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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Louis F. Emilio (search for this): chapter 1.13
war; did tours of duty at Fort Sumter and at Battery Wagner, and was with the army when it surrendered at Goldsboro, N. C. In conclusion, I remark that Captain Stuart was fortunate in his command, having the entire confidence of the well-drilled veteran artillerists guarding the key of the battle line at Honey Hill. I doubt if any better light artillery battle service was ever directed or performed in any war! The best evidence of this may be to take the enemy's account of it. In Captain Emilio's (U. S. A.) book we get an idea of the confusion and demoralization caused by Captain Stuart and his artillerists at the head of the road after three hours service of his guns. I quote: The 35th United States colored troops, Colonel Barber, charged up the road; it went forward with a cheer, but receiving a terrible fire, after some loss, was forced to retire. * * * Colonel Hartwell, with eight companies 55th Massachusetts, ordered a charge in double column. Twice forced to fall
y uniformed in blue dress coats, with buff breasts, such as are shown in pictures of Napoleon as consul. As a boy, I have often seen the company parading as infantry in that beautiful uniform; a prominent corps, and was part of the escort to Lafayette in 1824. About the year 1840 it changed its service to light artillery, and was the first light battery seen on the streets of Charleston with guns and horses; followed soon after by the Washington Artillery, Captain Peter della Torre; the Ger position at Bee's Creek, and the surplus men were equipped as infantry, under Lieutenant T. W. Bolger, as a support for the guns there. Captain John T. Kanapaux remained in command of that post. An incident in the fight at Honey Hill in this Lafayette detachment is worth recording, showing the character and military spirit of the men. Sergeant Julius A. LePrince was at one of the guns; he was a sufferer from chills and fever, and that was the alternate day for his attack; sure enough, in the
James C. Furman (search for this): chapter 1.13
l as captain, for service in Colonel Maxcy Gregg's infantry regiment. It soon attracted a large membership, and the lieutenants were: G. W. Holtzclaw, first; W. E. Earle, second; James Furman, third. There being need for artillerists, Colonel Gregg consented to release the command; in numbers it was large enough for two companies. Captain W. H. Campbell was promoted major, and Lieutenants Holtzclaw and Earle were made captains. Captain Earle's company as a compliment was named for Dr. James C. Furman, a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of Greenville city. Its three officers were Lieutenants James Furman, a son of Dr. Furman; E. H. Graham, Jr., S. S. Kirby (Citadel, 1860), and Anderson. (In United States War Records and other war publications Earle's Battery is not reported at Honey Hill—a strange neglect and unexplained.) The battery at Honey Hill had Lieutenant Kirby sick in the hospital, and Lieutenant Anderson absent on leave. Sergeant J. P. Scruggs, acting lieutena
S. S. Kirby (search for this): chapter 1.13
made captains. Captain Earle's company as a compliment was named for Dr. James C. Furman, a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of Greenville city. Its three officers were Lieutenants James Furman, a son of Dr. Furman; E. H. Graham, Jr., S. S. Kirby (Citadel, 1860), and Anderson. (In United States War Records and other war publications Earle's Battery is not reported at Honey Hill—a strange neglect and unexplained.) The battery at Honey Hill had Lieutenant Kirby sick in the hospital, Lieutenant Kirby sick in the hospital, and Lieutenant Anderson absent on leave. Sergeant J. P. Scruggs, acting lieutenant, was in charge of a gun on the extreme left of the line, commanded by Major John Jenkins. The other guns, with those of the Beaufort and Lafayettes, were in battery at the head of the Grahamville road. Earle's Battery was in a number of engagements on the coast line during the war; did tours of duty at Fort Sumter and at Battery Wagner, and was with the army when it surrendered at Goldsboro, N. C. In conclus
nds would be interesting to the South Carolina public, I write this communication. Beaufort Volunteer Artillery (Stuart's Battery). Our historian, the late William Gilmore Sims, is authority for the statement that this command was founded in 1776, and served during the war for independence; it was on duty at the siege of Charleston, and of course, was included in the surrender of May, 1780. The commanders from 1776-1865 have been Captains Burke, Henry, Grayson Zealy, George P. Elliott, B.1776-1865 have been Captains Burke, Henry, Grayson Zealy, George P. Elliott, B. J. Johnson, J. G. Barnwell, Stephen Elliott, Jr., H. M. Stuart. In the early days of this organization its services were presumably for heavy artillery, a similar organization existing in Charleston at the same period, and now maintained only as a social one, The Charleston Ancient Artillery. As far back as present memories go, the company had field pieces, but did not use horses. The light battery gun drill was kept up, and the members were familiar with the light artillery manoeuvres, th
November 30th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.13
of the officers of the civil war in England, as having the essential military requisites of the quick eye, cool head and stout heart. He and his efficient cannoneers, at the head of the Grahamville road, certainly made a splendid record on November 30, 1864, at Honey Hill. As soon as the carpet-bag government of South Carolina ended, and Governor Hampton took charge of the Executive office, the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery reorganized, under Captain Stuart, and still continues in State servicought not to be here; go the rear! But the sergeant quietly remarked: If I go to the rear, shaking as I am, people might think I am scared! He stayed by his gun until the action was over, late in the evening. My youthful friend of November 30, 1864, as modest as he was brave, who was then scarcely of military age, is now among the Survivors with streaks of silver in his hair; he will, I hope, excuse me for publicly recording how he did his duty to South Carolina and the South, und
October 22nd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.13
ats, in which the company record was maintained on the highest plain, notably in the unequal fight at Pocotaligo. I cannot write of the Beaufort Artillery in this fight without further mention of it. I therefore digress for the purpose of showing the character of the defence of our coast line; the heavy odds encountered in every effort of the enemy to break our lines. This was by no means the only affair of the kind; many similar attacks were made, but uniformly defeated. On the 22d of October, 1862, a Federal column under General Brennan, consisting of the following commands, advanced to seize the railroad at that point. From that valuable contribution to our war history, A Sketch of the Charleston Light Dragoons, by Captain E. L. Wells, a member of that veteran corps, we get the names of these several regiments, batteries, etc.: Infantry, 47th, 54th, 76th Pennsylvania, 3d, 4th New Hampshire, 5th, 6th Connecticut, 3d Rhode Island, 48th New York; nine regiments, say 400 men
November 7th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.13
esent memories go, the company had field pieces, but did not use horses. The light battery gun drill was kept up, and the members were familiar with the light artillery manoeuvres, the mechanism of guns, carriages, caissons, and familiar with the different projectiles in use according to the United States artillery manual of that date. The high character of its membership, and its efficiency gave it prominence at the opening of the war between the States. At the Battle of Port Royal, November 7, 1861, this command, under Captain Stephen Elliott, Jr., (later brigadiergen-eral, C. S. A.) was assigned to duty on the Bay Point side of the harbor, and it was the only artillery garrison on that side. Colonel Dunovant's infantry regiment was in the rear of the fort as a supporting force, but took no part in the action. The lieutenants were Baker, Rhodes and Stuart. No reference to the Port Royal battle can properly be made without mention of the artillery garrison on the Hilton Head s
November 20th, 1898 AD (search for this): chapter 1.13
Heroes of Honey Hill. [from the Charleston, S. C., Sunday news, Nov. 20, 1898.] Magnificent work of the field Artillery. Brief sketches of Stuart's, Kanapaux's and Earle's Batteries—An enemy's praise of the conduct of the Confederates and their management of the Fight—Splendid discipline of the infantry, cavalry and Artillery forces engaged. [Reference may be made to preceding articles by Hon. William A. Courtenay, ante pp. 52 and 62. This was received from the accomplished writer since they were printed although it preceded them in the date of original publication. Whilst the articles are mutually illustrative they are not affected in their value by being printed as they are in this volume. Major Courtenay writes as to the artillery heroes of the Battle of Honey Hill: It was just wonderful what the boys did—Why, a rabbit could not have crossed the road. —Ed.] It is remarkable enough to be particularly mentioned that field pieces from three separate commands sh
November 7th (search for this): chapter 1.13
e found, and with the aid of native labor from the adjoining plantations, and garrisoned by a few hundred citizens—militia, who had never known a harder service than the weariness of a Governor's review. And still stranger that the neighboring population went on quietly with their accustomed life—not a household disturbed, not a piece of property removed—and all waited with undisturbed confidence the result of this desperate contest; but so it was. The attack opened soon after sunrise on November 7th, and for many hours the forts were exposed to a fire which, even in the annals of this war, was almost unparalleled. It was soon evident that all the soldiers could do was to show their powers of endurance; for by midday the forts were demolished, the guns dismounted, and the fleet safe within the lines of defence. Soon after the abandonment of Bay Point, the Beaufort Artillery was thoroughly equipped as a light battery, and did most effective service on the coast line or defence, bei<
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