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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Pontiac (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Northwest; to recommend English settlements on the western extremity of the continent; and to propose opening, by aid of Lakes and Rivers, a passage across the continent, as the best route for communicating with China and the East Indies. Carver's Travels through the interior parts of North America, in the years 1766, 1767, and 1768. Introduction, v. VI. Illinois invited emigrants more than ever; for its aboriginal inhabitants were fast disappearing from the earth. In April, 1769, Pontiac, so long the dreaded enemy of the English, had been assassinated by an Illinois J. Campbell to Lieut. Governor Brown, 30 July, 1769. Indian without provocation and in time of peace; Gage to Sir William Johnson, 20 August, 1769. Gage to Hillsborough, 12 August, 1769. the Indians of the Northwest sent round belts to all the Nations to avenge the murder of their Chief. In vain did five or six hundred of the Illinois crowd for protection round the walls of Fort Char- Chap. XLI.} 1769.
Grasshopper creek (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
New-York, i. 308. was also soliciting leave from the Government in England to lead forth a Colony to the southwestern banks of the Mississippi. W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the Mississippi, i. 407, 408. In his peaceful habitation on the banks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV. 33, confounding perhaps the birth-place of his father, with that of Daniel Boone himself. Daniel himself does not seem to have thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, an
France (France) (search for this): chapter 18
for that Colony a secure and tranquil existence. A new petition to France expressed the inflexible resolve of the inhabitants to preserve thediction of the Spanish tribunal over actions done under the flag of France and during the prevalence of French laws. But the tribunal was ineth of October, the five martyrs to their Chap. XLI.} 1769. love of France and liberty, were brought forth pinioned, and in presence of the trenius. Gayarreas Hist. II. 378. Aubry perished on his voyage to France, in a ship which foundered in the Garonne. The son of Masan, one o Madrid, offering himself as his father's substitute; by the aid of France the six prisoners were set free. The census of the city of New O estimated at thirteen thousand five hundred. The privileges which France had granted, were abolished, and the Colony was organized like otheuck its victim to the The settlement of the wilderness, of which France had reserved no portion and Spain and England feared to develope th
Niles (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
t of land west of Virginia, as the richest in North America or in the world. Filson's Discovery, Settlement and Present State of Kentucky, published in 1784, and authenticated by a certificate from Boone and Todd and Harrod. In May 1769, leaving his wife and offspring, having Finley as his pilot, and four others as Chap. XLI.} 1769. companions, the Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 17. Morehead's Address, 17; compare J. M. Peck in the American Pioneers, i. 243. Boone died in 1820; Niles' Register, IV. 33, brings him into the world in 1730. Monette, i. 363, gives him a son of nearly twenty years old in 1773. Boone in his Narrative does not give the age of the son. young man, of about three and twenty, wandered forth through the wilderness of America, in quest of the country of Kentucky, The Adventures of Col. Daniel Boon, formerly a Hunter, &c. &c. dictated by himself to John Filson. known to the Savages as the Dark and Bloody Ground, the Middle Ground between the subje
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ed into the Pacific; and he now returned to claim reward for his discoveries, to celebrate the richness of the copper mines of the Northwest; to recommend English settlements on the western extremity of the continent; and to propose opening, by aid of Lakes and Rivers, a passage across the continent, as the best route for communicating with China and the East Indies. Carver's Travels through the interior parts of North America, in the years 1766, 1767, and 1768. Introduction, v. VI. Illinois invited emigrants more than ever; for its aboriginal inhabitants were fast disappearing from the earth. In April, 1769, Pontiac, so long the dreaded enemy of the English, had been assassinated by an Illinois J. Campbell to Lieut. Governor Brown, 30 July, 1769. Indian without provocation and in time of peace; Gage to Sir William Johnson, 20 August, 1769. Gage to Hillsborough, 12 August, 1769. the Indians of the Northwest sent round belts to all the Nations to avenge the murder of the
Haverhill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
the Assembly Message from the Governor, 28 June, 1769; Bradford, 175, 176. his order to repair to England, and, citing Chap. XLI. 1769. June. a royal instruction on the subject of provincial grants for the support of Government, coupled his new demand of a year's salary with an intimation, that he should give his assent to no Act, which the grant did not precede. The House, having disdainfully rejected his de- July. mand, Answer of the House of Representatives, 4 July, 1769; in Bradford, 180, 181. adopted nearly word for word the three Resolutions of Virginia Bradford's State Papers, 176, 177, and 180. on taxation, Compare S. Cooper to T. Pownall, 12 July, 1769. intercolonial correspondence, and trial by a jury of the vicinage. They also enumerated their grievances, and declared the establishment of a standing army in the Colony, in a time of peace, without consent of its General Assembly, an invasion of the natural and chartered rights of the people. For the tro
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ent man proved true to his New England town. Nor let history speak Chap. XLI.} 1769. May. the praise only of those who win glory in the field or high honors in the State; a place should be reserved for a husbandman like him, rich in the virtues of daily life, of calm and modest courage, of a character trustworthy and unassuming, who was sent from cultivating his fields to take part in legislation, and carried to his task a discerning mind and an intrepid and guileless heart.—The town of Roxbury recommended a correspondence between the House of Representatives in Massachusetts, and the Assemblies of other Provinces. Bradford's Hist. of Mass. i. 181. Meantime, Bernard received letters, destroying his hope of an appointment in Virginia, and calling him to England. The blow came on him unexpectedly; as he was procuring settlers for his wild lands, and promising himself a long and secure enjoyment of the emoluments of office under military protection. True to his character,
ve thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, and Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 7, 8. as the Pioneer, describe a tract of land west of Virginia, as the richest in North America or in the world. Filson's Discovery, Settlement and Present State of Kentucky, published in 1784, and authenticated by a certificate from Boone and Todd and Harrod. In May 1769, leaving his wife and offspring, having Finley as his pilot, and four others as Chap. XLI.} 1769. companions, the Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 17. Morehead's Address, 17; compare J. M. Peck in the American Pioneers, i. 243. Boone died in 1820; Niles' Register, IV. 33, brings him into the world in 1730. Monette, i. 363, gives him a son of nearly twenty years old in 1773. Boone in his Narrative does not give the age of the son. young man, of about three and twenty,
Gayarree Hist (search for this): chapter 18
d fifty of the principal inhabitants to make a representation to me of their grievances, which is now preparing for the press, demanding to become English subjects, and to settle at the Natchez. but the Governor at Pensacola abstained from offending powers with which his Sovereign was at peace. The dread of Spain and its Government occasioned the daring design of founding a Republic with a Council of forty, to be elected by the people, and an executive chief to be called a protector. Gayarree Hist. II. 337. It was even proposed, if Louisiana was to be given up to his Catholic Majesty, to burn New Orleans to the ground, and leave to an unwelcome master, nothing but a desert. When near the end of July, it was told that O'Reilly had arrived at the Balise with an overwhelming force, despair prevailed for a moment; and white cockades were distributed by the Republicans. Acte d'accnsation in Gayarre. O'Reilly is not Chap. XLI.} 1769. July. come to ruin the Colony, said Aubry, who
nd the gates of the city, during the session of the Assembly. Message from the House of Representatives to the Governor, 31 May, 1769, the day of general election. Gentlemen, said Bernard, in reply to what he thought insolent terms, I have no authority over his Majesty's ships in this port, or his troops in this town; nor can I give any orders for the removal of the same. On the election of Councillors, he disapprov- Chap. XLI.} 1769. May. ed of no less than eleven; among them of Brattle and Bowdoin, who had been chosen by a unanimous vote. Bradford's History of Massachusetts, i. 185. The House then considered the presence among them of troops, over whom the Governor avowed that the civil power in the Province did not extend. At that very time Gage, who had been intrusted with discretionary authority to withdraw the forces from Boston, ordered two regiments to Halifax, and required Bernard's written opinion respecting the proper disposition of the rest. Gage to Macka
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