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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Horatio Sharpe (search for this): chapter 14
We will none of us import British goods, said the traders in the towns. The inhabitants of North Carolina set up looms for weaving their own clothes, and South Carolina was ready to follow the example. The people, wrote the LieutenantGover-nor Sharpe, of Maryland, will go on upon manufactures. We will have homespun markets of linens and woollens, passed from mouth to mouth, till it found its way across the Atlantic, and alarmed the king in council; the ladies of the first fortune shall set tto wear a garment of their own spinning. A little attention to manufactures will make us ample amends for the distresses of the present day, and render us a great, rich, and happy people. Hutchinson's History. Pa. Gaz. N. Y. Gaz. Boston Gaz. Sharpe to Calvert, 10 July. Letter from Charleston, S. C. When the churchmen of New-York preached loyalty to the king as the Lord's anointed, The people, retorted William Livingston, are the Lord's anointed. Though named mob and rabble, the people
Oxenbridge Thacher (search for this): chapter 14
the resolves of Virginia were published to the world. They have spoken treason, said the royalists. Is it treason, retorted others, for the deputies of the people to assert their rights, or to give them away? Oh! those Virginians, cried Oxenbridge Thacher, from his deathbed, where, overplied by public exertions, he was wasting away with a hectic, those Virginians are men; they are noble spirits. I long to be out—to speak in court against tyranny, words that shall be read after my death. Wh to thine own house, David! Boston Gaz. 15 July. Who cares, said the more hardy, whether George or Louis is the sovereign, if both are alike? Otis, and many others. The beast of burden, continued others, asks not whose pack it carries. O. Thacher, and many others. I would bear allegiance to King George, said one who called himself a lover of truth, but not be a slave to his British subjects. Philalethes, in N. Y. Gaz. But the members of parliament, argued the chap. XIV.} 1765.
Richard Henry Lee (search for this): chapter 14
on, as fast as settled. Yet how comprehensive and how daring the idea! The traditions of the Board of Trade branded it as mutinous. Bladen, in Hutchinson, III. 109. Massachusetts had proceeded cautiously and almost timidly, naming for its delegates to the proposed Congress, with the patriot Otis, two others who were friends to government. Bladen, in Hutchinson, III. 109. Virginia was ready to convince the world that her people were firm and unanimous in the cause of liberty, R. H. Lee to L. Carter. but its newly-elected assembly was not suffered by Fauquier to come together. New Jersey received the circular letter of Massachusetts on the twentieth of June, the last day of the session of its legislature. The Speaker, a friend to the British government, at first inclined to urge sending delegates to the proposed Congress; but, on some advice from the governor, changed his mind, chap. XIV.} 1765. June. and the house, in the hurry preceding the adjournment, rather fr
Providence Gaz (search for this): chapter 14
inisterial cant, an infamous, atrocious, and nefarious crime. A colonist, murmured a Boston man who had dipped into Grenville's pamphlet, a colonist cannot make a horse-shoe or a hob-nail, but some ironmonger of Britain shall chap. XIV.} 1765. June. bawl that he is robbed by the American republican. Yes, they are even stupid enough, it was said in the town of Providence, to judge it criminal for us to become our own manufacturers. Colden's Corr. Boston Gazette. N. Y. Gazette. Providence Gaz. Lloyd's Conduct, &c. Newport Mercury. We will eat no lamb, promised the multitude, seeking to retaliate; we will wear no mourning at funerals. We will none of us import British goods, said the traders in the towns. The inhabitants of North Carolina set up looms for weaving their own clothes, and South Carolina was ready to follow the example. The people, wrote the LieutenantGover-nor Sharpe, of Maryland, will go on upon manufactures. We will have homespun markets of linens and w
Boston Gaz (search for this): chapter 14
es will make us ample amends for the distresses of the present day, and render us a great, rich, and happy people. Hutchinson's History. Pa. Gaz. N. Y. Gaz. Boston Gaz. Sharpe to Calvert, 10 July. Letter from Charleston, S. C. When the churchmen of New-York preached loyalty to the king as the Lord's anointed, The people, power of parliament and its jealousy of its own supremacy, you are cowards, was the answer; you are fools; you are parasites; or, rather, you are parricides. Boston Gaz. Otis's Considerations. N. Y. Gaz. Hutchinson's Correspondence. Power is a sad thing, said the Presbyterians of Philadelphia; our mother should remember wenswered the king, saying: What portion have we in David? what inheritance in the son of Jesse? To your tents, O Israel! Now see to thine own house, David! Boston Gaz. 15 July. Who cares, said the more hardy, whether George or Louis is the sovereign, if both are alike? Otis, and many others. The beast of burden, continued
George Grenville (search for this): chapter 14
rce and restrain manufactures, reasoned even the most patient, is to bid us make brick without straw. The northern colonies will be absolutely restricted from using any articles of clothing of their own fabric, predicted one colony to another. And men laughed as they added: catching a mouse within his majesty's colonies with a trap of our own making will be deemed, in the ministerial cant, an infamous, atrocious, and nefarious crime. A colonist, murmured a Boston man who had dipped into Grenville's pamphlet, a colonist cannot make a horse-shoe or a hob-nail, but some ironmonger of Britain shall chap. XIV.} 1765. June. bawl that he is robbed by the American republican. Yes, they are even stupid enough, it was said in the town of Providence, to judge it criminal for us to become our own manufacturers. Colden's Corr. Boston Gazette. N. Y. Gazette. Providence Gaz. Lloyd's Conduct, &c. Newport Mercury. We will eat no lamb, promised the multitude, seeking to retaliate; we
N. Y. Gazette (search for this): chapter 14
ns, such was the discourse at Boston, there is no drawing a line. And it is only the first step, repeated the New-York owners of large estates; a land tax for all America will be thought chap. XIV.} 1765. June of next. Boston Gazette. N. Y. Gazette. Hopkins's Grievances. Hutchinson's Correspondence. R. R. Livingston's Correspondence. It is plain, said even the calmest, Englishmen do not regard Americans as members of the same family, brothers, and equals, but as subordinates, bounXIV.} 1765. June. bawl that he is robbed by the American republican. Yes, they are even stupid enough, it was said in the town of Providence, to judge it criminal for us to become our own manufacturers. Colden's Corr. Boston Gazette. N. Y. Gazette. Providence Gaz. Lloyd's Conduct, &c. Newport Mercury. We will eat no lamb, promised the multitude, seeking to retaliate; we will wear no mourning at funerals. We will none of us import British goods, said the traders in the towns. The
or the distresses of the present day, and render us a great, rich, and happy people. Hutchinson's History. Pa. Gaz. N. Y. Gaz. Boston Gaz. Sharpe to Calvert, 10 July. Letter from Charleston, S. C. When the churchmen of New-York preached loyy, glorious liberty. The gospel, so preached Mayhew, of Boston, always, the gospel permits resistance. Sentinel, in N. Y. Gaz. Mayhew to Hollis. And then patriots would become maddened with remembering, that some high or low American had haas the answer; you are fools; you are parasites; or, rather, you are parricides. Boston Gaz. Otis's Considerations. N. Y. Gaz. Hutchinson's Correspondence. Power is a sad thing, said the Presbyterians of Philadelphia; our mother should rememng George, said one who called himself a lover of truth, but not be a slave to his British subjects. Philalethes, in N. Y. Gaz. But the members of parliament, argued the chap. XIV.} 1765. June. royalists, are men of the highest character fo
David Colden (search for this): chapter 14
th a trap of our own making will be deemed, in the ministerial cant, an infamous, atrocious, and nefarious crime. A colonist, murmured a Boston man who had dipped into Grenville's pamphlet, a colonist cannot make a horse-shoe or a hob-nail, but some ironmonger of Britain shall chap. XIV.} 1765. June. bawl that he is robbed by the American republican. Yes, they are even stupid enough, it was said in the town of Providence, to judge it criminal for us to become our own manufacturers. Colden's Corr. Boston Gazette. N. Y. Gazette. Providence Gaz. Lloyd's Conduct, &c. Newport Mercury. We will eat no lamb, promised the multitude, seeking to retaliate; we will wear no mourning at funerals. We will none of us import British goods, said the traders in the towns. The inhabitants of North Carolina set up looms for weaving their own clothes, and South Carolina was ready to follow the example. The people, wrote the LieutenantGover-nor Sharpe, of Maryland, will go on upon manufact
Gayarre Hist (search for this): chapter 14
bed, where, overplied by public exertions, he was wasting away with a hectic, those Virginians are men; they are noble spirits. I long to be out—to speak in court against tyranny, words that shall be read after my death. Why, said one of his friends, are not our rights and liberties as boldly asserted by every government in America as by Virginia? * * * Behold, cried another, a whole continent awakened, alarmed, restless, and disaffected. Letter of J. Adams. Boston Gazette. Hutchinson. Hist. III. Every where, from North to South—through the press, in letters, or as they met in private, for counsel, or in groups in the street, the chap. XIV.} 1765. June. Sons of Liberty told their griefs to one another, and planned retaliation or redress. No good reason can be given, observed the more calm among them, why the colonies should not modestly and soberly inquire, what right the parliament of Great Britain has to tax them. We were not sent out to be slaves, they continued, citin
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