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Huguenot (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
roves. Their church was in Charleston; and thither, on every Lord's day, gathering from their plantations upon the banks of the Cooper, and taking advantage of the ebb and flow of the tide, they might all regularly be seen, the parents with their children, whom no bigot could now wrest from them, making their way in light skiffs, through scenes so tranquil, that silence was broken only by the rippling of oars, and the hum of the flourishing village at the confluence of the rivers. Other Huguenot emigrants established themselves on the south bank of the Santee, in a region which has since been celebrated for affluence and refined hospitality. The United States are full of monuments of the emigrations from France. When the struggle for independence arrived, the son of Judith Manigault intrusted the vast fortune he had acquired to the service of the country that had adopted his mother; the hall in Boston, where the eloquence of New England rocked the infant spirit of independence,
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 3
Santee, in a region which has since been celebrated for affluence and refined hospitality. The United States are full of monuments of the emigrations from France. When the struggle for independence arrived, the son of Judith Manigault intrusted the vast fortune he had acquired to the service of the country that had adopted his mother; the hall in Boston, where the eloquence of New England rocked the infant spirit of independence, was the gift of the son of a Huguenot; when the treaty of Paris for the independence of our country was framing, the grandson of a Huguenot, acquainted from childhood with the wrongs of his ancestors, would not allow his jealousies of France to be lulled, and exerted a powerful influence in stretching the boundary of the states to the Mississippi. On our north-eastern frontier state. the name of the oldest college bears witness to the Chap XIII.} wise liberality of a descendant of the Huguenots. The children of the Calvinists of France have reason t
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Posthumous Pieces of Mr. John Locke. But the formation of political institutions in the United States was not effected by giant minds, or nobles after the flesh. American history knows but one property The two Charters, &c. p. 54,—a small 4to., printed without date. attempt within the United States to connect political power with hereditary wealth. America was singularly rich in every forts long prevailed; and the class of white laborers was always numerous; for no where in the United States is the climate more favor- Chap. XIII.} able to the Anglo-Saxon laborer than in Virginia. e Coligny, with the sanction of the French monarch, had selected the southern regions of the United States as the residence of Huguenots. The realization of that design, in defiance of the Bourbons,e, in a region which has since been celebrated for affluence and refined hospitality. The United States are full of monuments of the emigrations from France. When the struggle for independence ar
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
which had been retained in the days of Charles I. and of Cromwell, and which was renewed under Charles II., Compare Carolina, by T. A 1682, p. 3. continued to be encouraged by similar giants. Clayborne, Hening, i. 377. the early trader in Maryland, 1652 still cherished a fondness for discovery; and the sons of Governor Yeardley Thurloe, II. 273, 274. Letter of Francis Yeardley to John Farrar. wrote to England with exultation, that the northern country of Carolina had been explored by Dalcho, 13. Hewat, i. 53 Thus the institution of negro slavery is coeval with the first plantations on Ashley River. Of the original thirteen states, South Carolina alone was from its cradle essentially a planting state with slave labor. In Maryland, in Virginia, the custom of employing indented servants long prevailed; and the class of white laborers was always numerous; for no where in the United States is the climate more favor- Chap. XIII.} able to the Anglo-Saxon laborer than in Virg
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Spain at St. Augustine, the covetous Clarendon and his associates easily 1665 June 13. obtained from the king a new charter, which granted to them, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, all the land lying between twenty-nine degrees and Chap. XIII.} 1665. thirty-six degrees thirty minutes, north latitude; a territory extending seven and a half degrees from north to south, and more than forty degrees from east to west; comprising all the territory of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, much of Florida and Missouri, nearly all of Texas, and a large portion of Mexico. The soil, and, under the limitation of a nominal allegiance, the sovereignty also, were theirs, with the power of legislation, subject to the consent of the future freemen of the colony. The grant of privileges was ample, like those to Rhode Island and Connecticut. An express clause in the charter for Carolina opened the way for religious freedom; another held ou
York (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
; he despised gravity, as, what indeed it often is, the affectation of dulness; and thought it no condescension to charm by drollery. Himself without any veneration for prejudice or prescriptive usage, he never could estimate the difficulty of abrogating a form or overcoming a prejudice. His mind regarded purposes and results; and he did not so much defy appearances as rest ignorant of their power; an indifference, which, in some respects, was an immorality. Desiring to exclude the duke of York from the throne, no delicacy of sentiment restrained him from proposing the succession to the uncertain issue of an abandoned woman, who had once been mistress to the king; and he saw no cruelty in urging Charles II. to a divorce from a confiding wife, who had no blemish but barrenness. The same want of common feeling, joined to a surprising mobility, left Shaftesbury in ignorance of the energy of religious convictions. Skeptics are apt to be superstitious; the organization that favors t
North America (search for this): chapter 3
the materials of society, and adapt itself to every emergency and condition. South Carolina was a scene of turbulence till the constitutions were abandoned; and industry was unproductive till the colonists despised patronage and relied on themselves. It was in January, 1670, more than a month before 1670. Jan. the revised Model was signed, a considerable number of emigrants set sail for Carolina, which, both from climate and soil, was celebrated in advance as the beauty and envy of North America. Talbot, in dedication of Lederer. They were conducted by Joseph West, as commercial agent for the proprietaries, and by William Sayle, who was probably a Presbyterian, and having more than twenty years before made himself known as leader in an attempt to plant an Eleutheria in the isles of the Gulf of Florida, was now constituted a proprietary governor, with jurisdiction extending as far north as Cape Carteret, as far south as the Spaniards would tolerate. Having touched at Ireland
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
mselves on the River Cape Fear. Hardly had New England received within its bosom a few scanty colo plant in Carolina, promised emigrants from New England religious freedom, a governor and council tot prosper, the Indians took offence at the New England planters, and though they had no guns, yet we hope to find more facile people than the New England men. Yet they intrusted the affair entirelyion was swathed in independence. But not New England and Virginia only turned their eyes to the arendon. Make things easy to the people of New England, from thence the greatest supplies are expeeen increased by fresh emigrants 1665 from New England, and by a colony of ship-builders from the e had attracted none but small vessels from New England; and the mariners of Boston, guiding their tered by the refugees from Virginia and the New England men; and which, having been the effect of d the hall in Boston, where the eloquence of New England rocked the infant spirit of independence, w[4 more...]
Turones (France) (search for this): chapter 3
a land where the profession of their religion was a felony, where their estates were liable to be confiscated in favor of the apostate, where the preaching of their faith was a crime to be expiated on the wheel, where their children might be torn from them, to be subjected to the nearest Catholic relation, —the fugitives from Languedoc on the Mediterranean, from Rochelle, and Saintange, and Bordeaux, the provinces on the Bay of Biscay, from St. Quentin, Poictiers, and the beautiful valley of Tours, from St. Lo and Dieppe, men who had the virtues of the English Puritans, without their bigotry, came to the land to which the tolerant benevolence of Shaftesbury had invited the believer of every creed. From a land that had suffered its king, in wanton bigotry, to drive half a million of its best citizens into exile, they came to the land which was the hospitable refuge of the oppressed; where superstition and fanaticism, infidelity and faith, cold speculation and animated zeal, were alike
West Indies (search for this): chapter 3
of navigation could never be acceptable. There was little direct commerce between Albemarle and England; the new officers embarked for Carolina by way of the West Indies, where Eastchurch remained for a season; while Miller proceeded to the province, in which he was now to hold the triple office 1677. July of president or goverthe whites in the proportion of twenty-two to twelve; Letter from South Carolina, by a Swiss gentleman, p. 40. a proportion that had no parallel north of the West Indies. The changes that were taking place on the banks 167??? of the Hudson, had excited discontent; the rumor of wealth to be derived from the fertility of the ss an easy dupe of those in whom he most confided—of priests, and of a woman. The daughter of an adventurer,—for nearly ten years of childhood a resident in the West Indies, educated a Calvinist, but early converted to the Roman faith,—Madame de Maintenon, had, in the house of a burlesque poet, learned the art of conversation, and,<
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