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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
Checkley to Commissioner of Customs, 12 June, 1772; Governor Wanton to Hillsborough, 16 June, 1772; Admiral Montagu to Hillsborough, 12 June and 11 July, 1772; Deposition of Aaron, a negro, 11 July, 1772; Letter of Charles Dudley, 23 July, 1772. The whole was conducted on a sudden impulse; Representation to the King of the Commissioners of Inquiry, 22 June, 1773. yet Sandwich who was spoken of for the place of Colonial Secretary of State, resolved never to leave pursuing the Colony of Rhode Island, until its Charter should be taken away. Hutchinson to Samuel Hood, 2 Sept. 1772. Remembrancer for 1776, II. 60. A few punished at Execution Dock, would be the only effectual preventive of any further at- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. June. tempt, wrote Hutchinson, who wished to see a beginnin of taking men prisoners, and carrying them directly to England. T. Hutchinson to Capt. Gambier, Boston, 30 June, 1772; in Hutchinson's Papers, III. 354, 355; and Remembrancer for 1776, II. 56. There
James Otis (search for this): chapter 24
771. June. ed; but John Adams retired from the service of the people, and devoting himself to his profession, John Adams: Works, II. 260, 301, 302. for a time ceased even to employ his pen in their defence. John Adams: Diary, June 22, 1771. Otis who had returned to the Legislature, disordered in mind, and jealous of his declining influence, did but impede the public cause. In Hancock, also, vanity so mingled with patriotism, that the Government hoped to separate him from its uncompromisire and more against Adams; now seeking to lull the people Chap. XLVII.} 1771. Dec. into security; now boasting of his band of writers on the side of Government, Church, a professed patriot, being of the number; now triumphing at the spectacle of Otis, who was carried into the country, bound hand and foot as a maniac; now speculating on the sale of cheap teas at high prices; now urging the Government in England to remodel all the New England Provinces, even while he pretended that they were qui
Thomas Whately (search for this): chapter 24
ctacle of Otis, who was carried into the country, bound hand and foot as a maniac; now speculating on the sale of cheap teas at high prices; now urging the Government in England to remodel all the New England Provinces, even while he pretended that they were quiet and submissive. His only fears were lest the advice he had sent to the Ministry should become known in America, and lest Temple, who had gone to England and bore him contemptuous hatred, should estrange from him the confidence of Whately. Confirmed by the seeming tranquillity in America, and by the almost unprecedented strength of the Ministry in Parliament, Hillsborough gave free scope to the conceit, wrongheadedness, obstinacy and passion, which marked his character, and perplexed and embarrassed affairs by the perverse and senseless B. Franklin to S. Cooper, 5 February, 1771. exercise of authority. To show his firmness, he still required the Legislature of Massachusetts to exempt the Commissioners from taxation, o
Hertford, a friend of the King's, Gower the President of the Council, Camden, the Secretaries of the Treasury, W. Duer to Robert R. Livingston Jr., London, 3 August, 1772. and others to become shareholders in his scheme; by their influence, the Lords of Council disregarded the adverse report of the Board of Trade, and decided in favor of planting the new Province. Order in Council, 14 Aug. 1772. Compare Propositions for the Settlement of Pittsylvania, and the Memorial of Franklin and Wharton to the American Congress. Hillsborough was too proud to brook this public insult; and the King, soothing his fall by a patent for a British Earldom, accepted his resignation. But his system remained behind him. When he was gone, Thurlow Knox: Extra Official State Papers, II. 45. took care that the grant for the Western Province should never be sealed; and the amiable Dartmouth, Chap. XLVII.} 1772. Aug. who became Secretary for the Colonies, had been taught to believe, Compare Dartm
Samuel Pemberton (search for this): chapter 24
rthur Lee, II. 186; Compare Hutchinson to R. Jackson, October, 1771. While these opinions were boldly uttered, Hutch- Nov. inson, in the annual Proclamation which appointed the Festival of Thanksgiving and which used to be read from every pulpit, sought to ensnare the clergy by enumerating as a cause for gratitude, that civil and religious liberties were continued, and trade enlarged. He was caught in his own toils. All the Boston ministers except one refused to read the paper; when Pemberton, of whose church the Governor was a member, began confusedly to do so; the patriots of his congregation, turning their backs on him, walked out of meeting in great indignation; and nearly all the Ministers agreed on the Thanksgiving Day to implore of Almighty God the restoration of lost liberties. Cooper to Gov. Pownall, 14, S. Adams's Papers, II. 338; also II. 297. Life of Arthur Lee, II. 186. S. Adams to Henry Marchant, 7 January, 1772. Nowise disheartened, Hutchinson waited eage
Stephen Hopkins (search for this): chapter 24
ts of Providence, in Rhode Island, had in the last March, complained to the Deputy Governor of the conduct of Lieutenant Dudingston, Commander of the Gaspee, who obstructed their vessels and boats, without showing any evidence of his authority. Hopkins, the Chief Justice, on being consulted, gave the opinion, that any person who should come into the Colony and exercise any authority by force of arms, without showing his commission to the Governor, and if a Custom House officer, without being sired at market boats, detained vessels without a colorable pretext, and made illegal seizures of goods of which the recovery cost more than they were worth Gov. Wanton to Sec. of State, 16 June, 1772. Statements of Darius Sessions and Chief Justice Hopkins to Chief Justice Horsmanden in January, 1773. On the ninth of June, the Providence Packet was returning to Providence, and proud of its speed, went gayly on, heedless of the Gaspee. Dudingston gave chase. The tide being at flood, th
t your messages and resolves of the last year were very displeasing to the King; Bradford's State Papers, 311. I shall transmit my messages, and this your extraordinary answer to be laid before him. Thus the Province was led to speculate on the personal opinions of their Sovereign, and to inquire into the use of regal power itself; while the King regarded the contest with Massachusetts as involving not only the power of Great Britain and the rights of the Crown, but his personal honor. Wise men saw the event that was approaching, but not that it was so near. Out of the eater cometh forth meat, said Cooper the clergyman; Samuel Cooper to B. Franklin, 10 July, 1771. and Franklin foretold a bloody struggle, in which America's Chap. XLVII.} 1771. July. growing strength and magnitude, B. Franklin to Committee of Correspondence in Massachusetts, 15 May, 1771. would give her the victory. The progress of opinion was marked by the instructions of the House to its Agent, which u
ion; and nearly all the Ministers agreed on the Thanksgiving Day to implore of Almighty God the restoration of lost liberties. Cooper to Gov. Pownall, 14, S. Adams's Papers, II. 338; also II. 297. Life of Arthur Lee, II. 186. S. Adams to Henry Marchant, 7 January, 1772. Nowise disheartened, Hutchinson waited eagerly Dec. and confidently to hear how the extravagance of the Assembly in their last session would be resented by the King; now striving to set Hancock more and more against Adams; now seeking to lull the people Chap. XLVII.} 1771. Dec. into security; now boasting of his band of writers on the side of Government, Church, a professed patriot, being of the number; now triumphing at the spectacle of Otis, who was carried into the country, bound hand and foot as a maniac; now speculating on the sale of cheap teas at high prices; now urging the Government in England to remodel all the New England Provinces, even while he pretended that they were quiet and submissive. His
John Pownall (search for this): chapter 24
n, too, reported a disposition in all the Colonies to let the controversy with the kingdom subside. Hutchinson to Gov Pownall, 14 October, 1771. The King sent word to tempt Hancock by marks of favor. Hancock and most of the party, said the Gover their virulence. Adams would push the Continent into a rebellion to-morrow, if it was in his power. Hutchinson to John Pownall, Secretary to the Board of Trade, 17 October, 1771. While America generally was so tranquil, Samuel Adams continued muhe Ministers agreed on the Thanksgiving Day to implore of Almighty God the restoration of lost liberties. Cooper to Gov. Pownall, 14, S. Adams's Papers, II. 338; also II. 297. Life of Arthur Lee, II. 186. S. Adams to Henry Marchant, 7 January, 17isavowed, and its first inventors be sacrificed to the rage of the people whom they had deluded. Hutchinson to Secretary John Pownall, 21 July, 1772; in Remembrancer, 1776, II. 57. The Secretary, on his Aug. part, was proceeding with eager haste
of him; his colleagues disliked him, and conspired to drive him into retirement. Franklin to his Son, 17 August, 1772. The occasion was at hand. Franklin had negotiated with the Treasury for a grant to a Company of about twenty-three millions of acres of land, south of the Ohio and west of the Alleghanies; Hillsborough, from the fear that men in the backwoods would be too independent, opposed the project. De Guines, French Ambassador, to Aiguillon, 11 August, 1772. Franklin persuaded Hertford, a friend of the King's, Gower the President of the Council, Camden, the Secretaries of the Treasury, W. Duer to Robert R. Livingston Jr., London, 3 August, 1772. and others to become shareholders in his scheme; by their influence, the Lords of Council disregarded the adverse report of the Board of Trade, and decided in favor of planting the new Province. Order in Council, 14 Aug. 1772. Compare Propositions for the Settlement of Pittsylvania, and the Memorial of Franklin and Wharton
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