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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
her position and the reversal of an unconstitutional act. The Louisiana purchase. From this time onward came thick and fast, occasionsrights and their construction of the Constitution. When the Louisiana territory was acquired from France in 1803, not only was the purchase trance to the fairest portion of our present national domain—Louisiana territory, the gateway of the Mississippi; Texas, an empire in itself, views of selfish interest. The opposition to the acquisition of Louisiana was solely a matter of interest—a question of political preponderlcomed in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, and could we doubt of Louisiana and Texas? But Virginia must be associated. * * * Arkansas, Tennllow of course, and Florida of necessity. Again, in 1811, when Louisiana knocked at the door of the Union for admission as a State, Josiahhe is closely followed by Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, and ere the recently elected sectional President of the U
J. W. Mallett (search for this): chapter 1.9
1890. A large audience filled the hall and galleries. Among those present were: Ex-Senator Robert E. Withers, Colonel R. T. W. Duke, Colonel Robert Stribling, General Eppa Hunton, Rev. Frank String fellow (Lee's scout), Generals A. R. Lawton and P. B. M. Young, of Georgia; General C. W. Field, Colonel L. Q. Washington, Colonel William H. Palmer, Colonel David Zable, of the old Fourteenth Louisiana regiment and president of the Louisiana division of the Army of Northern Virginia; Professor J. W. Mallett, of the University, and General William B. Taliaferro. General Fitz. Lee came in during the delivery of the address and was received with applause. At 8:25 o'clock General William H. Payne, president of the Association, called it to order and asked Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., chaplain of the Association, to lead in prayer. General Payne now arose and said: Comrades of the Army of Northern Virginia, we welcome you on this most interesting occasion which has brought so many
Eppa Hunton (search for this): chapter 1.9
Annual Reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia. With address of General E. M. Law on the Confederate Revolution. The annual reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia was held in the hall of the House of Delegates on the night of May 28th, 1890. A large audience filled the hall and galleries. Among those present were: Ex-Senator Robert E. Withers, Colonel R. T. W. Duke, Colonel Robert Stribling, General Eppa Hunton, Rev. Frank String fellow (Lee's scout), Generals A. R. Lawton and P. B. M. Young, of Georgia; General C. W. Field, Colonel L. Q. Washington, Colonel William H. Palmer, Colonel David Zable, of the old Fourteenth Louisiana regiment and president of the Louisiana division of the Army of Northern Virginia; Professor J. W. Mallett, of the University, and General William B. Taliaferro. General Fitz. Lee came in during the delivery of the address and was received with applause. At 8:25 o'clock General William H. Payne, pres
R. T. W. Duke (search for this): chapter 1.9
Annual Reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia. With address of General E. M. Law on the Confederate Revolution. The annual reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia was held in the hall of the House of Delegates on the night of May 28th, 1890. A large audience filled the hall and galleries. Among those present were: Ex-Senator Robert E. Withers, Colonel R. T. W. Duke, Colonel Robert Stribling, General Eppa Hunton, Rev. Frank String fellow (Lee's scout), Generals A. R. Lawton and P. B. M. Young, of Georgia; General C. W. Field, Colonel L. Q. Washington, Colonel William H. Palmer, Colonel David Zable, of the old Fourteenth Louisiana regiment and president of the Louisiana division of the Army of Northern Virginia; Professor J. W. Mallett, of the University, and General William B. Taliaferro. General Fitz. Lee came in during the delivery of the address and was received with applause. At 8:25 o'clock General William H. Payne, pres
Josiah Quincy (search for this): chapter 1.9
rights of the slave-holding States were invaded? The principles of our Revolution point to the remedy—a separation. * * * It must begin in South Carolina. The proposition would be welcomed in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, and could we doubt of Louisiana and Texas? But Virginia must be associated. * * * Arkansas, Tennessee and North Carolina would follow of course, and Florida of necessity. Again, in 1811, when Louisiana knocked at the door of the Union for admission as a State, Josiah Quincy, of Massachusetts, said upon the floor of Congress, If this bill passes, it is my deliberate opinion that it is a virtual dissolution of the Union; that it will free the States from their moral obligation, and as it is the right of all, so it will be the duty of some definitely to prepare for a separation, amicably if they can, violently if they must. Trace our late civil war to its source and you will find it here. From this time forth the conflict was fiercely waged on the hustings a
enes of the Confederate revolutionary drama. A drama which had a continent for its stage, armed millions for its actors and the world for spectators. The Anglo-Saxon spirit. In the light of subsequent events, it seems passing strange that so few of our political prophets, either North or South, foresaw the vast proportions tlly realized that both had inherited from the sturdiest race on earth, that dogged, tenacious, never say die, fight to the death spirit that has stamped the Anglo- Saxon as a conqueror wherever he has come. A race before whose achievements the deeds of the Macedonian and the Roman pale. A race that has fought more battles, stood ll never realize it. No other people could have stood the test and passed the ordeal successfully. But the law-abiding, courageous, determined spirit of the Anglo-Saxon triumphed at last. The people of the South, trained as men were never trained before, to lessons of danger, self-sacrifice, self-reliance, and patience, have met
J. William Jones (search for this): chapter 1.9
and General William B. Taliaferro. General Fitz. Lee came in during the delivery of the address and was received with applause. At 8:25 o'clock General William H. Payne, president of the Association, called it to order and asked Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., chaplain of the Association, to lead in prayer. General Payne now arose and said: Comrades of the Army of Northern Virginia, we welcome you on this most interesting occasion which has brought so many of us here. The people of the e he was warmly congratulated by many of those who heard him. General Jubal A. Early entered the hall during the delivery of the address, and his appearance was the signal for an outburst of applause. At the close of the address, Rev. Dr. J. William Jones moved that the thanks of the Association be returned to General Law, and that a copy be requested for publication. Adopted unanimously. Major J. Booton Hill moved that a committee of five be appointed to propose the names of the o
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.9
her sorest need, true to every pledge they have given, so they are true to-day, to themselves and to the future in perpetuating the memory of their heroes and in vindicating the principles for which they fought and their comrades fell. Lee and Davis. The great pageant of the morrow, which shall thrill the heart of this historic city with the grandest pulsations that honor, love and reverence can ever inspire, will fitly illustrate the character and principles of the Confederate revolutionalso the first rays of that sun of righteousness and justice, in whose light future generations will read his among the immortal names that were not born to die. After a great and noble life, with the honors of two countries thick upon him, Jefferson Davis died more a hero than if he had fallen upon the glorious field of Buena Vista, in the service of the Union, or upon some equally glorious battle-field of the Confederacy. The Private soldier. Nor even here is our duty ended. Let sti
hs her jewels to history. Let the song and the stately rhyme With softly sounding tread Go forth to voice their praise and honor their memories until the South's last poet is dead and his harp hangs tuneless on the willows of time. Aye, of their devotion, their heroism, their Christ-like ministrations and sufferings, let the recording angel, dipping his glowing pen in the golden chalice of the sun, write upon the great scroll of heaven immortal. The death of the Confederacy. When Aeneas, the Trojan hero, was commanded by the Queen of Carthage to relate the tragic story of the fall of Troy, he gave expression to his unutterable grief in the question, who of the myrmidons, or what soldier even of the stern Ulysses, can refrain from tears at such a recital? The fall of the Confederacy and the death struggle of the Army of Northern Virginia are rife with scenes as harrowing and heroic as any enacted beneath the walls of Troy, and equally worthy of the sympathy even of their fo
owing were the regular toasts and respondents: The Infantry: If ever a band of warriors won A paen for deeds of valor done, They deserve, indeed, the glorious meed And the proud triumphal hymn. General John B. Gordon. The Artillery: The splendid service of the artillery nerved the arm and inspired the heart of the other branches of the army, and frequently turned the tide of battle to victory. Colonel Thomas H. Carter. The Cavalry: As the Immortals rode to war, when Hector fought for Troy, These rode as if immortals, too, inspired with awful joy. General W. H. Payne. The Women of the South: History shall tell how you Have nobly borne your part, And won the proudest triumph yet, The triumph of the heart. Judge F. R. Farrar. The Confederate Dead: It seeks not where their bodies lie, By bloody hillside, plain, or river, Their names are bright on Fame's proud sky; Their deeds of valor live forever. Senator John W. Daniel. General Gordon was received
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