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han the market price, he demanded nothing, but was now in England to renew his solicitations. The king wished leave to recruit in Holland, and also to obtain of that republic the loan of its so called Scottish brigade, which consisted no longer of Scots, but chiefly of Walloons and deserters. The consent of the house of Orange could easily have been gained; but the dignity, the principles, and the policy of the States General forbade. This is the first attempt of either party to induce Holland to take part in the American war; and its neutrality gave grievous offence in England. Sir Joseph Yorke, at the Hague, was further directed to gain information on the practicability of using the good dispositions of the king's friends upon the continent, and the military force which its princes might be engaged to supply. For England to recruit in Germany was a defiance of the law of the empire; but Yorke reported that recruits might be raised there in any number, and at a tolerably eas
Arthur Lee (search for this): chapter 10
uld not be kept full by enlistments in Britain. The foreign relations of England became, therefore, of paramount importance. The secretary of state desired to draw from the Chap. L.} 1775. Sept. French ambassador at London a written denial of Lee's assertion, that the Americans had a certainty of receiving support from France and Spain; but the intimation was evaded, for the king of France would not suffer himself to be made an instrument to bend the resistance of the Americans. If they sportunities of gaining information from the most various sources, encouraged the notion that England might seek to recover her colonies by entering on a war with France, and thus reviving their ancient sympathies. Having become acquainted with Arthur Lee, and having received accurate accounts of the state of America from persons newly arrived, he left London abruptly, ran over to Paris, and through De Sartine, presented to the king a secret memorial in favor of taking part with the insurgents.
was further directed to gain information on the practicability of using the good dispositions of the king's friends upon the continent, and the military force which its princes might be engaged to supply. For England to recruit in Germany was a defiance of the law of the empire; but Yorke reported that recruits might be raised there in any number, and at a tolerably easy rate; and that bodies of troops might be obtained of the princes of Hesse Cassel, Wurtemberg, Saxe Gotha, Darmstadt, and Baden. But for the moment England had in contemplation a larger scheme. Gunning's private and confidential despatch from Moscow was received in London on the first day of September, with elation and delight. That very day Suffolk prepared an answer to the minister. To Catharine, George himself, with his own hand wrote a very polite epistle, requesting her friendly Chap. L.} 1775. Sept. assistance: I accept the succor that your majesty offers me of a part of your troops, whom the acts of re
rge the Third Fared in his Bid for Russians. September, October—1775. the king's proclamation was a contemptuous defi- Chap. L.} 1775. Sept. ance of the opposition, alike of the party of Rockingham and the party of Chatham, as the instigators, correspondents, and accomplices of the American rebels. Party spirit was exasperated and embittered, and Rochford was heard repeatedly to foretell, that before the winter should pass over, heads would fall on the block. The king of England, said Wilkes, the lord mayor of London, in conversation at a public dinner, hates me; I have always despised him: the time is come to decide which of us understands the other best, and in what direction heads are to fall. The French statesmen who, with wonderful powers of penetration, analyzed the public men and their acts, but neither the institutions nor the people of England, complacently contrasted its seeming anarchy with their own happiness in living peacefully under a good and virtuous king. Fo
Ivan Ctzernichew (search for this): chapter 10
me the subject was debated in council, and objections without end rose up against the proposed traffic in troops, from the condition of the army wasted by wars, the divisions in Poland, the hostile attitude of Sweden, the dignity of the empress, the danger of disturbing her diplomatic relations with other European powers, the grievous discontents it would engender among her own subjects. She asked Panin whether granting the king such assistance would not disgust the British nation; and Ivan Ctzernichew, lately her ambassador at London, now minister of the marine, declared that it would give offence to the great body of the people of England, who were vehemently opposed to the policy of the king and his ministers. Besides, what motive had the people of Russia to interfere against the armed husbandmen of New England? Why should the oldest monarchy of modern Europe, the connecting link between the world of antiquity and the modern world, assist to repress the development of the young
Robert Howe (search for this): chapter 10
pped and prepared on the opening of the Baltic in spring, to embark by way of England for Canada, where they were to be under the supreme command of the British general. The journey from London to Moscow required about twenty three days; yet they were all so overweeningly confident, that they hoped to get the definitive promise by the twenty third of October, in season to announce it at the opening of parliament; and early in September Lord Dartmouth and his secretary hurried off messages to Howe and to Carleton, that the empress had given the most ample assurances of letting them have any number of infantry that might be wanted. On the eighth, Suffolk despatched a second courier to Gunning, with a project of a treaty for taking a body of Russian troops into the pay and service of Great Britain. The treaty was to continue for two years, within which the king and his ministers were confident of crushing the insurrection. The levy money for the troops might be seven pounds sterling
hough victorious, when it comes out of a long war in a murderous climate. There is an impropriety in employing so considerable a body in another hemisphere, under a power almost unknown to it, and almost deprived of all correspondence with its sovereign. My own confidence in my peace, which has cost me so great efforts to acquire, demands absolutely that I do not deprive myself so soon of so considerable a part of my forces. Affairs on the side of Sweden are but put to sleep, and those of Poland are not yet definitively terminated. Moreover, I should not be able to prevent myself from reflecting on the consequences which would result for our own dignity, for that of the two monarchies and the two nations, from this junction of our forces, simply to calm a rebellion which is not supported by any foreign power. Every word of the letter of the king of England Chap. L.} 1775. Oct. to the empress of Russia was in his own hand; she purposely employed her private secretary to write he
Chap. L.} 1775. Sept. twinkle that shall be given me; and like the beggar that sends his goods as a present to a rich patron from whose charity he means to extort more than the market price, he demanded nothing, but was now in England to renew his solicitations. The king wished leave to recruit in Holland, and also to obtain of that republic the loan of its so called Scottish brigade, which consisted no longer of Scots, but chiefly of Walloons and deserters. The consent of the house of Orange could easily have been gained; but the dignity, the principles, and the policy of the States General forbade. This is the first attempt of either party to induce Holland to take part in the American war; and its neutrality gave grievous offence in England. Sir Joseph Yorke, at the Hague, was further directed to gain information on the practicability of using the good dispositions of the king's friends upon the continent, and the military force which its princes might be engaged to supply
ngland had in contemplation a larger scheme. Gunning's private and confidential despatch from Moscme on this occasion. Armed with this letter, Gunning was ordered to ask an audience of the empressighth, Suffolk despatched a second courier to Gunning, with a project of a treaty for taking a body will not conceal from you, wrote Suffolk to Gunning, Chap. L.} 1775. Sept. that this accession oeft England, when, on the tenth of September, Gunning at court poured out to the empress assurancesce. The empress having returned to Moscow, Gunning, at five in the afternoon of the thirtieth, w had been made, and after much expostulation, Gunning confessed: It is true; in your answer to me nter of George the Third. The next morning, Gunning went to Panin before Oct. he was up, and to ourier, with the project of a treaty, reached Gunning on the fourth of October; he seized the earliress continued to be profuse of courtesies to Gunning; and when in December he took his leave, she [3 more...]
himself to be made an instrument to bend the resistance of the Americans. If they should make us any application, said Vergennes, we shall dismiss them politely, and we shall keep their secret. Beaumarchais who was then in England as an emissarythe subject was discussed in the council of the king, De Sartine put a new commission into the hands of Beaumarchais. Vergennes continued to present Chap. L} 1775. Sept. America to his mind in every possible aspect. He found it difficult to beliuld render it in any event impossible to restore affectionate relations between the parent state and the colonies. But Vergennes had not penetrated the character of the British government of his day, which, in the management of domestic affairs, wadominions. For a short time a report prevailed through western Europe, that the English request was to be granted; but Vergennes rejected it as incredible, and wrote to the French envoy at Moscow: I cannot reconcile Catharine's elevation of soul wi
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