hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
McClellan 645 73 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 470 0 Browse Search
Pope 308 14 Browse Search
Longstreet 283 1 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 281 3 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 275 1 Browse Search
Burnside 269 3 Browse Search
Rosecrans 228 2 Browse Search
Fitzjohn Porter 227 1 Browse Search
Hooker 216 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

Found 2,014 total hits in 464 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Cape Fear (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
d been considerably shortened at the end of 1861 by the completion of the Danville and Greensboroa section, which avoided the circuitous route of Raleigh. The other runs southward, in an almost direct line from Richmond to Wilmington, along Cape Fear River, thence proceeding westward toward South Carolina. This line crosses the Roanoke at Weldon, and the Neuse at Goldsboroa. If Burnside had been able to strike the railroad near one of these two points, he would have caused serious trouble toof little importance, to mention, which was made from the 12th to the 14th of August, by the small steamer Treaty, on the Black River, a water-course which empties into the bay of Georgetown between that of Charleston and the entrance of the Cape Fear River. The Treaty proceeded up the Black River for a distance of forty kilometres in the hope of seizing a vessel of the enemy which was lying there; but having learnt that this vessel was abandoned, she again came down the river after dispersing
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
takes its rise, runs along the boundary-line of the States of Virginia and North Carolina, and on the borders of which are successively to be met the villages of Weldon, Hamilton, Williamston and Plymouth. Albemarle Sound extends northward, between the mainland and the sand-bank by which it is bounded, almost as far as Cape Henr, in an almost direct line from Richmond to Wilmington, along Cape Fear River, thence proceeding westward toward South Carolina. This line crosses the Roanoke at Weldon, and the Neuse at Goldsboroa. If Burnside had been able to strike the railroad near one of these two points, he would have caused serious trouble to the Confeder not possess any ship of a really formidable character in the Roanoke; secondly, that this river was not sufficiently deep to enable gun-boats to ascend as far as Weldon. In the beginning of August, Foster, having received the reinforcements he had been expecting, transferred his headquarters from Moorehead City to Newberne, a
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
lets and Lake Pontchartrain, thus forming a continuous barrier which effectually protected New Orleans. It is extended beyond Lake Pontchartrain by Lake Maurepas, and still further west by the swamps adjoining Amitie River. This river, proceeding from the vicinity of Baton Rouge, discharges its waters into the first of the lakes above mentioned, which, in turn, empties into the second, at the east, through a channel called Manchac pass. The great line of railway which traverses the State of Mississippi throughout its entire length, reaching down to New Orleans from Memphis through Jackson, penetrates into the peninsula by crossing the Manchac pass over an important bridge. It was probable, therefore, that as soon as the railroad had brought the Confederates sufficient forces to enable them to strike a blow against New Orleans, they would debouch from this direction. The Southern general J. Thompson had stationed himself in the village of Pontchitoula, situated seventy-seven kilom
Cape Lookout (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
eake Bay, under the name of Currituck Sound; but this arm of the sea does not communicate with the ocean, which can only be reached through Pamlico and the Strait of Croatan. The strip of land bordering on Pamlico Sound, as we have stated elsewhere, presents but four navigable passage-ways for vessels— New Inlet, Hatteras Inlet, where the forts were situated, Ocracoke Inlet, and lastly Old Topsail Inlet. This last inlet, situated near an angle formed by the sand-bank known to sailors as Cape Lookout, only communicates with the inland sea through a kind of narrow lagoon, which stretches southward, as Currituck Sound extends northward. It was nevertheless the inlet most frequented by trading-vessels before the war. It was protected by Fort Macon, which the Federals had captured in April. At a short distance from this fort, but on the mainland, stood, on the two sides of a small bay, the towns of Beaufort and Moore-head City. A railroad connects the latter with the town of Goldsboro
Tar River (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ard by means of two deep estuaries, which are in their turn cut up into numberless small creeks. At the north, that of Tar River takes, from the village of Washington, the name of Pamlico River; at the south that of Neuse River retains the name of nd sea by attacking at the same time Plymouth, on the right border of the Roanoke, and Washington, on the left bank of the Tar. With regard to the town of Newberne, which is the key of the Neuse, it was too well defended for them to entertain any hoore advantageous to his troops than an idle camp-life around Newberne. He resolved to scour the country watered by the Tar River with his division, and to come up, if possible, with the forces of the enemy, supposed to consist of three regiments whvance as far as the Richmond and Wilmington Railroad, and destroy the bridge over which this important line crosses the Tar River. One brigade proceeded by land to Washington, the other two being conveyed there by water; and on the 3d of November
Williamston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
s along the boundary-line of the States of Virginia and North Carolina, and on the borders of which are successively to be met the villages of Weldon, Hamilton, Williamston and Plymouth. Albemarle Sound extends northward, between the mainland and the sand-bank by which it is bounded, almost as far as Cape Henry, in Virginia, at th proceeded by land to Washington, the other two being conveyed there by water; and on the 3d of November the expedition, numbering six thousand men, started for Williamston, on the Roanoke, across the interminable pine-forests which abound in that region. Its march was delayed by the mud, into which both horses and vehicles sank at of about seven hundred Confederates sought to stop it. But the latter were dislodged from their position after a brief skirmish, and on the 4th Foster reached Williamston, where Captain Davenport, who had come up the Roanoke with five gun-boats, had preceded him. The Confederates were at this moment preparing for a new attack upo
Tuscarora (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
panish waters of Algeciras, could give her chase as soon as she should venture to come out. It is a well-known rule of international law that, when two hostile vessels meet in the waters of a neutral power, the first to leave the port is to be granted a start of twenty-four hours. The recognition of the Confederates as belligerents gave to their privateers the benefit of this law, but it was naturally not applicable between Algeciras and Gibraltar. The rapid speed and powerful guns of the Tuscarora made her a formidable adversary. The Sumter had no chance to escape her except by making for the open sea, and taking such measures as to render it unnecessary for her to stop at a neighboring port. But in order to do this she required a larger supply of coal than was authorized by international law, and the vigilance of the American consul did not allow Semmes to evade the law. Finally, in the month of April, despairing of his ability to reach the open sea with that vessel, and expectin
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ong Cape Fear River, thence proceeding westward toward South Carolina. This line crosses the Roanoke at Weldon, and the Neu on her model, and join Dupont's fleet on the coast of South Carolina. It was hoped that she would be able to force the pashe floor, soon retired. The States of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, F Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and South Carolina. The representatives of Texas were admitted to seats ortion of the rich plantations with which the coast of South Carolina is covered into the hands of the Federal authority. Jments to them. The agents of the government sent into South Carolina were but little acquainted with the country, and still abolished in the three States of Georgia, Florida and South Carolina. The abolition party loudly applauded this proclamatid at the head of the regiment. We have said that in South Carolina the agents of the Treasury Department in charge of the
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
lway lines of North Carolina. This was the junction of railway lines that Burnside was charged to break up after the capture of Newberne—an operation which might have had a great bearing upon the whole system of Confederate defences, but which he was obliged to forego in consequence of the reverse sustained by the Federal troops before Richmond. In fact, Virginia was only connected with the other Southern States by three lines of railway. To the west there was the Richmond, Lynchburg, Knoxville and Chattanooga line, which the Federals menaced every time they advanced either from Nashville or Kentucky toward East Tennessee. The other two lines placed Virginia in communication with the other States bordering the Atlantic, the two Carolinas and Georgia, whence Lee's army derived part of its supplies. These two lines, composed of several branches constructed at different periods, described many zigzags through the country which they traversed. One, in the vicinity of the mountains
Calcasieu Lake (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
h the title of acting master. He resolved to finish the work he had so successfully begun, by going in search of and destroying all the vessels engaged as blockade-runners in the bays situated between Sabine Pass and the entrance of the Atchafalaya. While the crews of the schooners were landing on the west side of Lake Sabine and setting fire to a railroad bridge over a stream called Taylor's Bayou, he proceeded on board the Kensington to visit the passes through which the waters of Lakes Calcasieu and Mermantau empty into the sea, and captured several vessels, among others a small steamer. Meanwhile, the Confederates promptly repaired the little damage done to the bridge of Taylor's Bayou by the fire; and understanding how important it was for them to retain possession of this bridge, so as to be able at all times to menace Sabine City, they stationed there a garrison of three hundred men. On the 15th of October, Crocker, with a steamer recently captured, on board of which he had p
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...