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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

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Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
er command of McClernand numbered from twenty-six to twenty-seven thousand men, comprising forty regiments of infantry, ten batteries, many of which contained twenty pounders, and about fifteen hundred horse. Instead of entering the Arkansas at Napoleon, the fleet, in order to deceive the enemy as to its destination, penetrated into White River through a branch of the latter which empties directly into the Mississippi a little below, and thence reaches the Arkansas through the principal arm, whituated at Duval's Bluff, and several depots belonging to the Confederate army in the small town of Des Arcs. In the mean while, McClernand dismantled the works of Fort Hindman, after which he re-entered the Mississippi with all his forces. At Napoleon he found an order from General Grant directing him to return to Milliken's Bend; this point was about to become the base of operations which the general-in-chief was preparing to undertake against Vicksburg. In coming pages we shall relate th
Bear Wallow, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
le. Morgan, with his light and compact body of troops, fully relied upon his ability to pass through all these separate detachments and effect his escape before they had time to contrive any plan for crushing him. The news of his arrival at Glasgow was brought to Munfordsville by a small body of mounted troops, the Second Michigan, which had followed in his tracks from Gallatin. Hobson immediately sent his three regiments of cavalry to watch him. They fell in with him on the 25th at Bear Wallow and Green's Chapel, but were unable to prevent his taking possession of the railway track, which he destroyed immediately. Morgan, making a feint against Munfordsville, which he considered impregnable, described a circuit around that place, and struck the railroad again more to northward, at Bacon Creek bridge. He captured the palisaded camp, with all the troops which defended this bridge; and being now certain of having the start of any force that might be sent from the south in pursui
Grand Junction (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
at the north, from Memphis to Corinth by way of Grand Junction; at the east, the section of the Mobile and Ohiad, which runs parallel to the Mississippi from Grand Junction to Jackson. Between the two extremities of thitwo came from Corinth, and all proceeded toward Grand Junction. On the 4th the Federal army occupied this poi cross the Mississippi Central Railroad between Grand Junction and Grenada. Pemberton had fortified the banksolly Springs, the first important station after Grand Junction. The Federal cavalry, both numerous and activetion of the two railroads from Memphis and from Grand Junction to Grenada. After destroying the track as wells rear-guards as far as Oxford, halfway between Grand Junction and Grenada; but being obliged to repair the ralves only one hundred and sixty kilometres from Grand Junction, and about five hundred kilometres from Columbua few days later, it again entered Lagrange and Grand Junction, where it found itself once more in communicati
Morgantown, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e in order the more easily to avoid the Federals. A portion of his cavalry proceeded south-eastward by way of Richmond and Mount Vernon. On the 23d of October, the day when Bragg was passing from Kentucky into Tennessee, these troops were attacked by Colonel McCook at the pass of Big Hill, and left a considerable number of prisoners in the hands of the Federals. On the following day, the 24th, we find another detachment at the other end of the State forcing the passage of Green River at Morgantown after a brief engagement. For fifteen days Morgan disappeared from the scene of action. He had been assembling his men in the valley of the Cumberland, and had rallied around him the numerous partisans who were masters of that region since the 1st of October, when they had routed a Federal detachment commanded by Colonel Stokes at Gallatin, Tennessee. He was not, however, to remain long inactive. The Confederates, responding to the appeal of the population of Nashville, which was ard
Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Cheatham, formed the left wing, which was stationed at Eagleville, about thirty-two kilometres west-south-west of Murfreesborough, on the road from Nashville to Shelbyville; the right wing was placed at Readsville, twenty kilometres east of that point, and consisted of Mc-Cown's division, detached from Smith's corps. These two win road, the only practicable one for an army, then the bad and narrow road which at the hamlet of Wilkinson's Cross-roads branches off from that of Nashville and Shelbyville, which has already been alluded to, and, farther yet, the Franklin and Murfreesborough road, which runs directly from the west, crossing Overall's Creek near itennessee must not be confounded with Duck River in the State of Kentucky, to which allusion has been made in another place. which it occupied from Manchester to Shelbyville, the Tullahoma Junction becoming the central depot of its supplies and the headquarters of the general-in-chief. Rosecrans did not proceed beyond Murfreesbor
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ded by General Churchill. This work, called Fort Hindman, was the key to the whole course of the Arkansas. Its reduction was necessary before the occupancy of Little Rock and the centre of the State could be thought of. It was the shelter of the light vessels which the Confederates sent, when the opportunity offered, as far as th and Hindman's army paralyzed by a blow which cost him the loss of an entire division, composed of three of his best brigades. Sherman wished to push as far as Little Rock, but McClernand was not willing to exceed the instructions he had received, and merely sent an expedition composed of light steamers with Gorman's brigade on boion of the army of Arkansas, which unfortunately was not under his command, should be sent to the relief of Pemberton. Mr. Davis thought otherwise. Holmes, at Little Rock, received, instead of formal instructions, a simple recommendation to detach a part of his forces eastward, and the President, interfering in person, took from
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
sted soldiers before Columbia, he quietly proceeded through Jamestown to join the left flank of Bragg's army in the positions which the latter had just taken on Duck River, as will be seen presently. This new expedition was thus accomplished without the least opposition; but it could not have been productive of great results, unlhat the Confederate cavalry surrendered the town of Murfreesborough to the Federals. Bragg's army halted on the same day behind the line of Duck River, This Duck River in the State of Tennessee must not be confounded with Duck River in the State of Kentucky, to which allusion has been made in another place. which it occupied fDuck River in the State of Kentucky, to which allusion has been made in another place. which it occupied from Manchester to Shelbyville, the Tullahoma Junction becoming the central depot of its supplies and the headquarters of the general-in-chief. Rosecrans did not proceed beyond Murfreesborough, and his army, having taken up its quarters in the neighborhood of this town, soon found itself in communication with Nashville by means
Coffeeville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
unction of the two railroads from Memphis and from Grand Junction to Grenada. After destroying the track as well as they could, they proceeded upward as far as Coffeeville, on the Mississippi Central Railroad, returning to Delta about the 30th of November. They had not irreparably damaged the lines of railway, but they had threaty were not able greatly to harass his march. However, while their infantry occupied Oxford on the 5th of December, their cavalry was already in the vicinity of Coffeeville, thirty kilometres from Grenada; the largest portion of Pemberton's army was massed in this position, behind the Yallabusha, its front being covered by Lovell with two divisions in advance of this river. That very day the approaches to Coffeeville were the scene of a brisk encounter between these troops and the division of Federal cavalry, which was pressing them too closely. The cavalry was driven back upon its infantry reserves, but retired in good order, showing a resistance which el
Priddy (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ft at Helena, in Arkansas, on the borders of the Mississippi, in the middle of July, also emerged from its inaction under the direction of Steele, its new commander. About seven thousand men, nearly all cavalry, were transported to Delta, on the other bank of the river, and Generals Washburn and Hovey, who were in command, were ordered to destroy the railway track in the rear of Pemberton, through which he obtained his supplies. They took the field on the 20th of November. Crossing Cold Water River, one of the natural canals which run into the Tallahatchie from the Mississippi, they captured a Confederate camp, and by a forced march reached, at Granger, the point of junction of the two railroads from Memphis and from Grand Junction to Grenada. After destroying the track as well as they could, they proceeded upward as far as Coffeeville, on the Mississippi Central Railroad, returning to Delta about the 30th of November. They had not irreparably damaged the lines of railway, but t
Trenton, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ough to capture the principal fortified posts of the Federals if the small garrisons occupying them knew how to defend themselves behind their parapets and palisades. But General Sullivan, who commanded the district, committed the error of concentrating all of them at Jackson, where he waited resolutely for Forrest, leaving only convalescents and poorly-armed recruits at the other posts. Forrest took good care to avoid him, and presented himself on the 20th of December before Humboldt and Trenton, the defenders of which, being invalids and men without experience, did not make a long stand against his artillery and skilful skirmishers. He was thus able to destroy at leisure the important branch of railway from Humboldt to Columbus, through which Grant received his supplies. For some days he was master of the whole country, and conscientiously fulfilled his task. At last Sullivan collected a sufficient number of troops to resume the offensive, and started in pursuit of him with on
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