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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

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Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
leaves Alexandria, opposite Washington, and running southwesterly reaches Gordonsville, where it forks. One branch, following the same direction along the foot of the Blue Ridge, connects with the great Tennessee line at Lynchburg by way of Charlottesville; the other branch, bending to the east and running parallel with the tributaries of York River, strikes the first line again near one of these tributaries, and without merging into it, never leaves it until Richmond is reached. Two branches of the Alexandria and Lynchburg line switch off to enter the Valley of Virginia; one at Charlottesville, which debouches at Stanton, near the sources of the Shenandoah, and breaks off a little beyond that point; the other, much more to the north, at about forty-five kilometres from Alexandria, which ascends the valley after crossing the Blue Ridge at Manassas Gap. Hence the name of Manassas Junction, which is applied to the little plateau where this junction occurs near the stream of Bull Ru
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
the important line of railway he had abandoned a short time before, together with the positions of Harper's Ferry and Martinsburg. On the 2d of July he forded the Potomac at Williamsport, and, eight kilometres beyond that point, on the borders of re obliged, on the arrival of Abercrombie's brigade, to beat a speedy retreat, only stopping at Bunker's Hill, between Martinsburg and Winchester, where they found reinforcements forwarded in haste by Johnston. Patterson, on his part, was satisfied with this advantage, and believing that his troops were not in a condition to continue the campaign, stopped at Martinsburg, in order to secure his means of transportation and reorganize the 18,000 men he had then under his command. He thus left the latter started on the following day, and taking advantage of the neglect of Patterson, who had remained inactive at Martinsburg, he left Winchester quietly, and led his 8000 men by rapid marches to near Manassas Gap. As fast as they arrived ther
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
in a multitude of valleys. Except among the Alleghanies, no clearly defined division of waters ocaving this point, it follows the chain of the Alleghanies, from south-west to north-east as far as s an elongated triangle extending between the Alleghanies and the sea, its highest elevation being slight undulation of surface, connecting the Alleghanies with Florida, separates the Atlantic slopa and the Kentucky, descend directly from the Alleghanies towards this river, and yet, their currenbranch which, availing itself of a gap in the Alleghanies, runs direct from Chattanooga to connect of country comprised between the Ohio and the Alleghanies, already without navigable rivers, is alsto force his way into the upper gorges of the Alleghanies. Retracing his steps as soon as he was awar was fought. The parallel ridges of the Alleghanies, which extend from south-west to north-ead country, between two parallel chains of the Alleghanies, extends from the vicinity of the James t[6 more...]
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ay between Washington and the mouth of the river, runs direct to the capital of Virginia, after crossing the Rappahannock at Fredericksburg. The other leaves Alexandria, opposite Washington, and running southwesterly reaches Gordonsville, where it forks. One branch, following the same direction along the foot of the Blue Ridge, connects with the great Tennessee line at Lynchburg by way of Charlottesville; the other branch, bending to the east and running parallel with the tributaries of York River, strikes the first line again near one of these tributaries, and without merging into it, never leaves it until Richmond is reached. Two branches of the Alexandria and Lynchburg line switch off to enter the Valley of Virginia; one at Charlottesville, which debouches at Stanton, near the sources of the Shenandoah, and breaks off a little beyond that point; the other, much more to the north, at about forty-five kilometres from Alexandria, which ascends the valley after crossing the Blue Rid
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
two deep gaps, through which the waters from the mountains force a passage, forming two rivers, both of which empty into the large bay of the Chesapeake; northward, the Potomac waters the gorges of Harper's Ferry, in which we shall see more than one combat take place, and thence runs down to Washington; the James River, winding round the high mountains called Beaver Peaks, crosses Appomattox county, where Lee will capitulate, and after passing Richmond, falls into the Chesapeake, near Fortress Monroe. The Valley of Virginia, already frequently mentioned, an open and wellcultivated country, between two parallel chains of the Alleghanies, extends from the vicinity of the James to the banks of the Potomac. The eastern barrier of this valley, known by the name of the Blue Ridge, is intersected by deep defiles called gaps, situated at about equal distances from each other, and all traversed by good roads. The country extending eastward, between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake, is
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
oga, where it strikes again the railways of the Ohio basin; its length and direction prevent its being an effectual link between the two groups. The other two lines, on the contrary, are intersected by cross-roads forming numerous junctions, the names of which have nearly all figured in the war. Along the line which runs close to the shore, rounding the gulfs and striking the sea from port to port, it is sufficient to mention Richmond, Petersburg, Goldsborough, Wilmington, Charleston, and Savannah, where the track leaves the Atlantic basin to connect with that of the Mexican Gulf at Macon. Along the intermediate line between the mountains and the sea, we find the names of Manassas, Gordonsville, Burkesville, Greensborough, Columbia, Augusta, and finally Atlanta, which is its terminus. At Atlanta, the central point between the three groups, we also find, in another direction, the principal artery of the Gulf basin, together with an important branch which, availing itself of a gap in
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
llow so close that they would reach the banks of Bull Run at the same time. On the 16th, the day fixed for the movement, there was nothing ready to transport the necessary provisions for the army. McDowell was nevertheless obliged to begin his march. He had four divisions with him—the fifth, Runyon's, remaining behind to protect the positions that the army was about to leave. Tyler's division, four brigades strong, was ordered to incline to the right by the Leesburg road, and encamp at Vienna, in order to fall back, by a cross-movement, on Fairfax Court-house the following day; Miles's division was to follow the turnpike as far as Annandale, then to turn to the left into an old road called Braddock Road, because it had been formerly constructed by General Braddock. Hunter followed Miles, Annandale being designated as his first halting-place. Heintzelman, with the strongest division, was directed to proceed by certain cross-roads which, passing south of the line of railway, led
France (France) (search for this): chapter 5
ays were introduced which averted the impending danger. Thanks to them, New Orleans is to-day nearer New York than Marseilles was to Havre forty years ago, when France could count as many inhabitants as constitute the population of the United States at the present time. It is wrong, therefore, to suppose that the extent of theiof the radicals and the workingmen prevented the English government from recognizing the independence of the new Confederacy, notwithstanding the solicitations of France, who, it is said, was even ready to propose to interfere conjointly with Great Britain in American affairs. But the latter power hastened to issue a proclamational as if he had counted on success. No one was better able to render that success possible than himself, in spite of so many disadvantages. Partly educated in France and perfectly acquainted with our literature, he had thoroughly studied the military profession, and, since the Mexican campaign, had shown excellent administrati
Phoenixville (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
of propelling balls and shells. There were wanting field-pieces that could be rapidly constructed at a moderate cost, easily loaded, so as to be handled by inexperienced hands, and projectiles that could be carried to great distances without injury to the parts intended to be forced into the grooves. Two guns were adopted which amply satisfied these requirements—the Parrott gun, made of cast iron, secured with ironplated bands at the breech, and one gun constructed at the ironworks of Phoenixville, designated by its calibre, from three to four and a half inches in diameter, and made of wrought-iron bars. The problem regarding the construction of guns of large calibre was solved by Captain Rodman, whose process imparted such strength to those guns, although made of cast iron, that it only required the application of the Parrott system of plate bands to enable them to discharge conical projectiles of the greatest weight. Up to that time the guns had been cast solid, and bored af
Gallatin, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
fire and forwarded to Richmond, where they were soon put in use. The Confederates set to work without delay to establish such factories as they stood in need of. Nearly all the States erected some at their own expense, which, although at first simply under the general control of the central government, were eventually placed under its exclusive direction. Workshops for the remodelling of old guns and the manufacture of minie rifles were soon established in Memphis, New Orleans, Nashville, Gallatin, and finally at Richmond and in many other south-eastern cities. The Southern States obtained, moreover, supplies of arms and ammunition from Europe. During the first months of the war they were enabled to accomplish this without any great difficulty, notwithstanding the blockade of their coasts which had been ordered by Mr. Lincoln. By degrees this blockade became more effective, but the extent of the Southern coasts, their numerous ports, and the facilities afforded by steam to block
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