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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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February 11th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
rough's Administration of the Colonies con-cluded. June. 1771—August, 1772. the King steadily pursued the system of concen- Chap. XLVII.} 1771. June. trating all power over the Colonies; but so gradually that a sudden, complete collision with ancient usage was avoided. If the Charter of the Province had been taken away, Compare Massachusetts Gazette, 21 Jan. 1771. even the moderate would have held themselves absolved from their allegiance. Compare Brutus in Boston Gazette of 11 Feb. 1771; 827, 1, 1, and of Monday, 4 March, 830, 1, 2; and letters of Eliot and Cooper. But the appointment of a native Bostonian as Governor, seemed to many a pledge of relenting; and his plausible professions hushed the people into silence. The glorious spirit of liberty is vanquished and left without hope but in a miracle, said desponding patriots. I confess, said Samuel Adams, we have, as Wolfe expressed it, a choice of difficulties. Too many flatter themselves that their pusillanimity is
September 18th, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
ormal proclamation, peremptorily commanded to retire within the jurisdiction of some one of the Colonies. Proclamation of 8 April, 1772. Compare Gage to Hillsborough, 4 March, 1772. But the men Compare Inhabitants of Vincennes to Gage, 18 Sept. 1772, and Memorial of the same date. of Indiana were as unwilling to abandon their homes in a settlement already seventy years old, Notre établissement est de soixante et dix annees, Memorial, 18 Sept. 1772. as those of Illinois to give up the ho18 Sept. 1772. as those of Illinois to give up the hope of freedom. The spirit of discontent pervaded every village in the wilderness; and what allegiance would men of French origin bear to a British King who proposed to take away their estates and to deny them liberty? The log cabins having been planted, and hopes of self-government called into existence, it Chap. XLVII.} 1772. April. was beyond the power of the British King to remove the one or the other. The inhabitants of Virginia were controlled by the central authority on a subject
June 6th, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
ubordination, all this new doctrine of independence would be disavowed, and its first inventors be sacrificed to the rage of the people whom they had deluded. Hutchinson to Secretary John Pownall, 21 July, 1772; in Remembrancer, 1776, II. 57. The Secretary, on his Aug. part, was proceeding with eager haste to carry Townshend's system into effect; and on the seventh of August, he announced, that the King, with the entire concurrence of Lord North, Compare Hillsborough to Hutchinson, 6 June, 1772. had made provision for the support of his law servants in the Province of Massachusetts Bay. Hillsborough to Lords of Trade, 27 July, 1772, and to Hutchinson, 7 August, 1772. It was almost a special provision for Hutchinson's family. It marks the character of the people, that this act, constituting judges, who held their offices at the King's pleasure, stipendiaries of the Crown, was selected as the crisis Chap. XLVII.} 1772. Aug. of revolution. Meantime Hillsborough was left wi
January 18th, 1773 AD (search for this): chapter 24
ulsion of them. Dunmore to Hillsborough, 1 May, 1772. Anthony Benezet to Granville Sharp, 14 May, 1772. Jefferson, like Richard Henry Lee, had begun his legislative career by efforts for emancipation. To the Chap. XLVII.} 1772. April. mind of Patrick Henry, the thought of slavery darkened the picture of the future, even while he cherished faith in the ultimate abolition of an evil, which, though the law sanctioned, religion opposed. Compare Patrick Henry to Anthony Benezet, 18 Jan. 1773; in Robert Vaux's Life of Benezet. To have approached Parliament with a Petition against the Slave-Trade might have seemed a recognition of its supreme legislative power; Virginia, therefore, resolved to address the King himself, who in Council had cruelly compelled the toleration of the nefarious traffic. They pleaded with him for leave to protect themselves against the crimes of commercial avarice, and these were their words: The importation of slaves into the Colonies from the C
February 5th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
ould become known in America, and lest Temple, who had gone to England and bore him contemptuous hatred, should estrange from him the confidence of Whately. Confirmed by the seeming tranquillity in America, and by the almost unprecedented strength of the Ministry in Parliament, Hillsborough gave free scope to the conceit, wrongheadedness, obstinacy and passion, which marked his character, and perplexed and embarrassed affairs by the perverse and senseless B. Franklin to S. Cooper, 5 February, 1771. exercise of authority. To show his firmness, he still required the Legislature of Massachusetts to exempt the Commissioners from taxation, or the tax bill should be negatived; while Gage was enjoined to attend to the security of the fortress in Boston harbor. In Georgia, Noble Wimberly Jones, a man of exemplary life and character, had been elected Speaker. Wright, who reported him to be a very strong Liberty Boy, would not consent to the choice; and the House voted the interferenc
ffections of South Carolina were still more 1772. Jan. thoroughly alienated. Its public men were ruled by their sense of honor, and felt a stain upon it as a wound. A Carolinian in the time of Lyttleton, had been abruptly dismissed from the King's Council; and from that day it became the pride of native Carolinians not to accept a seat in that body. Correspondence of Lieut. Gov. Bull. The members of the Assembly disdained to take any pay for their attendance. State of South Carolina, 1770. Since March 1771, no legislative Act had been perfected, Statutes at large, IV. 331. because the Governor refused to pass any appropriations which should cover the grant of the Assembly to the Society for the Bill of Rights; but the patriot planters ever stood ready to lend their private credit and purses to the wants of their own colonial Agents or Committees. To extend the benefit of Courts of Justice into the interior, the Province, at an expense of five thousand pounds, Ramsey's H
r stood ready to lend their private credit and purses to the wants of their own colonial Agents or Committees. To extend the benefit of Courts of Justice into the interior, the Province, at an expense of five thousand pounds, Ramsey's History of South Carolina, II. 126. bought out the monopoly of Richard Cumberland as Provost by patent for the whole; and had offered to establish salaries for the Judges, if the Commissions of those Judges were but made permanent as in England. At last, in 1769, trusting to the honor of the Crown, they voted perpe- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. Jan. tual grants of salaries. When this was done, Rawlins Lowndes and others, their own judges, taken from among themselves, were dismissed; and an Irishman, a Scotchman, and a Welshman were sent over by Hillsborough to take their places. Compare List of Judges in South Carolina Statutes at large, i. 439; Ramsey, i. 214, II. 126. We, none of us, said the planters, can expect the honors of the State; they are all
May 30th, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
of a trespass, if not piracy. The Governor, therefore, sent a sheriff on board the Gaspee, to ascertain by what orders the Lieutenant acted; and Dudingston referred the subject to the Admiral. The Admiral answered from Boston: The Lieutenant, Sir, has done his duty. I shall give the King's officers directions, that they send every man taken in molesting them to me. As sure as the people of Newport attempt to rescue any vessel, and any of them Compare W. S. Johnson to R. Jackson, 30 May, 1772. are taken, I will hang them as pirates. Montagu to J. Wanton, Esq., Boston, 8 April, 1772. J. Wanton to Rear Admiral Montagu, 8 May, 1772. Dudings- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. June. ton seconded the insolence of his superior officer, insulted the inhabitants, plundered the islands of sheep and hogs, cut down trees, fired at market boats, detained vessels without a colorable pretext, and made illegal seizures of goods of which the recovery cost more than they were worth Gov. Wanton to Se
September 2nd, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
ssioners of Inquiry, 22 June, 1773. yet Sandwich who was spoken of for the place of Colonial Secretary of State, resolved never to leave pursuing the Colony of Rhode Island, until its Charter should be taken away. Hutchinson to Samuel Hood, 2 Sept. 1772. Remembrancer for 1776, II. 60. A few punished at Execution Dock, would be the only effectual preventive of any further at- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. June. tempt, wrote Hutchinson, who wished to see a beginnin of taking men prisoners, and carryihen he was gone, Thurlow Knox: Extra Official State Papers, II. 45. took care that the grant for the Western Province should never be sealed; and the amiable Dartmouth, Chap. XLVII.} 1772. Aug. who became Secretary for the Colonies, had been taught to believe, Compare Dartmouth to Hutchinson, 2 September, 1772. I have been always taught to believe, &c. &c. like Lord North and the King, that it was necessary to carry out the policy of consolidation, as set forth in Townshend's Preamble.
resolved never to leave pursuing the Colony of Rhode Island, until its Charter should be taken away. Hutchinson to Samuel Hood, 2 Sept. 1772. Remembrancer for 1776, II. 60. A few punished at Execution Dock, would be the only effectual preventive of any further at- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. June. tempt, wrote Hutchinson, who wishoners, and carrying them directly to England. T. Hutchinson to Capt. Gambier, Boston, 30 June, 1772; in Hutchinson's Papers, III. 354, 355; and Remembrancer for 1776, II. 56. There now existed a statute authorizing such a procedure. Two months before, the King had assented to an Act for the better securing Dock-yards, ships aned, and its first inventors be sacrificed to the rage of the people whom they had deluded. Hutchinson to Secretary John Pownall, 21 July, 1772; in Remembrancer, 1776, II. 57. The Secretary, on his Aug. part, was proceeding with eager haste to carry Townshend's system into effect; and on the seventh of August, he announced, tha
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