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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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John F. Schermerhorn (search for this): chapter 18
1769. Indian without provocation and in time of peace; Gage to Sir William Johnson, 20 August, 1769. Gage to Hillsborough, 12 August, 1769. the Indians of the Northwest sent round belts to all the Nations to avenge the murder of their Chief. In vain did five or six hundred of the Illinois crowd for protection round the walls of Fort Char- Chap. XLI.} 1769. tres; the ruthless spirit of reciprocal murder was not appeased, till the Illinois tribes were nearly all exterminated, John F. Schermerhorn's Report concerning the Indians inhabiting the Western Parts of the United States; Mass. Hist. Coll. XII. 8. and their beautiful and fertile plains, cooled during the summer by the ever blowing West wind, were left vacant for the white man. Connecticut which at this time was exercising a disputed jurisdiction in the valley of Wyoming, Compare Minutes of the Provincial Council, in Pennsylvania Colonial Records, IX. 606-609. Pennsylvania Archives, IV. 342-344. Miner's History of
seem to have thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, and Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 7, 8. as the Pioneer, describe a tract of land west of Virginia, as the richest in North America or in the world. Filson's Discovery, Settlement and Present State of Kentucky, published in 1784, and authenticated by a certificate from Boone and Todd and Harrod. In May 1769, leaving his wife and offspring, having Finley as his pilot, and four others as Chap. XLI.} 1769. companions, the Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 17. Morehead's Address, 17; compare J. M. Peck in the American Pioneers, i. 243. Boone died in 1820; Niles' Register, IV. 33, brings him into the world in 1730. Monette, i. 363, gives him a son of nearly twenty years old in 1773. Boone in his Narrative does not give the age of the son. young man, of about three an
Joseph Trumbull (search for this): chapter 18
in Pennsylvania Colonial Records, IX. 606-609. Pennsylvania Archives, IV. 342-344. Miner's History of Wyoming. did not forget that by its Charter, its possessions extended indefinitely to the West; and a company of military Adventurers, headed by one of its most intelligent sons, Timothy Dwight's Travels in New England and New-York, i. 308. was also soliciting leave from the Government in England to lead forth a Colony to the southwestern banks of the Mississippi. W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the Mississippi, i. 407, 408. In his peaceful habitation on the banks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV.
J. T. Morehead (search for this): chapter 18
a, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV. 33, confounding perhaps the birth-place of his father, with that of Daniel Boone himself. Daniel himself does not seem to have thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the namen 1784, and authenticated by a certificate from Boone and Todd and Harrod. In May 1769, leaving his wife and offspring, having Finley as his pilot, and four others as Chap. XLI.} 1769. companions, the Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 17. Morehead's Address, 17; compare J. M. Peck in the American Pioneers, i. 243. Boone died in 1820; Niles' Register, IV. 33, brings him into the world in 1730. Monette, i. 363, gives him a son of nearly twenty years old in 1773. Boone in his Narrative do
William Johnson (search for this): chapter 18
th China and the East Indies. Carver's Travels through the interior parts of North America, in the years 1766, 1767, and 1768. Introduction, v. VI. Illinois invited emigrants more than ever; for its aboriginal inhabitants were fast disappearing from the earth. In April, 1769, Pontiac, so long the dreaded enemy of the English, had been assassinated by an Illinois J. Campbell to Lieut. Governor Brown, 30 July, 1769. Indian without provocation and in time of peace; Gage to Sir William Johnson, 20 August, 1769. Gage to Hillsborough, 12 August, 1769. the Indians of the Northwest sent round belts to all the Nations to avenge the murder of their Chief. In vain did five or six hundred of the Illinois crowd for protection round the walls of Fort Char- Chap. XLI.} 1769. tres; the ruthless spirit of reciprocal murder was not appeased, till the Illinois tribes were nearly all exterminated, John F. Schermerhorn's Report concerning the Indians inhabiting the Western Parts of t
self to John Filson. known to the Savages as the Dark and Bloody Ground, the Middle Ground between the subjects of the Five Nations and the Cherokees. Filson in Imlay's Topographical Description of the Western Territory; Third Ed. 308. After a long and fatiguing journey through mountain ranges, the party found themselves in Junemunition, leaving the renowned hunter by himself, without bread, or salt, or sugar, or even a horse or dog. The idea of a beloved wife Boone's Autobiography in Imlay, 341. anxious for his safety, tinged his thoughts with sadness; but otherwise the cheerful, meditative man, careless of wealth, knowing the use of the rifle, not tn he had discovered. All things were still. All things were still.—Not a breeze shook the most tremulous leaf.—I kindled a fire, &c. &c. Boone's Autobiography in Imlay, 342. Not a breeze so much as shook a leaf. He kindled a fire near a fountain of sweet water, and feasted on the loin of a buck. He was no more alone than a bee
Timothy Dwight (search for this): chapter 18
he ever blowing West wind, were left vacant for the white man. Connecticut which at this time was exercising a disputed jurisdiction in the valley of Wyoming, Compare Minutes of the Provincial Council, in Pennsylvania Colonial Records, IX. 606-609. Pennsylvania Archives, IV. 342-344. Miner's History of Wyoming. did not forget that by its Charter, its possessions extended indefinitely to the West; and a company of military Adventurers, headed by one of its most intelligent sons, Timothy Dwight's Travels in New England and New-York, i. 308. was also soliciting leave from the Government in England to lead forth a Colony to the southwestern banks of the Mississippi. W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the Mississippi, i. 407, 408. In his peaceful habitation on the banks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvan
urate accounts of that Great River, which bore, as he reported, the name of Oregon The Oregon or the River of the West. Carver's Travels, 76. and flowed into the Pacific; and he now returned to claim reward for his discoveries, to celebrate the richness of the copper mines of the Northwest; to recommend English settlements on the western extremity of the continent; and to propose opening, by aid of Lakes and Rivers, a passage across the continent, as the best route for communicating with China and the East Indies. Carver's Travels through the interior parts of North America, in the years 1766, 1767, and 1768. Introduction, v. VI. Illinois invited emigrants more than ever; for its aboriginal inhabitants were fast disappearing from the earth. In April, 1769, Pontiac, so long the dreaded enemy of the English, had been assassinated by an Illinois J. Campbell to Lieut. Governor Brown, 30 July, 1769. Indian without provocation and in time of peace; Gage to Sir William Joh
e to Hillsborough, 12 August, 1769. the Indians of the Northwest sent round belts to all the Nations to avenge the murder of their Chief. In vain did five or six hundred of the Illinois crowd for protection round the walls of Fort Char- Chap. XLI.} 1769. tres; the ruthless spirit of reciprocal murder was not appeased, till the Illinois tribes were nearly all exterminated, John F. Schermerhorn's Report concerning the Indians inhabiting the Western Parts of the United States; Mass. Hist. Coll. XII. 8. and their beautiful and fertile plains, cooled during the summer by the ever blowing West wind, were left vacant for the white man. Connecticut which at this time was exercising a disputed jurisdiction in the valley of Wyoming, Compare Minutes of the Provincial Council, in Pennsylvania Colonial Records, IX. 606-609. Pennsylvania Archives, IV. 342-344. Miner's History of Wyoming. did not forget that by its Charter, its possessions extended indefinitely to the West; and a compan
Charles Paxton (search for this): chapter 18
the rights of the Imperial Sovereignty. By your own acts you will be judged. Your publications are plain and explicit, and need no comment. And he prorogued the General Court to the tenth of January. Their last message, he wrote to Hillsborough, exceeds every thing. Newport, Rhode Island, witnessed still bolder resistance. A vessel with a cargo of prohibited goods was rescued from the revenue officers, whose ship Chap. XLI.} 1769. July. named Liberty, was destroyed. Hulton, Temple, Paxton, to Gov. Pitkin, 7 Aug. 1769. William Reid's Affidavit. Representation to the King of Commissioners of Inquiry, 22 June, 1773. Just as this was heard of at Boston, Hillsborough's Circular promising relief from all real grievances and a repeal of the duties on glass, paper and colors, as contrary to the true principles of commerce, was received by Bernard, and was immediately made public. At once the merchants, assembling on the twenty-seventh of July, voted unanimously, that this part
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