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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ing to submit to the culture of civilization. Massachusetts and Carolina were both colonized under proprietaulation in lands. The government established in Massachusetts was essentially popular, and was the growth of tnstitution of Carolina was invented in England. Massachusetts was originally colonized by a feeble band of sufobsequious judiciary, annulled the government of Massachusetts; the colonists repudiated the constitutions of C deserted; and if its sufferings became extreme, Massachusetts, the young mother of colonies, not indifferent tcontri- 1667. ution through her settlements. Massachusetts Records for May, 1667, vol. IV. part II. p. 337the roving restlessness of the Independents from Massachusetts produced the distractions which ensued; nature hssible; yet at any rate to get settlers. Like Massachusetts, Virginia was the mother of a Chap XIII.} clusty, having barely escaped with life?—the towns of Massachusetts contributed liberally to their support, and prov
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
outh, and more than forty degrees from east to west; comprising all the territory of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, much of Florida and Missouri, nearly all of Texas, and a large portion of Mexico. The soil, and, under the limitation of a nominal allegiance, the sovereignty also, were theirs, with the power of legislation, subject to the consent of the future freemen of the colony. The grant of privileges was ample, like those to Rhode Island and Connecticut. An express clause in the charter for Carolina opened the way for religious freedom; another held out to the proprietaries a hope of revenue from colonial customs, to be imposed in colonial ports by Carolina legislatures; another gave them the power of erecting cities and manors, counties and baronies, and of establishing orders of nobility, with other than English titles. It was evident that the founding of an empire was contemplated; for the power to levy troops, to er
New Market (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
's day, gathering from their plantations upon the banks of the Cooper, and taking advantage of the ebb and flow of the tide, they might all regularly be seen, the parents with their children, whom no bigot could now wrest from them, making their way in light skiffs, through scenes so tranquil, that silence was broken only by the rippling of oars, and the hum of the flourishing village at the confluence of the rivers. Other Huguenot emigrants established themselves on the south bank of the Santee, in a region which has since been celebrated for affluence and refined hospitality. The United States are full of monuments of the emigrations from France. When the struggle for independence arrived, the son of Judith Manigault intrusted the vast fortune he had acquired to the service of the country that had adopted his mother; the hall in Boston, where the eloquence of New England rocked the infant spirit of independence, was the gift of the son of a Huguenot; when the treaty of Paris f
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
St. Augustine, the covetous Clarendon and his associates easily 1665 June 13. obtained from the king a new charter, which granted to them, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, all the land lying between twenty-nine degrees and Chap. XIII.} 1665. thirty-six degrees thirty minutes, north latitude; a territory extending seven and a half degrees from north to south, and more than forty degrees from east to west; comprising all the territory of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, much of Florida and Missouri, nearly all of Texas, and a large portion of Mexico. The soil, and, under the limitation of a nominal allegiance, the sovereignty also, were theirs, with the power of legislation, subject to the consent of the future freemen of the colony. The grant of privileges was ample, like those to Rhode Island and Connecticut. An express clause in the charter for Carolina opened the way for religious freedom; another held out to the p
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ays Barbadoes; and not inadvertently. Dalcho, Hist. of Prot. Ep. Church in S. C., p. 9, shows that Sayle was at Bermuda. Dalcho is very useful for the early history of S. C., and is more scrupulous than Ramsay. the ships Chap XIII.} 1670 which bore the company entered the well-known waters where the fleet of Ribault had anchored, and examined the site where the Huguenots had engraved the lilies of France, and erected the fortress of Carolina. Ramsay, i. 34 and 2. But the vicinity of Beaufort was not destined to harbor the first colony of the English; the emigrants, after short delay, Ramsay says, i. 2, in 1671. He is in error. See Dalcho, 9. See, also, Dalcho, p. 10, where it appears hat, May 1, 1671, it was known in England that the colony had planted in Ashley River. There is no evidence that the ships did more than sail into the harbor of Port Royal, and, after a survey, sail out again. Chalmers, 530, favors the error into which Ramsay subsequently fell. Wilson, in
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
C. been written, that the name, the merits, and the end of its first governor were not known. Drummond, an emigrant to Virginia Hening, i. 549, II. 158. from Scotland, Sir Wm. Berkeley's List, &c., copied by Greenhow, published by P. Force, 1835. Drummond, a Scotchman. probably a Presbyterian, a Chap. XIII.} Man of prudenc fertility of the south, and were received with so hearty a welcome, that they were soon merged among the other colonists. Chalmers, 543. The condition of Scotland, also, compelled its inhabitants to seek peace by abandoning their native country. Just after the death of Shaftesbury, a 1683 scheme, which had been concertedich they claimed as a dependency of St. Augustine, invaded the frontier settlement, and laid it entirely 1686. waste. Of the unhappy emigrants, some returned to Scotland; some mingled with the earlier planters of Carolina. Archdale, 14. Hewat, i. 89. Chalmers, 547, 548. Ramsay l. 127. Laing, IV. 187 More than a hundred
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
at, May 1, 1671, it was known in England that the colony had planted in Ashley River. There is no evidence that the ships did more than sail into the harbor of Port Royal, and, after a survey, sail out again. Chalmers, 530, favors the error into which Ramsay subsequently fell. Wilson, in his Carolina, p. 7, says nothing of PortPort Royal. Ashley River first settled in 1670. sailed into Ashley River, and on the first high land, in a spot that seemed convenient for tillage and pasturing, the three Wilson's Carolina, 7. shiploads of emigrants, who as yet formed the whole people of South Carolina, selected their resting-place, and began their first town. OfLauderdale, Laing IV. 72. set sail for Chap. XIII.} 1684. Carolina. But even there the ten families of outcasts found no peace. They planted themselves at Port Royal; Ramsay says, in 1682. the colony of Ashley River claimed over them a jurisdiction which was reluctantly conceded. Cardross returned to Europe, to render se
Cape Carteret (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
from climate and soil, was celebrated in advance as the beauty and envy of North America. Talbot, in dedication of Lederer. They were conducted by Joseph West, as commercial agent for the proprietaries, and by William Sayle, who was probably a Presbyterian, and having more than twenty years before made himself known as leader in an attempt to plant an Eleutheria in the isles of the Gulf of Florida, was now constituted a proprietary governor, with jurisdiction extending as far north as Cape Carteret, as far south as the Spaniards would tolerate. Having touched at Ireland and Barbadoes, Chalmers, 529, says Barbadoes; and not inadvertently. Dalcho, Hist. of Prot. Ep. Church in S. C., p. 9, shows that Sayle was at Bermuda. Dalcho is very useful for the early history of S. C., and is more scrupulous than Ramsay. the ships Chap XIII.} 1670 which bore the company entered the well-known waters where the fleet of Ribault had anchored, and examined the site where the Huguenots had
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
rities. The accounts in the historians of North Carolina are confused. As far as I can learn, no m. communicated by D. L. Swain, governor of North Carolina, in 1835. and, in the Chap XIII.} 1663 Apuch was the origin of fixed settlements in North Carolina. The child of ecclesiastical oppression wrecord of the legislative history of 1669 North Carolina, begins with the autumn of 1669, Chalmearies, were reenacted in and were valid in North Carolina for more than half a century. Martin, ier's edge; and, as the chief magistrate of North Carolina and the envoy of humanity travelled togethin the relations of English legislation to North Carolina. The whole state hardly contained four th-government, let them study the history of North Carolina; its inhabitants were restless and turbuleand, vol. i. p. 135, calls the fathers of North Carolina a set of rioters and robbers. Shaftesbury was becoming familiar? But the people of North Carolina, already experienced in rebellion, having [9 more...]
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
inst the wishes of Locke, a clause was interpolated, declaring that while every religion should be tolerated, the Church of England, as the only true and orthodox church, was to be the national religion of Carolina, and was alone to receive public maintenance by grants from the colonial parliament. This revised copy was not signed till March, 1670. To a colony of which the majority were likely to be dissenters, the change was vital; This discovery is due to William James Rivers of Charleston, S. C. it was scarcely noticed in England, where the model became the theme of extravagant applause. It is without compare, wrote Blome, in 1672. Empires, added an admirer of Shaftesbury, will be ambitious of subjection to the noble government which deep wisdom has projected for Carolina; W. Talbot's Dedication of Lederer's Discoveries. So, too, Wilson, in the Dedication, in 1682, to his tract on Carolina. and the propri- Chap. XIII.} etaries believed they had set their seals to a sacr
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