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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ssachusetts State Papers, 187. make provision for the purposes mentioned in your messages. To his Majesty, rejoined Bernard in his last words, and if he pleases, to his Parliament, must be referred your invasion of the rights of the Imperial Sovereignty. By your own acts you will be judged. Your publications are plain and explicit, and need no comment. And he prorogued the General Court to the tenth of January. Their last message, he wrote to Hillsborough, exceeds every thing. Newport, Rhode Island, witnessed still bolder resistance. A vessel with a cargo of prohibited goods was rescued from the revenue officers, whose ship Chap. XLI.} 1769. July. named Liberty, was destroyed. Hulton, Temple, Paxton, to Gov. Pitkin, 7 Aug. 1769. William Reid's Affidavit. Representation to the King of Commissioners of Inquiry, 22 June, 1773. Just as this was heard of at Boston, Hillsborough's Circular promising relief from all real grievances and a repeal of the duties on glass, pape
Somerset (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 18
W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the Mississippi, i. 407, 408. In his peaceful habitation on the banks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV. 33, confounding perhaps the birth-place of his father, with that of Daniel Boone himself. Daniel himself does not seem to have thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, and Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 7, 8. as the Pioneer, describe a tract of land west of Virginia, as the richest in North America or in the worl
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
uted two Sons of Liberty in their stead. Cambridge charged Thomas Gardner, its representative, to use his best endeavors, that all their rights might be transmitted inviolable to the latest posterity; and the excellent man proved true to his New England town. Nor let history speak Chap. XLI.} 1769. May. the praise only of those who win glory in the field or high honors in the State; a place should be reserved for a husbandman like him, rich in the virtues of daily life, of calm and modest IV. 342-344. Miner's History of Wyoming. did not forget that by its Charter, its possessions extended indefinitely to the West; and a company of military Adventurers, headed by one of its most intelligent sons, Timothy Dwight's Travels in New England and New-York, i. 308. was also soliciting leave from the Government in England to lead forth a Colony to the southwestern banks of the Mississippi. W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette
Schuylkill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
he southwestern banks of the Mississippi. W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the Mississippi, i. 407, 408. In his peaceful habitation on the banks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV. 33, confounding perhaps the birth-place of his father, with that of Daniel Boone himself. Daniel himself does not seem to have thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, and Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 7, 8. as the Pioneer, describe a tract of land west of Virginia, a
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
taken. Of five hundred and eight votes that were cast, the four old representatives, Otis, Cushing, Samuel Adams, and Hancock, received more than five hundred. They were instructed to insist on the departure of the army from the town and Province; and not to pay any thing towards its support. Bradford's Hist of Mass. i. 180. Of the ninety-two who voted not to rescind, eighty-one, probably all who were candidates, were re-elected; of the seventeen rescinders, only five. Especially Salem condemned the conduct of its former representatives and substituted two Sons of Liberty in their stead. Cambridge charged Thomas Gardner, its representative, to use his best endeavors, that all their rights might be transmitted inviolable to the latest posterity; and the excellent man proved true to his New England town. Nor let history speak Chap. XLI.} 1769. May. the praise only of those who win glory in the field or high honors in the State; a place should be reserved for a husbandma
Aubry (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
r lesquelles il devait se lacher avec une espece de candeur et d'ingenuite pour exagerer les forces que j'avais à mes ordres, et ranimer l'esperance du public, I s'acquittat parfaitement de sa commission. O'Reilly to Grimaldi, N. O. 31 Aug. 1769. If you submit, he repeated publicly and by authority, the General will treat you with kindness, and you may have full confidence in the clemency of his Catholic Majesty. Aubry to the Minister; Gayarre, II. 292. These promises won faith; and with Aubry's concurrence a committee of three, Lafreniere for the Council, Marquis for the colonists, and Milhet for the merchants, waited on O'Reilly at the Balise, to recognise his authority and implore his mercy. O'Reilly, who had no fear except lest the lead- Aug. ing insurgents should escape into the English territory, Don Alexander O'Reilly to the Marquis of Grimaldi, New Orleans 31 August, 1769. welcomed the deputies with treacherous politeness and the fairest promises, 1 August, 1769,
North America (search for this): chapter 18
the western extremity of the continent; and to propose opening, by aid of Lakes and Rivers, a passage across the continent, as the best route for communicating with China and the East Indies. Carver's Travels through the interior parts of North America, in the years 1766, 1767, and 1768. Introduction, v. VI. Illinois invited emigrants more than ever; for its aboriginal inhabitants were fast disappearing from the earth. In April, 1769, Pontiac, so long the dreaded enemy of the English,lustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, and Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 7, 8. as the Pioneer, describe a tract of land west of Virginia, as the richest in North America or in the world. Filson's Discovery, Settlement and Present State of Kentucky, published in 1784, and authenticated by a certificate from Boone and Todd and Harrod. In May 1769, leaving his wife and offspring, having Finley as his pilot,
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
lsborough's Administration of the Colonies continued. May—August, 1769. Massachusetts had not only like Virginia to Chap. XLI.} 1769. May. assert the rights ofoxbury recommended a correspondence between the House of Representatives in Massachusetts, and the Assemblies of other Provinces. Bradford's Hist. of Mass. i. 1 Bowdoin, who had been chosen by a unanimous vote. Bradford's History of Massachusetts, i. 185. The House then considered the presence among them of troops, over entatives to the Governor's Message of May 31, 1769, June 13; in Bradford's Massachusetts State Papers, 169, 171. in a message to the Governor, represented that the n Imperial Rome, and the lawyers and farmers to whom the annual election of Massachusetts entrusted legislative power. One or the other must give way. After gravless with the duty we owe our constituents, so we shall NEVER Bradford's Massachusetts State Papers, 187. make provision for the purposes mentioned in your messag
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
rom the Government in England to lead forth a Colony to the southwestern banks of the Mississippi. W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the Mississippi, i. 407, 408. In his peaceful habitation on the banks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV. 33, confounding perhaps the birth-place of his father, with that of Daniel Boone himself. Daniel himself does not seem to have thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, and Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 7, 8. as
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ission. The King of Spain approved his acts; and the Council for the Indies found in his administration nothing but evidence of the immensity and sublimity of his genius. Gayarreas Hist. II. 378. Aubry perished on his voyage to France, in a ship which foundered in the Garonne. The son of Masan, one of those condemned to imprisonment, made his way to Madrid, offering himself as his father's substitute; by the aid of France the six prisoners were set free. The census of the city of New Orleans showed a population of eighteen hundred and one white persons, thirty-one free blacks, sixty-eight free persons of mixed blood; sixty domiciliated Indians; and twelve hundred and twenty-five slaves; in all three thousand one hundred and ninety souls. The whole population in the valley of the Mississippi, then subject to the Spanish sway, is estimated at thirteen thousand five hundred. The privileges which France had granted, were abolished, and the Colony was organized like other coloni
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