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uppose later to show with the proofs thereof. The time at which General Gordon speaks in his book of being commanded to halt was just at that time when Hay's and Hoke's Brigade (under Colonel Avery), and Captain Carrington's Artillery was being brought forward by Early on Gordon's left to capture Heckman's battery and to repulseal. I suppose they were all occupied elsewhere. In ten or fifteen minutes perhaps, some of Hay's Brigade made their appearance upon our left, and on their left Hoke's Brigade soon came up. In a few moments afterwards the fight began again, in which Gordon's, Hoke's and Hay's brigades participated, and, I think, a part of GenerHoke's and Hay's brigades participated, and, I think, a part of General Hill's corps, on our right. The wild Confederate yell was soon heard by us, indicating victory. I rode a little further with my battery, and it seemed to me, as a youthful soldier, in the confusion, that the whole Federal army was routed. Such an impression speedily grew among my men and those about us. Much to my delight an
Hilary P. Jones (search for this): chapter 1.34
sburg, I was captain of what was known as The Charlottesville Artillery. and commanded it in that momentous struggle. This battery was one of four which composed Jones' Battalion, the other three being Courtney Artillery, Captain W. A. Tanner; Louisiana Guard Artillery, Captain C. A. Green, and the Staunton Artillery, Captain A. ng of June 30th, we left York and moved along the turnpike towards Heddlersburg. After resting that night near that village, Early's Division, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hilary P. Jones' Battalion of Artillery accompanying it, marched toward Gettysburg, which was south of us, and near which we could hear the roar of the battle, in wysburg, which was situated on the slope approaching Cemetery Hill, and was about twelve hundred or fourteen hundred yards distant. The other three batteries of Jones' Battalion had been ordered a short distance to the left of the road and immediately went into action, firing at Federal batteries that were coming into position o
s in line of battle, ready to meet the enemy. This was done with wonderful quickness and skill, but the enemy did not advance upon us. There were no other incidents that I remember worthy of mention during the day. Gordon, Early, Ewell (?), Longstreet and Lee. I do not think General Gordon ever intended in his book, to say anything that might reflect upon the memory or reputation of his two distinguished comrades, Generals Ewell and Early, for it would be directly in opposition to the spirit indicated in his article, where he speaks of General Longstreet, and says: It is a source of profound regret that he and his friends should have been into such unprofitable and ill tempered controversy with the friends of our immortal chieftain. He does, however, speak as follows: On the first day neither General Early nor General Ewell could possibly have been fully cognizant of the situation at the time I was ordered to halt. Then General Gordon goes on and describes the scene,
eing commanded to halt was just at that time when Hay's and Hoke's Brigade (under Colonel Avery), and Captain Carrington's Artillery was being brought forward by Early on Gordon's left to capture Heckman's battery and to repulse the troops of General Custar, who were very troublesome at that juncture. The gallant Louisianians and North Carolinians did capture the guns and hurled back Custar's troops, but are not given even a scant reference by General Gordon in his book, although they were the Custar's troops, but are not given even a scant reference by General Gordon in his book, although they were the adjacent troops of the division to which he belonged; nor does he give his division commanded any credit for the rapid and vigorous movement by which he accomplished this result. While Major-General Rodes, his comrade on many fields, and Brigadier-General Hayes, of Louisiana, likewise his comrade on many fields, fought gallantly and effectively on that day, the one to the right and the one to the left of him, so far as General Gordon's book is concerned, one would not know that these men ever e
June 2nd, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.34
admiration for that distinguished officer. I believe he was the best citizen soldier of the war. If he had been educated at West Point, great as his achievements were, there is no telling what more he might have accomplished in the military line. He was daring and absolutely fearless in battle, and a most thorough and accomplished gentleman. General Early's enforced contribution. When we went into Pennsylvania, of course, my battery moved with Early's Division, and we finally, on June 2, 1863, landed in the Fair Grounds of York, without any incident worthy of mention here. In that city we were treated with much kindness by many of its citizens, and there I met friends and acquaintances who were cordial and hospitable. General Gordon, in his article in Scribner's of July 1903, refers to the fact that General Early levied a contribution upon the citizens of York to satisfy the urgent necessities of his men; but I do not know that he contracted to pay for these things some time
hings some time after the independence of the Confederacy. It sounds a little characteristic of the old general, and like one of his jokes. Perhapes he had faith in the ultimate independence of the Confederacy, and considered he was making an honest contract. Maybe it was attributed to him as many jokes were attributed to Mr. Lincoln without any foundation. However, I think it was a fact that his men were more comfortable when they left York than when they entered. On the morning of June 30th, we left York and moved along the turnpike towards Heddlersburg. After resting that night near that village, Early's Division, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hilary P. Jones' Battalion of Artillery accompanying it, marched toward Gettysburg, which was south of us, and near which we could hear the roar of the battle, in which Lieutenant-General Hill's corps had become engaged. On reaching a position, from which Gettysburg came in view, about a mile distant, we could see the battle raging on our
tended in his book, to say anything that might reflect upon the memory or reputation of his two distinguished comrades, Generals Ewell and Early, for it would be directly in opposition to the spirit indicated in his article, where he speaks of General Longstreet, and says: It is a source of profound regret that he and his friends should have been into such unprofitable and ill tempered controversy with the friends of our immortal chieftain. He does, however, speak as follows: On the first day neither General Early nor General Ewell could possibly have been fully cognizant of the situation at the time I was ordered to halt. Then General Gordon goes on and describes the scene, and says further: It is not surprising, from the full realization of the consequences of disobedience even then, but for the fact that the order to halt was accompanied by an explanation that General Lee was several miles away, and did not wish to give battle at Gettysburg. He then goes on with t
February 19th, 1905 AD (search for this): chapter 1.34
First day on left at Gettysburg. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 19, 1905. General Early's Adviceā€”An oft-repeated incident corroborated by a witness who was there. Major James McDowell Carrington tells a thrilling story of thrilling deeds. The article below is from the excellent pen of Major James McDowell Carrington, who in the battle of Gettysburg was captain of the Charlottesville Artillery, and is now a distinguished lawer of Washington city. The Major's statements confirm the close presence of General Early and Ewell on the field the first day at Gettysburg, and gives evidence as to one of the occasions upon which General Early advised an assault on Cemetery Hill that afternoon. Colonel Harry Gilmore, of Maryland, in his book, Four Years in the Saddle, tells almost identically the same story as Major Carrington. John G. Williams, Esq., a respected lawyer of high standing at Orange Courthouse, writes to the same effect on this topic, and I my
y it, and he only obeyed it because he thought it was in accordance with General Lee's wishes. With the memory of this great event before him, and the gallant and conspicuous part he had acted in it, I think General Gordon is pardonable for speaking in this enthusiastic way, without intending to accuse him of any reflection upon his departed comrades. Now, on the other hand, what did General Early say about the matter? He delivered an address before the Washington and Lee University in 1875 or 76, I think (if you have not a copy of this, you can find it in the Congressional Library), in which he uses this language: There was a time, as it appears now, immediately after the enemy was driven back, when, if we had advanced vigorously, the heights of Gettysburg would possibly have been taken. But that was not then apparent. I was in favor of the advance, but I thing it doubtful whether it would have been resulted in any greater advantage that to throw back the two routed corps
July, 1903 AD (search for this): chapter 1.34
attle, and a most thorough and accomplished gentleman. General Early's enforced contribution. When we went into Pennsylvania, of course, my battery moved with Early's Division, and we finally, on June 2, 1863, landed in the Fair Grounds of York, without any incident worthy of mention here. In that city we were treated with much kindness by many of its citizens, and there I met friends and acquaintances who were cordial and hospitable. General Gordon, in his article in Scribner's of July 1903, refers to the fact that General Early levied a contribution upon the citizens of York to satisfy the urgent necessities of his men; but I do not know that he contracted to pay for these things some time after the independence of the Confederacy. It sounds a little characteristic of the old general, and like one of his jokes. Perhapes he had faith in the ultimate independence of the Confederacy, and considered he was making an honest contract. Maybe it was attributed to him as many joke
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