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Mr. Wright's discovery of the Fells was not till 1864, when he came to live in Medford, and until 1880 his time was still pressed with other important work, but he did not forget the city's need of a epoch had so far got the better of his poverty that he was enabled during the years from 1870 to 1880 to purchase as his own contribution to the park some fifty or sixty acres of wild wood's. During of the ruling mammon powers, would take the matter up. But no independent effort was made, and in 1880 he put his own tits to work. His hearing before the city council was twelve years later than the day of Mr. Cleveland's urging, and yet in 1880 Mr. Hilliard's governmental hopelessness must still have been true, for before the more practical Metropolitan movers ventured into the legislature, twenty-four more years had been added to the twelve. In 1880, then, the situation would seem to demand a measure by which, without further loss or delay, it would be practical for the people, if they wi
April 2nd, 1890 AD (search for this): chapter 6
he passage which I have given, and which was written in the July of 1883, Mr. De las Casas takes leave of Mr. Wright with, His death was thought to have been hastened by overwork in this cause, and to be an irreparable loss to the whole movement. The agitation became more energetic when real estate speculators bought the woods along Ravine road, cut off the grand pines, land turned the scene of beauty into the hideousness of a logging camp. The Appalachian Club took up the matter, and April 2, 1890, appointed Charles Elliot, George C. Mann, and Rosewell B. Lawrence to arrange for a meeting of all persons interested in the preservation of scenery and historical sites in Massachusetts. And this meeting, according to Mr. De las Casas, by a sequence of other efforts and events, resulted in the Metropolitan Park law of 1893. Mr. Wright was a member of the Appalachian Club, and somewhere between 1881 and 1885 he had the pleasure of escorting a very large portion of the membership throug
October 15th, 1880 AD (search for this): chapter 6
behalf, vested the title of the Fells park in the commonwealth, and the park was to be held under unitary control, the Board of Agriculture acting as a Board of Forestry, in perpetuity for the benefit of the municipalities in which it was situated. It will be seen that, under this plan, there was not the same danger of defeat, or blocking to the wheels of its progress by the greed of owners, as there would have been had the Fells acreage not been wholly secured at the same time. On October 15, 1880, Mr. Wright called together some 200 people, and on Bear Hill in the Stoneham Fells formed a small association to devise plans and to discuss the means of carrying out any one that might be agreed upon. Two plans were sketched, Mr. Wright's and that of Wilson Flagg, who, years before Mr. Wright's discovery, had pleaded the Fells cause and made his own successless appeal to the government in behalf of its salvation as a Forest Conservatory, a wild, natural garden for the indigenous faun
Elizur Wright's work for the Middlesex Fells. By Ellen M. Wright. (Condensed.) No man, however gifted, sets his pen to work for right against might or mammon with any great chance of becoming anything but poorer, and in 1839, after seven crowded years of such work in the anti-slavery cause, two events occurred which brought Mr. Wright so near destitution that for a number of years his life was a hand-to-hand fight with the wolf at his door. In 1837, while secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York, he chanced, at De Behr's repository of foreign books, to come upon a cheap copy of La Fontaine's Fables in the French, with some 200 wood cuts in it. His little son, he tells us in his introduction to his translations, was just beginning to feel the intellectual magnetism of pictures, and, to please him, he bought the book. The pictures alone, however, were not enough to satisfy the child; he must have the stories, too; and from putting them into English by word of m
created, The public sentiment aroused by this agitation finally led to the Metropolitan Park System, he was writing history, not politics. The hearings before the City Council Committee took place in 1869. Of the General Court action, which in 1870 was the outcome of these hearings, Mr. Wright in his Appeal called The Park Question, wrote: The well-guarded Park bill of last year, which submitted the whole problem of the future beauty and grandeur of our city to a competent and impartial commng care to stimulate all the interest awakened, and before long a number of able writers had come to his laid. His literary and mathematical powers at this epoch had so far got the better of his poverty that he was enabled during the years from 1870 to 1880 to purchase as his own contribution to the park some fifty or sixty acres of wild wood's. During this ten years of effort for the Fells, in addition to labors which hardly gave him time to draw a long breath, Mr. Wright hoped that younger
September (search for this): chapter 6
illing to work should, without his aid or prompting, effect the other organizations. Such help was not forthcoming; and his last Forest Festival, held, I think, in 1885, the year of his death, had for its object so to strengthen his little Fells Association as to help him in gaining this help. In 1885, too, by his invitation, the National Forestry Congress was held in Boston. Towards its success, and still that of similar forest parks for other cities, he made every effort. This Was in September, and feeling his strength lessen, his work till the morning of his death was to see such men as he hoped after it might take his place. And on November 21 he died, bequeathing to the Metropolitan plan the success his own had earned, land with it, through the love of his children, the beautiful woods of Pine Hill and its neighborhood. After quoting the passage which I have given, and which was written in the July of 1883, Mr. De las Casas takes leave of Mr. Wright with, His death was th
that he sought—or had to seek; the men of soul came of their own accord, and, in so far as they were his anti-slavery co-workers, consisted of Theodore D. Weld, John G. Whittier, and Samuel E. Sewell. When Sylvester Baxter, in his Boston Park Guide, said of What Mr. Wright's persistence had created, The public sentiment aroused by this agitation finally led to the Metropolitan Park System, he was writing history, not politics. The hearings before the City Council Committee took place in 1869. Of the General Court action, which in 1870 was the outcome of these hearings, Mr. Wright in his Appeal called The Park Question, wrote: The well-guarded Park bill of last year, which submitted the whole problem of the future beauty and grandeur of our city to a competent and impartial commission, was defeated in the interest of projectors who have manifest private ends to serve. Everybody has private ends; and the public is not about to forego its own ends lest somebody should be privately
Elizur Wright's work for the Middlesex Fells. By Ellen M. Wright. (Condensed.) No man, however gifted, sets his pen to work for right against might or mammon with any great chance of becoming anything but poorer, and in 1839, after seven crowded years of such work in the anti-slavery cause, two events occurred which brought Mr. Wright so near destitution that for a number of years his life was a hand-to-hand fight with the wolf at his door. In 1837, while secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York, he chanced, at De Behr's repository of foreign books, to come upon a cheap copy of La Fontaine's Fables in the French, with some 200 wood cuts in it. His little son, he tells us in his introduction to his translations, was just beginning to feel the intellectual magnetism of pictures, and, to please him, he bought the book. The pictures alone, however, were not enough to satisfy the child; he must have the stories, too; and from putting them into English by word of m
imilar forest parks for other cities, he made every effort. This Was in September, and feeling his strength lessen, his work till the morning of his death was to see such men as he hoped after it might take his place. And on November 21 he died, bequeathing to the Metropolitan plan the success his own had earned, land with it, through the love of his children, the beautiful woods of Pine Hill and its neighborhood. After quoting the passage which I have given, and which was written in the July of 1883, Mr. De las Casas takes leave of Mr. Wright with, His death was thought to have been hastened by overwork in this cause, and to be an irreparable loss to the whole movement. The agitation became more energetic when real estate speculators bought the woods along Ravine road, cut off the grand pines, land turned the scene of beauty into the hideousness of a logging camp. The Appalachian Club took up the matter, and April 2, 1890, appointed Charles Elliot, George C. Mann, and Rosewell
n one occasion the same object, that you might as well try to persuade the Common Council to buy land in the moon as the Fells, his first step was this very trial. No man of the city's executive, who could be persuaded to go, but was taken through the Fells, and there seconded by the multitudinous facts of its glorious predestination. Mr. Wright urged its claims to be secured at once. When Mr. De las Casas, of the present Park Board, in his historical sketch for the New England Magazine of 1898, says of Mr. Wright, He was trained in his line of thought by association with the anti-slavery movement and by a residence in England, where he had watched the use of the common lands by the masses, he says truly, for the former had certainly taught him that until some determined man or leader of men, ready to wear the thorns, and let others take the laurels, has gone ahead to pave the way, the last thing the masses have anything to hope from is this mammon-ruled administration. Before it w
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