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November, 1775 AD (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 53: The March to Quebec. September—November, 1775. The detachment which Washington, as he thought- Chap. LIII.} 1775. Sept. fully brooded over the future without hope of a speedy termination of the war, sent against Quebec, consisted of ten companies of New England infantry, one of riflemen from Virginia, and two from Pennsylvania, in all two battalions of about eleven hundred men. The command was given to Arnold, who, as a trader in years past, had visited Quebec, where he still had correspondents. In person he was short of stature and of a florid complexion; his broad, compact frame displayed a strong animal nature and power of endurance; he was complaisant and persuasive in his manners; daringly and desperately brave; avaricious and profuse; grasping but not sordid; sanguinely hopeful; of restless activity; intelligent and enterprising. The next in rank as lieutenant colonels were Roger Enos, who proved to be a craven, and the brave Christopher Greene of R
on and precious stores, which they had brought along with so much toil. The first day of November was bright and warm, Nov. like the weather of New England. I passed a number of soldiers who had no provisions, and some that were sick and had no pght whitewashed houses, the comfortable abodes of a cheerful, courteous, and hospitable people. Here Chap. LIII.} 1775. Nov. and there along the road chapels met their eyes, and images of the Virgin Mary and rude imitations of the Savior's sorrowsybreak on the morning of the fourteenth, all of his party, except about one hundred and fifty left at Chap. LIII.} 1775. Nov. Point Levi, were landed undiscovered, yet without their ladders, at Wolfe's cove. The feeble band met no resistance as thf any kind being brought in. Yet the invaders were not to be dreaded, except for their friends within Chap. LIII.} 1775. Nov. the walls, whose rising would have offered the only chance of success; but of this there were no signs. Arnold then order
eir waists in water, hauling their boats against a very rapid current. On the fourth of October they passed the vestiges Oct. of an Indian chapel, a fort, and the grave of the missionary Rasle. After they took leave of settlements and houses at No the party reached the dividing ridge between the Kennebec and Dead River. Their road now lay through Chap. LIII.} 1775 Oct. forests of pines, balsam fir, cedar, cypress, hemlock, and yellow birch, and over three ponds, that lay hid among the treest. The mountains had been clad in snow since September; winter was howling around them, and their Chap. LIII.} 1775. Oct. course was still to the north. On the night preceding the twenty eighth of October, some of the party encamped on the heiour times to fetch their baggage; and yet starving, deserted, with an enemy's country and uncertainty Chap. LIII.} 1775. Oct. ahead, officers and men, inspired with the love of liberty and their country, pushed on with invincible fortitude. The
conveyed arms and stores through the thick woods of a rough, uninhabited, and almost trackless wild; now rowing, now dragging their boats, now bearing them on their backs round rapids and cataracts, across morasses, over craggy highlands. On the tenth the party reached the dividing ridge between the Kennebec and Dead River. Their road now lay through Chap. LIII.} 1775 Oct. forests of pines, balsam fir, cedar, cypress, hemlock, and yellow birch, and over three ponds, that lay hid among the tleast, intercepted. On the eighth of November his approach was known at Quebec, but not the amount of his force; and the British officers, in this state of uncertainty, were not without apprehensions that the affair would soon be over. On the tenth Arnold arrived at Point LeVI, but all boats had been carefully removed from that side of the Saint Lawrence. He waited until the thirteenth for the rear to come up, and employed the time in making ladders and collecting canoes, while Quebec was
November 8th (search for this): chapter 13
odes of a cheerful, courteous, and hospitable people. Here Chap. LIII.} 1775. Nov. and there along the road chapels met their eyes, and images of the Virgin Mary and rude imitations of the Savior's sorrows. For seven weeks Cramahe, the lieutenant governor, had been repairing the breaches in the walls of Quebec, which were now put into a good posture for defence. The repeated communications, intrusted by Arnold to friendly Indians, had been, in part at least, intercepted. On the eighth of November his approach was known at Quebec, but not the amount of his force; and the British officers, in this state of uncertainty, were not without apprehensions that the affair would soon be over. On the tenth Arnold arrived at Point LeVI, but all boats had been carefully removed from that side of the Saint Lawrence. He waited until the thirteenth for the rear to come up, and employed the time in making ladders and collecting canoes, while Quebec was rapidly gaining strength for resistanc
Chapter 53: The March to Quebec. September—November, 1775. The detachment which Washington, as he thought- Chap. LIII.} 1775. Sept. fully brooded over the future without hope of a speedSept. fully brooded over the future without hope of a speedy termination of the war, sent against Quebec, consisted of ten companies of New England infantry, one of riflemen from Virginia, and two from Pennsylvania, in all two battalions of about eleven hundd to be a craven, and the brave Christopher Greene of Rhode Island. The ma- Chap. LIII.} 1775 Sept. jors were Return J. Meigs of Connecticut, and Timothy Bigelow, the early patriot of Worcester, M borne into the Kennebec. They passed the bay where that river and the An- Chap. LIII.} 1775. Sept. droscoggin hold their merry meeting; on the twenty first they reached the two block houses, and ficers in Canada would surely defend to the last. The mountains had been clad in snow since September; winter was howling around them, and their Chap. LIII.} 1775. Oct. course was still to the n
Chapter 53: The March to Quebec. September—November, 1775. The detachment which Washington, as he thought- Chap. LIII.} 1775. Sept. fully brooded over the future without hope of a speedy termination of the war, sent against Quebec, consisted of ten companies of New England infantry, one of riflemen from Virginia, and two from Pennsylvania, in all two battalions of about eleven hundred men. The command was given to Arnold, who, as a trader in years past, had visited Quebec, where he still had correspondents. In person he was short of stature and of a florid complexion; his broad, compact frame displayed a strong animal nature and power of endurance; he was complaisant and persuasive in his manners; daringly and desperately brave; avaricious and profuse; grasping but not sordid; sanguinely hopeful; of restless activity; intelligent and enterprising. The next in rank as lieutenant colonels were Roger Enos, who proved to be a craven, and the brave Christopher Greene of
munition and precious stores, which they had brought along with so much toil. The first day of November was bright and warm, Nov. like the weather of New England. I passed a number of soldiers who had no provisions, and some that were sick and had no power to help them, writes one of the party. At last, on the second of that month, French Canadians came up with two horses, driving before them five oxen; at which the party fired a salute for joy, and laughed with frantic delight. On the fourth, about an hour before noon, they descried a house at Sertigan, twenty five leagues from Quebec, near the fork of the Chaudiere and the De Loup. It was the first they had seen for thirty one days; and never could the view of rich cultivated fields or of flourishing cities awaken such ecstasy of gladness as this rude hovel on the edge of the wilderness. They did not forget their disabled fellow soldiers: McLeland was brought down to the comfortable shelter, though he breathed his farewell to
foaming Chaudiere hurries swiftly down its rocky channel. Too eager to descend it quickly, the adventurers had three of their boats overset in the whirls of the stream; losing ammunition and precious stores, which they had brought along with so much toil. The first day of November was bright and warm, Nov. like the weather of New England. I passed a number of soldiers who had no provisions, and some that were sick and had no power to help them, writes one of the party. At last, on the second of that month, French Canadians came up with two horses, driving before them five oxen; at which the party fired a salute for joy, and laughed with frantic delight. On the fourth, about an hour before noon, they descried a house at Sertigan, twenty five leagues from Quebec, near the fork of the Chaudiere and the De Loup. It was the first they had seen for thirty one days; and never could the view of rich cultivated fields or of flourishing cities awaken such ecstasy of gladness as this rud
October 28th (search for this): chapter 13
Cambridge. Yet the diminished party, enfeebled by sickness and desertion, with scanty food, and little ammunition, still persevered in their purpose to appear before a citadel, which was held to be the strongest in North America, and which the English officers in Canada would surely defend to the last. The mountains had been clad in snow since September; winter was howling around them, and their Chap. LIII.} 1775. Oct. course was still to the north. On the night preceding the twenty eighth of October, some of the party encamped on the height of land that divides the waters of the Saint Lawrence and the Atlantic. As they advanced their sufferings increased. Some went barefoot for days together. Their clothes had become so torn, they were almost naked, and in their march were lacerated by thorns; at night they had no couch or covering but branches of evergreens. Often for successive days and nights they were exposed to cold, drenching storms, and had to cross streams that were
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