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t to the Charter and the laws. The Protest had hardly been adopted, when the July. application of its doctrines became necessary. The Commissioners of the Customfrom the colonial income tax; and Hillsborough, disregard- Chap. XLVII.} 1771. July. ing a usage of more than fifty years, commanded the compliance of the legislatuevied and extorted from those, who, if they have property, Chap. XLVII.} 1771. July. have a right to the absolute disposal of it. To withhold your assent to this bind Franklin foretold a bloody struggle, in which America's Chap. XLVII.} 1771. July. growing strength and magnitude, B. Franklin to Committee of Correspondence i county in Great Britain. Of this statute, which violated every safeguard of July. justice and might be still more mischievous as a precedent, the Assembly of Masd was so resolved, that a Governor who like Hutchinson was Chap. XLVII.} 1772. July. not dependent on the people for support, was not such a Governor as the people
August 19th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
cendiary than he in the King's dominions. Hutchinson's letter without date, in Hutchinson's Ms. Collections, i. 437. Written between July 29 and August 5, 1771; probably written early in August, 1771. At least his intrepidity could not be Aug. questioned. His language became more explicit as danger drew nearer. In August, Boston saw in its harbor twelve vessels of war, carrying more than two hundred and sixty guns, commanded by Mon. tagu, the brother of Sandwich. Boston Gazette, 19 Aug. 1771. Yet there was no one salient wrong, to attract the sudden and universal attention of the people. The Southern Governors felt no alarm. Eden from Maryland congratulated Hillsborough, on the return of confidence and harmony. Robert Eden to Hillsborough, 4 August, 1771. The people, thus Johnson, the Agent of Connecticut wrote after his return home, appear to be weary of their altercations with the Mother Country; a little discreet conduct on both sides, would perfectly reestablish
July 1st, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
inia led the courts of law to an axiom, that, as soon as any slave sets his foot on English ground, he becomes free, the King of England stood in the path of humanity, and made himself the pillar of the colonial Slave-Trade. Wherever in the Colonies a disposition was shown for its restraint, his servants were peremptorily ordered to maintain it without abatement. But he blushed to reject the solemn appeal of Virginia personally to himself, and evaded a reply. Hillsborough to Dunmore, 1 July, 1772. For the last five years there had been no contested election in Boston. Deceived by the apparent tranquillity, the friends of Government attempted to defeat the choice of Samuel Adams as Representative. Chap. XLVII.} 1772. May. The effort failed; he had more than twice and a half as many votes as his opponent, Boston Gazette, 11 May, 1772; 892, 3, 2. and the malice of his enemies rendered him still dearer to the people. The Legislature was for the fourth year, convened Jun
. and the malice of his enemies rendered him still dearer to the people. The Legislature was for the fourth year, convened June. at Cambridge; but the Governor had grown weary of his pretensions, and with a very ill grace, against his declared purpose, adjourned the session to the accustomed House in Boston. The long altercation on that subject subsided; but the system of British supremacy was sure to produce new collisions. Inhabitants of Providence, in Rhode Island, had in the last March, complained to the Deputy Governor of the conduct of Lieutenant Dudingston, Commander of the Gaspee, who obstructed their vessels and boats, without showing any evidence of his authority. Hopkins, the Chief Justice, on being consulted, gave the opinion, that any person who should come into the Colony and exercise any authority by force of arms, without showing his commission to the Governor, and if a Custom House officer, without being sworn into his office, was guilty of a trespass, if not
om they should next elect for Speaker, and to dissolve the Assembly in case they should question the right of such negative. Hillsborough to Habersham, 4 Dec. 1771, and 7 August, 1772. The affections of South Carolina were still more 1772. Jan. thoroughly alienated. Its public men were ruled by their sense of honor, and felt a stain upon it as a wound. A Carolinian in the time of Lyttleton, had been abruptly dismissed from the King's Council; and from that day it became the pride of naby patent for the whole; and had offered to establish salaries for the Judges, if the Commissions of those Judges were but made permanent as in England. At last, in 1769, trusting to the honor of the Crown, they voted perpe- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. Jan. tual grants of salaries. When this was done, Rawlins Lowndes and others, their own judges, taken from among themselves, were dismissed; and an Irishman, a Scotchman, and a Welshman were sent over by Hillsborough to take their places. Compare L
September 27th, 1777 AD (search for this): chapter 24
on among the friends of liberty flashed upon his mind. It would be an arduous task, he said, meditating a project which required a year's reflection for its maturity, to awaken a sufficient number in the colonies to so grand an undertaking. Nothing, however, should be despaired of. We have nothing, he continued, to rely upon but the interposition of our friends in Britain, of which I have no expectation, or the last Appeal. Ultima ratio. Samuel Adams' Papers. Letter to Arthur Lee, 27 Sept. 1777, from the draft. Compare in Hutchinson's Papers, III. 236, letter of 30 Sept, 1771. Hutchinson's Papers, III. 242, 243 and 233, letters of 9 Oct. 1771. The tragedy of American freedom is Oct. nearly completed. A tyranny seems to be at the very door. They who lie under oppression deserve what they suffer; let them perish with their oppressors. Could millions be enslaved if all possessed the independent spirit of Brutus, who to his immortal honor, expelled the tyrant of Rome, and hi
June 30th, 1772 AD (search for this): chapter 24
e of Colonial Secretary of State, resolved never to leave pursuing the Colony of Rhode Island, until its Charter should be taken away. Hutchinson to Samuel Hood, 2 Sept. 1772. Remembrancer for 1776, II. 60. A few punished at Execution Dock, would be the only effectual preventive of any further at- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. June. tempt, wrote Hutchinson, who wished to see a beginnin of taking men prisoners, and carrying them directly to England. T. Hutchinson to Capt. Gambier, Boston, 30 June, 1772; in Hutchinson's Papers, III. 354, 355; and Remembrancer for 1776, II. 56. There now existed a statute authorizing such a procedure. Two months before, the King had assented to an Act for the better securing Dock-yards, ships and stores, which extended to the Colonies, made death the penalty for destroying even the oar of a cutter's boat, or the head of an empty cask belonging to the fleet, and subjected the accused to a trial in any county in Great Britain. Of this statute, which vi
May 4th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
of the fortress in Boston harbor. In Georgia, Noble Wimberly Jones, a man of exemplary life and character, had been elected Speaker. Wright, who reported him to be a very strong Liberty Boy, would not consent to the choice; and the House voted the interference a breach of their privileges. Sir James Wright to Hillsborough, 28 February, 1771. Hillsborough had censur- Chap. XLVII.} 1771. Dec. ed their unwarrantable and inconsistent arrogance. 2 Hillsborough to Sir James Wright, 4 May, 1771. He now directed the Governor to put his negative upon any person whom they should next elect for Speaker, and to dissolve the Assembly in case they should question the right of such negative. Hillsborough to Habersham, 4 Dec. 1771, and 7 August, 1772. The affections of South Carolina were still more 1772. Jan. thoroughly alienated. Its public men were ruled by their sense of honor, and felt a stain upon it as a wound. A Carolinian in the time of Lyttleton, had been abruptly dis
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