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riots The pretended patriots, educated in a seminary of Democracy. Gage to Sir W. Johnson, 20 Sept. 1765. In New-York, the whole city roct. The sailors came from their shipping; the people flocked in, as Gage thought, by thousands; the number seemed to be still increasing; andterposed. Minutes of the Common Council of N. Y. 5 Nov. Colden to Gage, 5 Nov. They asked that the stamped paper should be delivered into tunequal to the protection of the inhabitants; Minutes of Council. Gage, being appealed to, Colden to Gage, 5 Nov. Gage to Colden, 5 Nov.Gage, 5 Nov. Gage to Colden, 5 Nov. Gage to Conway, 8 Nov. Colden to Conway, 9 Nov. avowed the belief, that a fire from the fort would be the signal for an insurrection, and theGage to Colden, 5 Nov. Gage to Conway, 8 Nov. Colden to Conway, 9 Nov. avowed the belief, that a fire from the fort would be the signal for an insurrection, and the commencement of a civil war. So the head of the province of New-York, and the military chief of all America, confessing their inability to sGage to Conway, 8 Nov. Colden to Conway, 9 Nov. avowed the belief, that a fire from the fort would be the signal for an insurrection, and the commencement of a civil war. So the head of the province of New-York, and the military chief of all America, confessing their inability to stop the anarchy, capitulated to the municipal body which represented the people. The stamps were taken to the City Hall; the city government
Richard Jackson (search for this): chapter 19
of all America, confessing their inability to stop the anarchy, capitulated to the municipal body which represented the people. The stamps were taken to the City Hall; the city government restored order; the press continued its activity, and in all the streets was heard the shout of Liberty, Property, and no Stamps. The thirst for revenge rankled in Colden's breast. The lawyers, he wrote to Conway, at a time when the government in England was still bent on enforcing the Stamp Act, R. Jackson to Bernard, 8 Nov. 1765. the lawyers of this place are the authors and conductors of the present sedition. If judges be sent from England, with an able Attorney- chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. General and Solicitor-General, to make examples of some very few, this colony will remain quiet. Others of his letters pointed plainly to John Morin Scott, Robert R. Livingston, and William Livingston, as suitable victims. At the same time, some of the churchmen avowed to one another their longing to se
orders; and chap. XIX.} 1765. Oct. not even to receive goods on commission, unless the Stamp Act be repealed. Thus a city, built on the ocean side, the chosen home of navigation, renounced all commerce; a people, who, as yet, had no manufactures, gave up every comfort from abroad, rather than continue trade at the peril of freedom. A committee of intercolonial correspondence was raised, and while James Delancy and others hesitated, the unflinching Isaac Sears, with Lamb, Mott, Wiley, and Robinson, assumed the post of greatest danger, and sent expresses R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 2 Nov. to invite the people of the neighboring governments to join in the league, justly confident they would follow the example of New-York. Friday, the first morning of November, broke Nov. upon a people unanimously resolved on nullifying the Stamp Act. From New Hampshire to the far South, the day was introduced by the tolling of muffled bells; minute-guns were fired, and pennants hoisted a
New London Gaz (search for this): chapter 19
. Nov. without apology or concealment, issued the Connecticut Gazette, filled with patriotic appeals; for, said he, the press is the test of truth, the bulwark of public safety, the guardian of freedom, and the people ought not to sacrifice it. Com. Gaz. No. 488, Friday, 1 Nov. 1765. Nor let the true lovers of their country pass unheeded the grave of Timothy Green, one of an illustrious family of printers, himself publisher of the New London Gazette, which had always modestly and fearlessly defended his country's rights; for on Friday, the first day of November, his journal came forth without stamps, and gave to the world a paper from the incomparable Stephen Johnson, of Lyme. New London Gaz. No. 108, Friday, 1 Nov. 1765. The liberty of free inquiry, said he, is one of the first and most fundamental of a free people. They have an undoubted right to be heard and relieved. They may publish their grievances; the press is open and free. We may go on to enjoy our rights
sted series of resolves, prepared by him, to ascertain the just rights of the province, which the preamble said had been lately drawn into question by the British parliament. The answer of the house was regarded in England as the ravings of a parcel of wild enthusiasts: in America, nothing was so much admired through the whole course of the controversy; and John Adams, who recorded at the time the applause which it won, said also, that of all the politicians of Boston, including Otis and Cushing, Samuel Adams had the most thorough understanding of liberty and her resources in the temper and character of the people, though not in the law and the constitution; as well as the most habitual radical love of it, and the most correct, genteel, and artful pen. He is a man, he continued, of refined policy, steadfast integrity, exquisite humanity, genteel erudition, obliging, engaging manners, real as well as professed piety, and a universal good character, unless it should be admitted tha
Samuel Adams (search for this): chapter 19
sed it, having been reassembled at Boston, and now cheered and invigorated by the presence of Samuel Adams, embodied in their reply to Bernard, the opinion on the power of parliament, from which the cecome disaffected. In addition to this state paper, which was the imprint; of the mind of Samuel Adams, Not of Otis. The paper has not the style of Otis, and does not express his opinions. Bewas made, performing his duty at New-York, as a member of Congress. The paper has the style of S. Adams, and expresses his sentiments exactly. Moreover, Hutchinson names him. Bernard's letters pointhout naming him. The lead of the committee was Samuel Dexter, who had the greatest regard for Samuel Adams. J. Adams: Works, II. 163, 181. and had the vigor and polished elegance of his style, the hoe which it won, said also, that of all the politicians of Boston, including Otis and Cushing, Samuel Adams had the most thorough understanding of liberty and her resources in the temper and character
David Colden (search for this): chapter 19
resolved to have the stamps distributed, wrote Colden to the British secretary, the day after the Co, the act would be quietly submitted to. David Colden to Commissioners of Stamp Office. Fort Georre of that. On the thirty-first of October, Colden and all he Oct. royal governors took the oathamp, or delay business for the want of one. Colden himself retired within the fort, and got from ments. On Saturday, the second of November, Colden gave way. The council questioned his authority Minutes of the Common Council of N. Y. 5 Nov. Colden to Gage, 5 Nov. They asked that the stamped pavernor and Council, and the military Viceroy. Colden pleaded his oath, to do his utmost, that every pleaded further the still greater contempt Colden to Maj. James, 6 Nov. into which the governmenappealed to, Colden to Gage, 5 Nov. Gage to Colden, 5 Nov. Gage to Conway, 8 Nov. Colden to ConwaColden to Conway, 9 Nov. avowed the belief, that a fire from the fort would be the signal for an insurrection, and [4 more...]
Robert R. Livingston (search for this): chapter 19
of freedom. A committee of intercolonial correspondence was raised, and while James Delancy and others hesitated, the unflinching Isaac Sears, with Lamb, Mott, Wiley, and Robinson, assumed the post of greatest danger, and sent expresses R. R. Livingston to R. Livingston, 2 Nov. to invite the people of the neighboring governments to join in the league, justly confident they would follow the example of New-York. Friday, the first morning of November, broke Nov. upon a people unanimously r. If judges be sent from England, with an able Attorney- chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. General and Solicitor-General, to make examples of some very few, this colony will remain quiet. Others of his letters pointed plainly to John Morin Scott, Robert R. Livingston, and William Livingston, as suitable victims. At the same time, some of the churchmen avowed to one another their longing to see the Archbishop of Canterbury display a little more of the resolution of a Laud or a Sextus Quintus; for what,
Timothy Green (search for this): chapter 19
of the Act. Honor, then, to the ingenious Benjamin Mecom, the boldhearted editor at New Haven, who on that morning, chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. without apology or concealment, issued the Connecticut Gazette, filled with patriotic appeals; for, said he, the press is the test of truth, the bulwark of public safety, the guardian of freedom, and the people ought not to sacrifice it. Com. Gaz. No. 488, Friday, 1 Nov. 1765. Nor let the true lovers of their country pass unheeded the grave of Timothy Green, one of an illustrious family of printers, himself publisher of the New London Gazette, which had always modestly and fearlessly defended his country's rights; for on Friday, the first day of November, his journal came forth without stamps, and gave to the world a paper from the incomparable Stephen Johnson, of Lyme. New London Gaz. No. 108, Friday, 1 Nov. 1765. The liberty of free inquiry, said he, is one of the first and most fundamental of a free people. They have an und
ess for the want of one. Colden himself retired within the fort, and got from the Coventry ship of war a detachment of marines. He would have fired on the people, but was menaced with being hanged like Porteus of Edinburgh, Paper delivered at the fort gate by an unknown land, 1 Nov. 1765. upon a sign-post, if he did so. In the evening a vast torchlight procession, carrying a scaffold and two images, one of the Governor, the other of the devil, came from the Fields, now the Park, down Broadway, to within ten or eight feet of the fort, knocked at its gate, broke open the Governor's coach-house, took out his chariot, carried the images upon it round town, and returned to burn them with his own carriages and sleighs, be- chap XIX.} 1765. Nov. fore his eyes, on the Bowling Green, under the gaze of the garrison on the ramparts, and of all New-York gathered round about. He has bound himself, they cried, by oath, to be the chief murderer of our rights. He was a rebel in Scotland,
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