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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Contreras (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
l; 12. Alex. P. Stewart; 16. Martin L. Smith; 17. John Pope; 24. Abner Doubleday; 28. D. H. Hill; 40. R. H. Anderson; 41. Geo. W. Lay; 48. Lafayette McLaws; 52. Earl Van Dorn; 54. James Longstreet. He was assigned to the engineer corps and stationed at West Point as assistant professor of engineering until September 24, 1846, when he took the field in General Scott's column in Mexico and served until May 22, 1848; he was breveted for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and for gallant conduct at Contreras and Cherubusco; was promoted captain of engineers. After the Mexican war he served on the coast defences. He resigned December 15, 1854, and with General Quitman, was engaged in preparations for a military expedition in Cuba, but this was abandoned. In 1856 he took charge of the large iron interests of Cooper, Hewitt & Co. at Trenton, N. J. When Fernando Wood was elected mayor of New York he induced General Smith to accept the position of street commissioner, which he held until May,
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
neral W. J. Hardee, with headquarters at Savannah, Georgia; Major-General Samuel Jones, second in cldier was on the coast between Charleston and Savannah after that date, except Company E, 11th S. C.ame to military authorities at Charleston and Savannah and to Major John Jenkins, at Pocataligo. (2)road to Grahamville is at right angles to the Savannah road, and Honey Hill is distant about two milarched from the landing, and occupied the old Savannah dirt road, near Bolan's Church, as shown on tts, 2 O'Clock A. M., November 30, 1864, at Savannah, Ga. I make these extracts from General Smits from North and South Carolina, intended for Savannah, would arrive. In this interview I showed yol reports that the movement of troops through Savannah to South Carolina was settled upon between Gethe department headquarters at Charleston and Savannah by Lientenant Fraser, assistant adjutant-geneCoosawhatchie, but the main body took the old Savannah stage road, and occupied the ground for more [6 more...]
Pontiac (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
unequal field. * * * * * The Genesis of the fight at Honey Hill. General Sherman's column was on its march to the sea, and on November 11th he telegraphed General Halleck: I would like to have Foster break the Charleston and Savannah Railroad about Pocataligo about the 1st of December. Later in the month the following detail was made, which was ready on the 28th of November, and some troops did embark on that day. United States forces, Army and Navy. Gunboats.—Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona and Wissahickon. Naval Brigade.—Composed of 500 sailors and marines, with twelve howitzers for duty ashore; Commander George H. Preble. Artillery.—Batteries B and F, 3d New York, and Battery A, 3d Rhode Island, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel William Ames. Infantry.—General E. E. Potter's 1st brigade. New York regiments, 56th, 127th, 144th, 157th; Ohio regiment, 25th; United States colored troops, 32d, 34th, 35th regiments; Colonel A. S. Hartwell's 2d brigade.
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
hie, and unless vigorously opposed would undoubtedly break the road at one or both of those points soon after daylight, and that the only force that you had in your whole command, which could by any possibility be brought upon the ground in time was two regular Confederate regiments from Charleston, and you believed these would be there too late, and that if I could hold the enemy in check until 2 o'clock P. M., and prevent them cutting the road before that time, several thousand troops from North and South Carolina, intended for Savannah, would arrive. In this interview I showed you my qualified authority from the Governor (Joseph E. Brown) to withdraw the Georgia State forces, under my command, from Confederate service in case they were ordered beyond the limits of the State. After a full conference with yourself I was perfectly satisfied that for the purpose intended it was right and proper the movement should be made, and I gave orders accordingly. Notwithstanding some objecti
Hampton county (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
arrived at Honey Hill November 30, 8 o'clock A. M. Company C—James M. Gregorie, captain; Jos. M. Farr, first lieutenant (commanding); T. Heyward Howard, second lieutenant (on other duty); Wm. N. Heyward, third lieutenant; (from Beaufort county), 20 men. A detachment on outpost duty in the vicinity, which assembled and reported for duty—Company E, H. C. Raysor, captain; J. P. Youmans, first lieutenant; H. W. Jaudon, second lieutenant; Isaac Bostick, third lieutenant; (from what is now Hampton county), 80 men—were at Pocataligo and ordered to Bee's Creek on 29th; went there promptly; advanced towards Boyd's until enemy was in sight and remained there until evening, actively skirmishing with head of naval brigade, which had advanced in that direction from the landing—by taking the wrong road. Company I—John Lawson Seabrook, captain; T. Warren Mikell, first lieutenant; John M. Jenkins, second lieutenant; Benj. Bailey, third lieutenant; (from Charleston and neighboring sea islands
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
ficers and men on duty may well be remarked upon here. The rapid growth of the Confederate army to large dimensions soon exhausted the roster of graduates from West Point, Annapolis, Virginia Military Institute and Citadel Academy, then the only sources from which to secure educated military men. Relative to the whole number of os from Georgia, who, by their gallant co-operation, made the victory of Honey Hill possible. General G. W. Smith was a native of Kentucky, and graduated from West Point in the class of 1842. I append the order of general merit at graduation of (subsequently) prominent members of that class, as a fitting introduction to this inl; 40. R. H. Anderson; 41. Geo. W. Lay; 48. Lafayette McLaws; 52. Earl Van Dorn; 54. James Longstreet. He was assigned to the engineer corps and stationed at West Point as assistant professor of engineering until September 24, 1846, when he took the field in General Scott's column in Mexico and served until May 22, 1848; he was
Bee's Creek (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
(from what is now Hampton county), 80 men—were at Pocataligo and ordered to Bee's Creek on 29th; went there promptly; advanced towards Boyd's until enemy was in siganapaux; Second Lieutenant T. W. Bolger (from Charleston)—4 guns, 135 men—at Bee's Creek field works. Bachman's Battery, A. N. V. (had been recently ordered back to report at or near Boyd's Landing, and another night ride brought them to Bee's Creek works before daylight. From there Captain Campbell proceeded to Honey Hill. find the enemy. Captain Raysor says: I proceeded forthwith; when I reached Bee's Creek in the afternoon I met some of Captain Peepie's vedettes falling back, who howitzers, moved by hand, landed early and advanced to the road (leading to Bee's Creek) and pushed a small force to the right, which met a few of the enemy, etc. Tgan advancing in the afternoon, some, by mistake, as it appears, towards the Bee's Creek battery, covering the railroad at Coosawhatchie, but the main body took the
Grahamville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
olina cavalry, with headquarters at Grahamville, South Carolina. Lieutenant E. W. Fraser, A. A. G., sent a courier to district headquarters at Grahamville, announcing the presence of the enemy in foand as soon as he learned the news, rode to Grahamville in the cab of a locomotive specially fired antry force, was on the way and would be at Grahamville at sunrise, 30th. Major Jenkins also re, at once mounted his horse and started for Grahamville, stopping at Mr. Bostick's on the way to anafayette Artillery from Bee's creek towards Grahamville, leaving three guns in the field works at ttion to Savannah; at that point the road to Grahamville is at right angles to the Savannah road, an and without rations. The train arrived at Grahamville very early in the morning, just after daylimarch. We finally started, passing through Grahamville to the breastworks at Honey Hill. The men d's Landing. Captain Peeples had arrived at Grahamville on the evening of November 28, and bivouack[15 more...]
Purysburg (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
Landing, and another night ride brought them to Bee's Creek works before daylight. From there Captain Campbell proceeded to Honey Hill. From John's Island, where Company B was on duty, was seventy miles by the most available roads. (2) On the other side of Honey Hill, Earle's Battery was on duty on May River, near Bluffton. The battery received orders at 5 P. M. on the 29th to move promptly to Grahamville, and in a few minutes took the upper road and, passing through Hardeeville and Purysburg, arrived at Grahamville railroad depot before daybreak of the 30th; after feeding the horses and breakfasting the men, the battery proceeded to Honey Hill, several miles distant, arriving there at sunrise. After an all-night march of thirty-five miles and without rest, they went into action. In the United States war records and in other accounts Earle's Battery is not recorded as engaged. It is mentioned here for the first time in print. Topography—concentration of troops. From B
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
having entirely failed in its only object, the capture of Richmond. They had, too, looked on for months at the unequal conflict in Georgia; had seen the mistake of removing General Joseph E. Johnston from the command of that devoted army of the West, with its lofty spirit and enduring heart; followed by the fall of Atlanta; and, finally, had witnessed the only army possibly available for the defence of three States, inexplicably—most strangely—dispatched in pursuit of a military mirage in Tennessee, where it was practically destroyed. All lost! but by the graves Where martyred heroes rest, He wins the most who honor saves— Success is not the test. All lost! but e'en defeat Hath triumphs of her own, Wrong's paean hath no note so sweet As trampled Right's proud moan. It is a singular coincidence that the battle of Franklin was fought on the same day as Honey Hill. The people of Carolina and Georgia clearly realized the great disaster impending over their States; they knew the f<
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