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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

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Rolling Fork (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
und him. In fact, these various detachments were trying in vain to approach each other, while avoiding a serious conflict with an enemy superior in numbers to each of them. On the 29th, whilst Harlan's brigade was reaching Elizabethtown, Morgan was approaching Bardstown, and his scouts were already in Fredericksburg. But fearing to be caught between the troops of Baird at Danville and those of Hoskins at Lebanon, he suddenly retraced his steps, passed through Hayesville and encamped at Rolling Fork. On the 31st he crossed the Muldraugh Hills, which lie south of Lebanon, and re-entered the valley of Green River. Baird, at Danville, made no effort to meet him; Woolford, at Greensburg, seemed to have no suspicion of his being so near him at Campbellville. Hoskins alone started in pursuit of him with all his forces. He left Lebanon on the 31st, crossed the Muldraugh Hills on the 1st of January, 1863, and after a forced march reached Green River bridge, which the rear-guard of the en
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
of Tennessee, and the sanguinary battle which closed the year 1862 on the heights of Murfreesborough. Chapter 2: The partisans. SINCE the capture of Fort Donelson, the Federals had occupied the central portion of the State of Tennessee. The Confederates, who had once before made an unsuccessful attempt during the short g much damage, most of the small Federal garrisons, depots and convoys having been placed in safety by Buell, under the protection of the guns of Nashville and Fort Donelson. We left Morgan in Kentucky, where, during the month of September, he shared the fortunes of Kirby Smith's army corps. When Bragg retired to the south-east guns, their tents and provisions. The infantry that had participated in this success belonged to regiments which less than a year previous had capitulated at Fort Donelson, and the hope of effacing this sad remembrance had increased their ardor and doubled their strength. Morgan started off again without losing a moment's time.
Lavergne (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
hat of Negley, attacked Anderson on the 7th of October at Lavergne, and compelled him to retire. Shortly after, Forrest reased at the gorge, Fort Negley, crowning a height near the Lavergne road. They were, however, sufficient to keep Forrest's tsault. Forrest, who was encamped south of the town, near Lavergne, on the Murfreesborough road, had been joined by the Kentnot separated from the main army, along his front, one at Lavergne and the other at Nolensville. We shall leave the army of Murfreesborough. General Kirk dislodged Wheeler from Lavergne; Sheridan and Colonel Roberts drove the Confederates back27th of November, Sill's division thus advanced as far as Lavergne, where it encountered some partisans, with whom it exchanly, so as to allow McCook time to feel the enemy, reached Lavergne on the evening of the 26th, after exchanging a few musket' line of communication with Nashville in the vicinity of Lavergne during the battle. Repulsed by a Federal regiment, the F
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
n Corinth and Meridian; at the south, the line from Vicksburg to Meridian, which passes through Jackson. At the four angles are situated Memphis, Corinth, Meridian and Vicksburg. The rectangle is drun from north-north-east to south-south-west at a short distance front each other. A third, Pearl River, after following a parallel direction as far as Jackson, turns directly south and empties in Jackson, turns directly south and empties in the Gulf of Mexico through Lake Borgne, near New Orleans. Most of this region bears a resemblance to the neighborhood of Corinth; it is a rolling country, covered with forests, interspersed with coneral Sullivan, who commanded the district, committed the error of concentrating all of them at Jackson, where he waited resolutely for Forrest, leaving only convalescents and poorly-armed recruits as informed of Grant's retreat, he had put in motion a portion of his troops from Grenada toward Jackson. The news of the arrival of a Federal army at Milliken's Bend had brought him in great haste t
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
valry, surprised the Confederate pickets at Franklin, took possession of this village, and destroyed all the depots and mills which served to supply Bragg's army. It was evident, however, to the Confederates that Rosecrans was about to undertake operations on a much larger scale. It was important to be prepared either to forestall him by assuming the offensive in advance of him, or, after waiting for him, to take advantage of a first success to hoist the Confederate flag in sight of the capitol of Nashville. Bragg's army received the recruits and materiel needed to repair the losses of the last campaign. It was placed under the chief command of an officer calculated to inspire entire confidence, and before whom Bragg himself bowed in unmurmuring submission, and who might perhaps have brought back victory to the Confederate side if his authority had not been more nominal than real. On the 24th of November, General Joseph E. Johnston, scarcely recovered from the severe wound he h
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Kentucky with the tenth division. On the 30th of October, the day of Rosecrans' installation, the army of the Cumberland was stationed along the line of the Memphis and Louisville Railroad from Glasgow Junction to the famous intersection at Bowling Green. On the 4th of November, McCook took up his line of march with his army corps to relieve the garrison of Nashville, which was then seriously menaced. In fact, Forrest and Morgan, at the head of five or six thousand mounted men, were overrunbeyond this point, at the Mammoth Cave station, formerly frequented by tourists in consequence of the celebrated caves, the principal line inclines to the south-west, whilst a branch of it follows the original direction as far as Glasgow. At Bowling Green, on Big Barren River, we find another branch of the same: the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, which we have followed from the first of these two cities, resumes a southerly direction, and, after forming an angle toward the east leading to
Danville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
es of Craddock and Reed, with two regiments of cavalry, were at Lebanon under Colonel Hoskins. Baird's division, consisting of six regiments of infantry, was at Danville, and Woolford's brigade of cavalry at Greensburg, on Green River, above Munfordsville. Morgan, with his light and compact body of troops, fully relied upon his eaching Elizabethtown, Morgan was approaching Bardstown, and his scouts were already in Fredericksburg. But fearing to be caught between the troops of Baird at Danville and those of Hoskins at Lebanon, he suddenly retraced his steps, passed through Hayesville and encamped at Rolling Fork. On the 31st he crossed the Muldraugh Hills, which lie south of Lebanon, and re-entered the valley of Green River. Baird, at Danville, made no effort to meet him; Woolford, at Greensburg, seemed to have no suspicion of his being so near him at Campbellville. Hoskins alone started in pursuit of him with all his forces. He left Lebanon on the 31st, crossed the Muldraug
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
stment. In the course of this day the flotilla, composed of three armed vessels, the De Kalb, the Cincinnati and the Louisville, with a small number of light boats, had opened a brisk cannonade against the fort, occupying its attention by the desto their cavalry, and had given two or three additional divisions to Bragg, this general would undoubtedly have occupied Louisville, and probably destroyed Buell's army on Green River. The forces of Price and Van Dorn, too numerous to remain on the dr behind, and assumed the more appropriate designation of the army of the Cumberland. The new recruits it had found at Louisville had raised its nominal force to nearly one hundred thousand men, but the long marches through a country destitute of wad himself in close proximity to the principal line of the Kentucky railways. This line leaves the banks of the Ohio at Louisville; running directly south, it reaches the village of Elizabethtown, after passing through a tunnel of considerable length
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
direction as far as Glasgow. At Bowling Green, on Big Barren River, we find another branch of the same: the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, which we have followed from the first of these two cities, resumes a southerly direction, and, after forming an angle toward the east leading to the village of Gallatin, it reaches the capital of Tennessee, on the banks of the Cumberland. The other line is the Memphis and Ohio Railroad, which, extending to the south-west, reaches the banks of the Tennessee by way of Russellville, Clarksville and Dover. The Federal general Gilbert was charged to protect these railway tracks. It was a difficult task in presence of such a foe as Morgan, who was at the head of more than three thousand mounted combatants. Gilbert had under his command, more or less directly, his old division, the Tenth, and a large number of depots, detachments and incomplete corps, which occupied a considerable extent of ground, but were imperfectly connected; these forces, c
Versailles (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
, and repulsed the attacks of a small body of Federal troops which had imprudently advanced in that direction. The next day, another detachment of about three hundred mounted men having also ventured within his reach, Morgan surprised it, captured the entire force, and did not hesitate to suddenly enter the town of Lexington itself. After remaining in possession of the place for a few hours, instead of retiring eastward or southward, he took the direct route to the west, and marched upon Versailles. At this point he divided his force in order the more easily to avoid the Federals. A portion of his cavalry proceeded south-eastward by way of Richmond and Mount Vernon. On the 23d of October, the day when Bragg was passing from Kentucky into Tennessee, these troops were attacked by Colonel McCook at the pass of Big Hill, and left a considerable number of prisoners in the hands of the Federals. On the following day, the 24th, we find another detachment at the other end of the State fo
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