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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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July 10th, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
ual, drawn on a perennial fund raised by an Act of Parliament. They regarded the Charter as a most solemn compact, which bound them to Great Britain. By that Charter they held, they were to have a Governor and Judges, over whom the power of the King was protected by the right of nomination, the power of the Colony by the exclusive right of providing support. These views were embodied Hutchinson's History, III. 358. by Hawley in a Report to the Assembly, Report and Resolutions of 10 July, 1772; in Bradford, 325 and on the tenth of July, adopted by a vote of eighty-five to nineteen. It followed, and was so resolved, that a Governor who like Hutchinson was Chap. XLVII.} 1772. July. not dependent on the people for support, was not such a Governor as the people had consented to, at the granting of the Charter; the House most solemnly protested that the innovation was an im portant change of the Constitution, and exposed the Province to a despotic administration of Government.
October 17th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
t. 1771. Hutchinson, too, reported a disposition in all the Colonies to let the controversy with the kingdom subside. Hutchinson to Gov Pownall, 14 October, 1771. The King sent word to tempt Hancock by marks of favor. Hancock and most of the party, said the Governor, are quiet; and all of them, except Adams, abate of their virulence. Adams would push the Continent into a rebellion to-morrow, if it was in his power. Hutchinson to John Pownall, Secretary to the Board of Trade, 17 October, 1771. While America generally was so tranquil, Samuel Adams continued musing till the fire within him burned; and the thought of correspondence and union among the friends of liberty flashed upon his mind. It would be an arduous task, he said, meditating a project which required a year's reflection for its maturity, to awaken a sufficient number in the colonies to so grand an undertaking. Nothing, however, should be despaired of. We have nothing, he continued, to rely upon but the interpos
July 11th, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
rew, and then set it on fire. Lieutenant Dudingston to Admiral Montagu, 12 June, 1772; William Checkley to Commissioner of Customs, 12 June, 1772; Governor Wanton to Hillsborough, 16 June, 1772; Admiral Montagu to Hillsborough, 12 June and 11 July, 1772; Deposition of Aaron, a negro, 11 July, 1772; Letter of Charles Dudley, 23 July, 1772. The whole was conducted on a sudden impulse; Representation to the King of the Commissioners of Inquiry, 22 June, 1773. yet Sandwich who was spoken of f11 July, 1772; Letter of Charles Dudley, 23 July, 1772. The whole was conducted on a sudden impulse; Representation to the King of the Commissioners of Inquiry, 22 June, 1773. yet Sandwich who was spoken of for the place of Colonial Secretary of State, resolved never to leave pursuing the Colony of Rhode Island, until its Charter should be taken away. Hutchinson to Samuel Hood, 2 Sept. 1772. Remembrancer for 1776, II. 60. A few punished at Execution Dock, would be the only effectual preventive of any further at- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. June. tempt, wrote Hutchinson, who wished to see a beginnin of taking men prisoners, and carrying them directly to England. T. Hutchinson to Capt. Gambier, Bos
July 17th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
ial income tax; and Hillsborough, disregard- Chap. XLVII.} 1771. July. ing a usage of more than fifty years, commanded the compliance of the legislature. The engrossed taxbill for the year was of the same tenor with the annual Acts from time immemorial. The assessors had moreover rated the Commissioners with extreme moderation. Persons who had less income, were taxed as much as they, so that it did not even appear that any regard was had to their salaries. Hutchinson to——, Boston, 17 July, 1771. Paxton's provincial tax for all his personal estate and all his income, was for the last year less than three pounds sterling; and what he paid to the town and county not much more. Hutchinson to——, 19 July, 1771. And to defeat this little tax, in itself so reasonable, so consonant to usage, and in its apportionment so forbearing, Hutchinson, on the fourth of July, greatly against his own judgment, negatived the Bill, and declared his obligation under his instructions to negative an
July 19th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
the annual Acts from time immemorial. The assessors had moreover rated the Commissioners with extreme moderation. Persons who had less income, were taxed as much as they, so that it did not even appear that any regard was had to their salaries. Hutchinson to——, Boston, 17 July, 1771. Paxton's provincial tax for all his personal estate and all his income, was for the last year less than three pounds sterling; and what he paid to the town and county not much more. Hutchinson to——, 19 July, 1771. And to defeat this little tax, in itself so reasonable, so consonant to usage, and in its apportionment so forbearing, Hutchinson, on the fourth of July, greatly against his own judgment, negatived the Bill, and declared his obligation under his instructions to negative any other, drawn in the same usual terms. The stopping supplies by a veto of the Crown was unknown in England; an order from the King to exempt special individuals from their share of taxation was unconstitutional; t
April 8th, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
at Vincennes, Hillsborough was less relenting; for there was no Spanish shore to which they could fly. They were, by formal proclamation, peremptorily commanded to retire within the jurisdiction of some one of the Colonies. Proclamation of 8 April, 1772. Compare Gage to Hillsborough, 4 March, 1772. But the men Compare Inhabitants of Vincennes to Gage, 18 Sept. 1772, and Memorial of the same date. of Indiana were as unwilling to abandon their homes in a settlement already seventy years olken in molesting them to me. As sure as the people of Newport attempt to rescue any vessel, and any of them Compare W. S. Johnson to R. Jackson, 30 May, 1772. are taken, I will hang them as pirates. Montagu to J. Wanton, Esq., Boston, 8 April, 1772. J. Wanton to Rear Admiral Montagu, 8 May, 1772. Dudings- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. June. ton seconded the insolence of his superior officer, insulted the inhabitants, plundered the islands of sheep and hogs, cut down trees, fired at market boats
March 25th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
pledge of relenting; and his plausible professions hushed the people into silence. The glorious spirit of liberty is vanquished and left without hope but in a miracle, said desponding patriots. I confess, said Samuel Adams, we have, as Wolfe expressed it, a choice of difficulties. Too many flatter themselves that their pusillanimity is true prudence; but in perilous times like these, I cannot conceive of prudence without fortitude. Compare Samuel Adams to James Warren of Plymouth, 25 March, 1771. He persever- Chap. XLVII.} 1771. June. ed; but John Adams retired from the service of the people, and devoting himself to his profession, John Adams: Works, II. 260, 301, 302. for a time ceased even to employ his pen in their defence. John Adams: Diary, June 22, 1771. Otis who had returned to the Legislature, disordered in mind, and jealous of his declining influence, did but impede the public cause. In Hancock, also, vanity so mingled with patriotism, that the Government hoped
July 21st, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
, obedience would no longer be due to the Governor, and the rightful dependence on England would be at an end. Deceived by the want of organized union among the Colonies, Hutchinson sent word to Hillsborough, that if the nation would arouse and unite in measures to retain the Colonies in subordination, all this new doctrine of independence would be disavowed, and its first inventors be sacrificed to the rage of the people whom they had deluded. Hutchinson to Secretary John Pownall, 21 July, 1772; in Remembrancer, 1776, II. 57. The Secretary, on his Aug. part, was proceeding with eager haste to carry Townshend's system into effect; and on the seventh of August, he announced, that the King, with the entire concurrence of Lord North, Compare Hillsborough to Hutchinson, 6 June, 1772. had made provision for the support of his law servants in the Province of Massachusetts Bay. Hillsborough to Lords of Trade, 27 July, 1772, and to Hutchinson, 7 August, 1772. It was almost a spec
July 23rd, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
and Joseph Brown of Providence, and Simeon Potter of Bristol, boarded the stranded schooner, after a scuffle in which Dudingston was wounded, took and landed its crew, and then set it on fire. Lieutenant Dudingston to Admiral Montagu, 12 June, 1772; William Checkley to Commissioner of Customs, 12 June, 1772; Governor Wanton to Hillsborough, 16 June, 1772; Admiral Montagu to Hillsborough, 12 June and 11 July, 1772; Deposition of Aaron, a negro, 11 July, 1772; Letter of Charles Dudley, 23 July, 1772. The whole was conducted on a sudden impulse; Representation to the King of the Commissioners of Inquiry, 22 June, 1773. yet Sandwich who was spoken of for the place of Colonial Secretary of State, resolved never to leave pursuing the Colony of Rhode Island, until its Charter should be taken away. Hutchinson to Samuel Hood, 2 Sept. 1772. Remembrancer for 1776, II. 60. A few punished at Execution Dock, would be the only effectual preventive of any further at- Chap. XLVII.} 1772.
April, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
rwhelming evil was debated by the King in Council, and on the tenth day of December, 1770, he issued an instruction, under his own hand, commanding the Governor, upon pain of the highest displeasure, to assent to no law, by which the importation of slaves should be in any respect prohibited or obstructed. Order in Council of 9 December, 1770. George R. Additional instructions to our Lieutenant and Governor General, of our Colony and Dominion of Virginia in America, 10 December, 1770. In April 1772, this rigorous order was solemnly debated in the Assembly of Virginia. They were very anxious for an Act to restrain the introduction of people, the number of whom already in the Colony, gave them just cause to apprehend the most dangerous consequences, and therefore made it necessary that they should fall upon means not only of preventing their increase, but also of lessening their number. The interest of the country, it was said, manifestly requires the total expulsion of them. Dunmo
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