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G. Linstedt (search for this): chapter 1.13
nd it was the only artillery garrison on that side. Colonel Dunovant's infantry regiment was in the rear of the fort as a supporting force, but took no part in the action. The lieutenants were Baker, Rhodes and Stuart. No reference to the Port Royal battle can properly be made without mention of the artillery garrison on the Hilton Head side, which comprised the German Artillery batallion, Colonel John A. Wagener, from Charleston; Company A, Captain D. Werner, Lieutenants D. Leseman, G. Linstedt, F. W. Wagener; Company B, Captain H. Harms, Lieutenants F. Melchers, B. Meyerhoff (killed), H. Klatte; who as bravely shared the honors and sacrifices of that day. In 1871 General John A. Wagener was elected Mayor of Charleston by a very complimentary vote. The Federal fleet of eighteen ships, carrying 200 guns, sailed around an eliptical course, between the shore batteries, delivering their broadsides with terrible effect against the Bay Point and Hilton Head forts. It was a day of
H. M. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.13
aly, George P. Elliott, B. J. Johnson, J. G. Barnwell, Stephen Elliott, Jr., H. M. Stuart. In the early days of this organization its services were presumably for he force, but took no part in the action. The lieutenants were Baker, Rhodes and Stuart. No reference to the Port Royal battle can properly be made without mention ught together for the fight at Honey Hill, was the best introduction for Captain H. M. Stuart to the command of the artillery there. He was everywhere regarded as a f the Executive office, the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery reorganized, under Captain Stuart, and still continues in State service. The Lafayette Artillery (Kanapauxrmy when it surrendered at Goldsboro, N. C. In conclusion, I remark that Captain Stuart was fortunate in his command, having the entire confidence of the well-drilU. S. A.) book we get an idea of the confusion and demoralization caused by Captain Stuart and his artillerists at the head of the road after three hours service of h
orce engaged—in killed and wounded; the Federal losses are believed to have been three times as many. But to return to my narrative of the Beaufort Artillery. Three years of active service on the coast, with and near the other commands brought together for the fight at Honey Hill, was the best introduction for Captain H. M. Stuart to the command of the artillery there. He was everywhere regarded as a brave soldier and experienced, steady fighter, and might have been aptly described, as Macaulay alluded to some of the officers of the civil war in England, as having the essential military requisites of the quick eye, cool head and stout heart. He and his efficient cannoneers, at the head of the Grahamville road, certainly made a splendid record on November 30, 1864, at Honey Hill. As soon as the carpet-bag government of South Carolina ended, and Governor Hampton took charge of the Executive office, the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery reorganized, under Captain Stuart, and still conti
William Wirt Henry (search for this): chapter 1.13
iculars of each of these artillery commands would be interesting to the South Carolina public, I write this communication. Beaufort Volunteer Artillery (Stuart's Battery). Our historian, the late William Gilmore Sims, is authority for the statement that this command was founded in 1776, and served during the war for independence; it was on duty at the siege of Charleston, and of course, was included in the surrender of May, 1780. The commanders from 1776-1865 have been Captains Burke, Henry, Grayson Zealy, George P. Elliott, B. J. Johnson, J. G. Barnwell, Stephen Elliott, Jr., H. M. Stuart. In the early days of this organization its services were presumably for heavy artillery, a similar organization existing in Charleston at the same period, and now maintained only as a social one, The Charleston Ancient Artillery. As far back as present memories go, the company had field pieces, but did not use horses. The light battery gun drill was kept up, and the members were familia
two sections, four guns, 1st regiment, United States regulars, three howitzers, manned by sailors, eleven guns. It is safe to estimate the total force at 4,000 men. The Confederate force was, by actual count, 405 men for duty, under the command of Colonel W. S. Walker, who earned the sobriquet of Live Oak in this fight, and was subsequently promoted brigadier general. The Charleston Light Dragoons, dismounted as infantry, Captain B. H. Rutledge; Lieutenants R. H. Colcock, L. C. Nowell, James W. O'Hear; Rutledge Mounted Riflemen (on foot), Captain W. L. Trenholm, Lieutenants Legare, J. Walker, first; Ed. H. Barnwell, second; John C. Warley, third. This command was armed with breech-loading carbines, very thoroughly equipped, and in a very high state of discipline. I heard an inspecting officer speak once of the clean condition of the carbines, that he thought a white cambric handkerchief could be passed through the barrel without soiling. Beaufort (Elliott's) Light Battery,
t; then quickly followed the burning of Atlanta, the fall of Savannah, the burning of Columbia, Averysboro, Bentonville and the surrenders at Goldsboro and Appomattox! The Confederate armies! how memory goes back to their wonderful achievements! Their high soldierly qualities! Their whole career, marked by a virile spirit; a decisive energy; a brave persistence; a patient endurance, which reflect the high military qualities of the men of the same race, kin beyond sea, who won victory for Wolfe at Quebec! Made Ingliss hold Lucknow against fearful odds! and who planted the Cross of St. George on the walls of Delhi, in the midst of the mutiny! If a like success did not attend finally the grand achievements of the soldiers of the South the causes may be traced, partly to disparity of numbers and resources, and partly to other serious disabilities of a different kind, which the loyalty of the armies to the flag and the forbearance of the people in their homes for the sake of The Ca
lines, and were reverberated from the surrounding forests. * * * As we approached, they took off their hats and shouted, Hurrah! Here's the 54th! Go in, boys; no loading in nine times there. At 1:30 o'clock I saw General Hatch speak to Colonel Bennett, chief of staff, who at once rode to me and said, Follow me. I replied, I would like a moment to close up my men, Colonel, when he said, in a most excited manner, General Hatch's orders are for you to follow me. Well, after Bennett's remarBennett's remark I had only to follow, which I did. Arriving near the section of artillery, he said, Go to the rear of that battery, file to the left and charge! I obeyed orders—all but the charging! On the right of the battery I looked around and found Lieutenant Reid and eight men. How the cannon shot tore down that hill and up that road. I could see where the 55th had charged and the dead lying there. Wagner always seemed to me the most terrible of our battles, but the musketry at Honey Hill! ( Georgi
Captain A. M. Manigault (search for this): chapter 1.13
ul. As a boy, I have often seen the company parading as infantry in that beautiful uniform; a prominent corps, and was part of the escort to Lafayette in 1824. About the year 1840 it changed its service to light artillery, and was the first light battery seen on the streets of Charleston with guns and horses; followed soon after by the Washington Artillery, Captain Peter della Torre; the German Artillery, Captain John A. Wagener, and, after the Mexican War, the Marion Artillery, Captain A. M. Manigault. Not only was the Lafayettes the pioneer light battery in Charleston, but it was kept up with esprit de corps, and was a well-drilled artillery company. At the opening of the war between States, it went into service under J. T. Kanapaux, a son of the early captain, Charles Kanapaux. The records of the corps have been lost or destroyed, so that a full roster of commanders is not possible, but the following names are recalled: Victor Durand, Charles Kanapaux, Peter B. Lalane, A.
ions, four guns, 1st regiment, United States regulars, three howitzers, manned by sailors, eleven guns. It is safe to estimate the total force at 4,000 men. The Confederate force was, by actual count, 405 men for duty, under the command of Colonel W. S. Walker, who earned the sobriquet of Live Oak in this fight, and was subsequently promoted brigadier general. The Charleston Light Dragoons, dismounted as infantry, Captain B. H. Rutledge; Lieutenants R. H. Colcock, L. C. Nowell, James W. O'Hear; Rutledge Mounted Riflemen (on foot), Captain W. L. Trenholm, Lieutenants Legare, J. Walker, first; Ed. H. Barnwell, second; John C. Warley, third. This command was armed with breech-loading carbines, very thoroughly equipped, and in a very high state of discipline. I heard an inspecting officer speak once of the clean condition of the carbines, that he thought a white cambric handkerchief could be passed through the barrel without soiling. Beaufort (Elliott's) Light Battery, four gun
L. F. LeBleux (search for this): chapter 1.13
een lost or destroyed, so that a full roster of commanders is not possible, but the following names are recalled: Victor Durand, Charles Kanapaux, Peter B. Lalane, A. Roumillat, Gustavus Follin, Charles Emile Kanapaux, J. J. Pope. From the beginning of the century, the French element of Charleston's population has been uniformly public-spirited and devoted to the best interests of city and State. The following were officers in 1861: Captain John T. Kanapaux; Lieutenants M. P. O'Connor, L. F. LeBleux, G. W. Aimar, A. Victor Kanapaux. By assignment to special duties and other causes, changes occurred during the war, and at the date of the Honey Hill battle (1864) the following were commissioned officers: Captain John T. Kanapaux; Lieutenants, senior first, C. J. Zealy; junior first, A. Victor Kanapaux; second, T. W. Bolger. Two guns and thirty-six men, under Lieutenant Zealy, were detached from Bee's Creek Battery and sent to Honey Hill. No passing commendation does justice to th
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