertained that Beaufort and Port Royal were their objective points. Heavy firing was heard in l. This was before the days of monitors and ironclads. Port Royal was of so much value to us, and its acquisition would gi been disembarked and were in possession of our works at Port Royal. The reason given for the disaster was, that the supply out to him. Many of the planters in the neighborhood of Port Royal left as soon as the landing of the enemy was known. Somwould not materially affect. If the advantage gained at Port Royal had been followed by an immediate advance and vigorous at us on Battery Island. Not long after the capture of Port Royal and Beaufort, General Sherman advanced his forces, and aeard that a fleet of the enemy's vessels had sailed from Port Royal. It was supposed that it went to co-operate with the Bufell about as easy a prey into the hands of the enemy as Port Royal had done. About the middle of February we heard the n
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
hout greater effort to hold it. On the 18th of January we heard that a fleet of the enemy's vessels had sailed from Port Royal. It was supposed that it went to co-operate with the Burnside expedition, the destination of which we did not know at this date, but heard afterwards that Roanoke Island was the objective point. Our works on that island fell about as easy a prey into the hands of the enemy as Port Royal had done. About the middle of February we heard the news of the fall of Nashville and the capture of thirteen thousand of our troops. This news had a very disheartening and depressing effect on us. It made us contemplate the possibility of the failure of our cause. Until about this time, failure was not regarded by the army as among the possibilities. It seemed to us that thirteen thousand men ought not to surrender to any force. We hoped the affair was exaggerated, and that when full particulars were received there would not be so much cause for discouragement.
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
e regiment and sent to another command in Virginia. Dr. Warren was a kind-hearted gentleman, able and intelligent, and thoroughly familiar with the mysteries of his profession. Our loss seemed irreparable, but we were exceedingly fortunate in having a gentleman, Dr. A. J. Beale, of equal ability assigned to us in place of Dr. Warren. Dr. Beale was a Kentuckian, and had been a lieutenant in Company D, Ninth Kentucky infantry. He was engaged with his regiment in the battles of Shiloh and Murfreesboro. At the latter place he was severely wounded. He took up a gun which had fallen from the hands of a disabled soldier, and dropping upon one knee to fire, was hit by a ball which made six holes in his body, passing through both thighs and calf of one leg. He was taken prisoner, and confined in Fort Delaware. While there he was promoted to be captain, but when he was exchanged, finding his health much broken, he returned to his profession, was made assistant surgeon, and assigned to the
Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
and some of the officers of the regiment. Our camp began to present quite the appearance of a village. We used the Presbyterian church as our chapel, and had some excellent discourses from Rev. A. F. Dickson, and occasionally from other ministers of the Gospel, who were either visiting the troops or connected with the regiments on the island. Captain Thomas, of the Twenty-first South Carolina volunteers, should not be forgotten. He was the pastor of the Baptist church in Bennettsville, Marlboro district, and went into service in command of a company composed largely of the young men of his congregation. His influence was highly beneficial to his regiment. His bravery as a soldier was equal to his eloquence and fervor as a preacher. Musician Mueller, chief of the regimental band, added much to the interest of the religious services. The performers on the brass horns, belonging to the band under his direction, made music surpassing the finest organ. The sound was much more like
Orangeburg, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.15
Wappoo Cut and into Stono, down that river to a point near its mouth, and up a creek which separates Folly from Cole's Island. After landing, we were assigned our position in the regimental camp next to the St. Matthews Rifles, a company from Orangeburg district and one of the best in the regiment. My friend, Olin M. Dantzler, was then First Lieutenant of that company. His agreeable companionship and that of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas J. Glover, are among my most pleasant recollections of Colntry represented Charleston; the Edisto Rifles and St. Matthew's Rifles were from Orangeburg District, and the Wee Nee Volunteers and Ripley Guards from Williamsburg. On the 1st of May I reached Secessionville, on James Island, where the two Orangeburg companies and Wee Nees were encamped. These were soon joined by the three Charleston companies, and before the end of the month by the Ripley Guards and the Marion Rifles, Captain W. J. McKerral, and Yeaden Light Infantry, Captain Samuel L. Ha
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