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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739.. Search the whole document.

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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
side the pulpit, and the Governor Governor Christopher Gore, Governor or Massachusetts in 1809. and family the one on the other side. The Governor's three-corner the name of Eden Vale, and attracted the attention of the publisher of the Massachusetts Magazine, the number of which for April, 1793, contained an engraving of th answered in the affirmative. How quickly the minute-men of the towns of Massachusetts responded to the call of their Committee of Safety, issued the day after thhed each of the following named persons, who had enlisted in the service of Massachusetts for the defence of the liberties of America, with a good blanket:— Eliphm we should in 13 miles have saved at least 6. In 1786 there occurred in Massachusetts an insurrection against the government known as Shays's Rebellion; it cause. To the town of Waltham belongs the credit of being one of the first in Massachusetts to establish a Union League, which should embrace not only legal voters, bu
Hardys Pond (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ns's wood lot, where partridges, woodcocks, quails, rabbits, and particularly gray squirrels, were formerly very plentiful. Wellington's Grove, the scene of many a Fourth of July celebration, and the old Great Pond, with its quartette of modern names, It is to be hoped that its ancient name of Saltonstall may be restored to this beautiful sheet of water, and forever remain a memorial of the leader of the founders of the old plantation on Charles River. See p. 27. n. 1, where the name Hardy's Pond is omitted. are well known features of Trapelo's west end. Mount Enoch, also on Wellington lands, is the highest of the Trapelo Hills, and offers fine views from its summit to the north and west. During the first seventy-five years after the incorporation of the town, the men of Trapelo filled important positions of trust and honor in the management of town affairs. The Browns, through Deacon William Brown and three generations of descendants, were represented nearly every year. Th
Chelmsford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
towns.—Bond. who sold to Jonas Dix, Jonas Dix was a graduate of Harvard in 1769; was Selectman in 1780-86 and School-master for twenty-two winters. who in turn sold to Theodore Lyman. In the hands of the latter the rough and irregular grounds were brought into the highest state of cultivation, and laid out in the most artistic and elegant manner. Across the brook which flowed through the lawn in front of the house he erected a beautifully proportioned bridge of three arches, made of Chelmsford white stone, which added greatly to the beauty of the place: but owing to some trouble with the town concerning it, it was afterwards removed. Sixty years ago there was a deer park on the south side of Beaver Street opposite Forest Street, and from the bridge a road extended through the grounds across the present Linden Street to the back road, in the direction of Quince Street. Our views convey but a faint idea of the picturesqueness of the scenery in these attractive grounds. On the
Sea Island (Canada) (search for this): chapter 3
1812 Mr. Bemis had to transport his manufactured goods by his own teams overland to Baltimore, Alexandria, and even Richmond. His teams would be gone on these expeditions several months, bringing back, as return freight, flour, tobacco, and other articles of southern products. One house in Baltimore made sales for him in 1812-13 of about $20,000, and another in 1815-16 of more than $21,000. The brick building in which the English weavers worked is still standing. His duck was made of Sea Island cotton, which then cost 20 to 25 cents per pound, while the No. 1 duck during the war sold at nearly $1 per yard. He introduced the power loom in 1816, His looms were set up by a Mr. Stimson, machinist, of Cambridgeport. and by this means reduced the cost of weaving from fourteen cents to nine-tenths of one cent per yard. In 1831 the price of duck was 35 cents per yard. Mr. Bemis discontinued the manufacture of duck in 1816, resumed it in 1830 and continued it till 1836 when he relin
Needham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
a portion of them from Nicolas Cady by a deed dated September 11, 1668, which is still preserved. Further west, the Lawrences own part of the farm once belonging to Hopestill Mead, who was a Selectman in 1745 and 1746. Here, extending on Trapelo Street about three-eighths of a mile, rises Mackerel Hill, from the sides and summit of which to the south and east fine views may be had of Newton and Brighton, Boston and Roxbury, with the Blue Hills of Milton in the distance, and portions of Needham, Dedham, Natick, Weston, and other towns. On its western slope is a dense pine grove, through which the sun but faintly penetrates, whose soft carpet invites repose, and through whose swaying branches the gentle winds chant a melody beautiful as the song of the Messenger Bird. Near Forest Street was the residence of Deacon William Brown, who was one of the petitioners for the incorporation of the town, called the first town-meeting, and held numerous positions of trust, before and afte
West Newton (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
war sold at nearly $1 per yard. He introduced the power loom in 1816, His looms were set up by a Mr. Stimson, machinist, of Cambridgeport. and by this means reduced the cost of weaving from fourteen cents to nine-tenths of one cent per yard. In 1831 the price of duck was 35 cents per yard. Mr. Bemis discontinued the manufacture of duck in 1816, resumed it in 1830 and continued it till 1836 when he relinquished it altogether. In the autumn of 1812 the venerable Seth Davis, now of West Newton, erected for Mr. Bemis a small brick building at the east end of the old mill for a gas-house, and for two years the factory was lighted with gas made from coal. This is believed to have been the first successful attempt to use gas in the United States. In 1798 a part of the celebrated manufactory of Boulton and Watt, at Soho, England, was lighted with gas, and in 1805 the cotton mills of Messrs. Phillips and Lea, at Salford, were lighted by Mr. William Murdock, of Redmuth in Cornwall,
Braintree (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Flax on demand. Daniel Shays. In the Constitutional Convention of 1788 the votes of a majority of the Delegates from Middlesex County were given against the adoption of the Federal Constitution; seventeen Delegates voting in favor of the adoption and twenty-five against. The Delegates from Waltham and Weston voted in the affirmative; those from Watertown in the negative. April 13, 1789, John Adams, Vice-President elect of the United States, set out on his journey to New York from Braintree, via Dorchester, Charlestown, and Cambridge. At Watertown Major Kent's Artillery saluted his Excellency, who passed on through Waltham, and arrived in New York at noon on the 20th. In October of the same year Washington visited the Eastern States, leaving New York on Thursday the 15th. He lodged and breakfasted at Captain Flagg's in Weston. Captain Fuller's company of Horse met him and escorted him through Waltham and Watertown to Cambridge. He, too, was saluted by the Watertown Art
Northfield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
was 147. Quick-stock, viz.: 3 slaves, 299 sheep, 188 swine, 111 horses, 455 cows, 118 oxen, 9 chairs, and 1 chaise. The chair being a sort of open chaise. February 1, 1730 Rev. Warham Williams baptized Peter, an infant negro belonging to Joseph and Margaret Priest. In 1790, there were 10 colored persons in the town; 6 in 1800, 5 in 1810. In 1753 one Prince Jonah, a slave of Abraham Bigelow of Weston, found a leather pocket case with tickets of land lying in Gardner, Canada, east of Northfield, belonging to Joe Williams, also one dollar, one pistareen, and two coppers, and an empty money bag. This was so extraordinary an occurrence that it was entered upon the town records, and there stands a witness to the sterling honesty and integrity of the fathers. February 3, 1752, before the settlement of Mr. Cushing, the church and town invited Mr. Eli Forbush to become pastor. March 16th he declined the call, but asked further time to consider it. March 27th he wrote stating that he
Soho (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
f duck in 1816, resumed it in 1830 and continued it till 1836 when he relinquished it altogether. In the autumn of 1812 the venerable Seth Davis, now of West Newton, erected for Mr. Bemis a small brick building at the east end of the old mill for a gas-house, and for two years the factory was lighted with gas made from coal. This is believed to have been the first successful attempt to use gas in the United States. In 1798 a part of the celebrated manufactory of Boulton and Watt, at Soho, England, was lighted with gas, and in 1805 the cotton mills of Messrs. Phillips and Lea, at Salford, were lighted by Mr. William Murdock, of Redmuth in Cornwall, who in 1792 had lighted his own house and offices successfully; this is the earliest recorded use of gas for the purpose of lighting. The use of gas by Mr. Bemis was discontinued after two years, only because the tin pipes through which it was conducted leaked so badly, and it was prepared so close to his dwelling-house, that its lo
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
, the birthplace or home of the Rev. John Eliot, and other early settlers of New England. It is a large, irregular town, situated near the Lea, which is here separatThis description of the Pond and Fall, Josselyn himself borrowed from Wood's New England's Prospect, 1634. A mile and a half from the Town is a great Fall of Fresh W supplies and manufactures sent in from the northern and western sections of New England to Boston. Large droves of cattle stopped here on their way to Monday's marnd departing the harbor of Boston. On the west, the many mountain-ranges of New England rise up before us,— mountain on mountain, until summit and cloud are united. south, in the river-valley, clusters the line of picturesque and prosperous New England villages that fill the plateau of the river to the sea. In what part of the that creeps out upon the plain is marked upon this busy and beautiful map of New England life by an unbroken succession of the habitations of men and the houses of G
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