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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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A. S. Hartwell (search for this): chapter 1.13
road after three hours service of his guns. I quote: The 35th United States colored troops, Colonel Barber, charged up the road; it went forward with a cheer, but receiving a terrible fire, after some loss, was forced to retire. * * * Colonel Hartwell, with eight companies 55th Massachusetts, ordered a charge in double column. Twice forced to fall back by the enemy's fire, their brave colonel gave the command, Follow your colors! and himself led a charge on horseback; the 55th turned the bend, rushed up the road, and in the face of a deadly fire advanced up to the creek. But it was fruitless; the pitiless shot and shell so decimated the ranks that the survivors retired, after losing over one hundred men in five minutes! Colonel Hartwell, wounded and pinned to the ground by his dead horse, was rescued and dragged to the woods. * * The noise of the battle at this time was terrific; the artillery crashing away in the centre, while volley after volley of musketry ran down both li
George P. Elliott (search for this): chapter 1.13
illery commands would be interesting to the South Carolina public, I write this communication. Beaufort Volunteer Artillery (Stuart's Battery). Our historian, the late William Gilmore Sims, is authority for the statement that this command was founded in 1776, and served during the war for independence; it was on duty at the siege of Charleston, and of course, was included in the surrender of May, 1780. The commanders from 1776-1865 have been Captains Burke, Henry, Grayson Zealy, George P. Elliott, B. J. Johnson, J. G. Barnwell, Stephen Elliott, Jr., H. M. Stuart. In the early days of this organization its services were presumably for heavy artillery, a similar organization existing in Charleston at the same period, and now maintained only as a social one, The Charleston Ancient Artillery. As far back as present memories go, the company had field pieces, but did not use horses. The light battery gun drill was kept up, and the members were familiar with the light artillery m
hat the particulars of each of these artillery commands would be interesting to the South Carolina public, I write this communication. Beaufort Volunteer Artillery (Stuart's Battery). Our historian, the late William Gilmore Sims, is authority for the statement that this command was founded in 1776, and served during the war for independence; it was on duty at the siege of Charleston, and of course, was included in the surrender of May, 1780. The commanders from 1776-1865 have been Captains Burke, Henry, Grayson Zealy, George P. Elliott, B. J. Johnson, J. G. Barnwell, Stephen Elliott, Jr., H. M. Stuart. In the early days of this organization its services were presumably for heavy artillery, a similar organization existing in Charleston at the same period, and now maintained only as a social one, The Charleston Ancient Artillery. As far back as present memories go, the company had field pieces, but did not use horses. The light battery gun drill was kept up, and the members w
utledge Mounted Riflemen (on foot), Captain W. L. Trenholm, Lieutenants Legare, J. Walker, first; Ed. H. Barnwell, second; John C. Warley, third. This command was armed with breech-loading carbines, very thoroughly equipped, and in a very high state of discipline. I heard an inspecting officer speak once of the clean condition of the carbines, that he thought a white cambric handkerchief could be passed through the barrel without soiling. Beaufort (Elliott's) Light Battery, four guns. Lampkin's (Va.) Light Battery, four pieces. Major Morgan, with two companies of cavalry. Captain Izard's company, of the 11th regiment, infantry. Captain Joseph Blythe Allston's company, of Abney battalion of sharpshooters. Charleston was well represented at Pocotaligo, a battle of most desperate character in attack and defence! for a part of the day the field pieces were engaged at the short range of from sixty to eighty yards; the odds were ten to one, but the enemy finally abandoned the
John C. Warley (search for this): chapter 1.13
al force at 4,000 men. The Confederate force was, by actual count, 405 men for duty, under the command of Colonel W. S. Walker, who earned the sobriquet of Live Oak in this fight, and was subsequently promoted brigadier general. The Charleston Light Dragoons, dismounted as infantry, Captain B. H. Rutledge; Lieutenants R. H. Colcock, L. C. Nowell, James W. O'Hear; Rutledge Mounted Riflemen (on foot), Captain W. L. Trenholm, Lieutenants Legare, J. Walker, first; Ed. H. Barnwell, second; John C. Warley, third. This command was armed with breech-loading carbines, very thoroughly equipped, and in a very high state of discipline. I heard an inspecting officer speak once of the clean condition of the carbines, that he thought a white cambric handkerchief could be passed through the barrel without soiling. Beaufort (Elliott's) Light Battery, four guns. Lampkin's (Va.) Light Battery, four pieces. Major Morgan, with two companies of cavalry. Captain Izard's company, of the 11th regime
Charles Emile Kanapaux (search for this): chapter 1.13
tes the pioneer light battery in Charleston, but it was kept up with esprit de corps, and was a well-drilled artillery company. At the opening of the war between States, it went into service under J. T. Kanapaux, a son of the early captain, Charles Kanapaux. The records of the corps have been lost or destroyed, so that a full roster of commanders is not possible, but the following names are recalled: Victor Durand, Charles Kanapaux, Peter B. Lalane, A. Roumillat, Gustavus Follin, Charles Emile Kanapaux, J. J. Pope. From the beginning of the century, the French element of Charleston's population has been uniformly public-spirited and devoted to the best interests of city and State. The following were officers in 1861: Captain John T. Kanapaux; Lieutenants M. P. O'Connor, L. F. LeBleux, G. W. Aimar, A. Victor Kanapaux. By assignment to special duties and other causes, changes occurred during the war, and at the date of the Honey Hill battle (1864) the following were commissioned o
W. E. Earle (search for this): chapter 1.13
Brief sketches of Stuart's, Kanapaux's and Earle's Batteries—An enemy's praise of the conduct o inquired for me; he introduced himself as Captain Earle; said that his light battery had been ordend arrived. In the course of conversation Captain Earle remarked upon the disabilities encounteredip thus begun lasted uninterruptedly until Captain Earle's recent lamented death. The company known during the war as Earle's Battery was organized in August, 1861, by (Rev.) W. H. Campbell as cae lieutenants were: G. W. Holtzclaw, first; W. E. Earle, second; James Furman, third. There being promoted major, and Lieutenants Holtzclaw and Earle were made captains. Captain Earle's company aCaptain Earle's company as a compliment was named for Dr. James C. Furman, a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of Greenv States War Records and other war publications Earle's Battery is not reported at Honey Hill—a stra battery at the head of the Grahamville road. Earle's Battery was in a number of engagements on th[2 more...]<
Victor Durand (search for this): chapter 1.13
Mexican War, the Marion Artillery, Captain A. M. Manigault. Not only was the Lafayettes the pioneer light battery in Charleston, but it was kept up with esprit de corps, and was a well-drilled artillery company. At the opening of the war between States, it went into service under J. T. Kanapaux, a son of the early captain, Charles Kanapaux. The records of the corps have been lost or destroyed, so that a full roster of commanders is not possible, but the following names are recalled: Victor Durand, Charles Kanapaux, Peter B. Lalane, A. Roumillat, Gustavus Follin, Charles Emile Kanapaux, J. J. Pope. From the beginning of the century, the French element of Charleston's population has been uniformly public-spirited and devoted to the best interests of city and State. The following were officers in 1861: Captain John T. Kanapaux; Lieutenants M. P. O'Connor, L. F. LeBleux, G. W. Aimar, A. Victor Kanapaux. By assignment to special duties and other causes, changes occurred during the
T. E. Morgan (search for this): chapter 1.13
L. Trenholm, Lieutenants Legare, J. Walker, first; Ed. H. Barnwell, second; John C. Warley, third. This command was armed with breech-loading carbines, very thoroughly equipped, and in a very high state of discipline. I heard an inspecting officer speak once of the clean condition of the carbines, that he thought a white cambric handkerchief could be passed through the barrel without soiling. Beaufort (Elliott's) Light Battery, four guns. Lampkin's (Va.) Light Battery, four pieces. Major Morgan, with two companies of cavalry. Captain Izard's company, of the 11th regiment, infantry. Captain Joseph Blythe Allston's company, of Abney battalion of sharpshooters. Charleston was well represented at Pocotaligo, a battle of most desperate character in attack and defence! for a part of the day the field pieces were engaged at the short range of from sixty to eighty yards; the odds were ten to one, but the enemy finally abandoned the field, and retreated to their water base, prote
caissons, and familiar with the different projectiles in use according to the United States artillery manual of that date. The high character of its membership, and its efficiency gave it prominence at the opening of the war between the States. At the Battle of Port Royal, November 7, 1861, this command, under Captain Stephen Elliott, Jr., (later brigadiergen-eral, C. S. A.) was assigned to duty on the Bay Point side of the harbor, and it was the only artillery garrison on that side. Colonel Dunovant's infantry regiment was in the rear of the fort as a supporting force, but took no part in the action. The lieutenants were Baker, Rhodes and Stuart. No reference to the Port Royal battle can properly be made without mention of the artillery garrison on the Hilton Head side, which comprised the German Artillery batallion, Colonel John A. Wagener, from Charleston; Company A, Captain D. Werner, Lieutenants D. Leseman, G. Linstedt, F. W. Wagener; Company B, Captain H. Harms, Lieutenant
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