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the confederation by demanding that the public lands north-west of the Ohio should first be recognised as the common property of all the states, and held as a common resource to discharge the debts contracted by congress for the Chap. V.} 1778. July 8. expenses of the war. Gerard to Vergennes, Philadelphia, 12 August, 1778. On the eighth of July the French fleet, consisting of twelve ships of the line and three frigates, after a rough voyage of nearly ninety days from Toulon, anchored ieighth of July the French fleet, consisting of twelve ships of the line and three frigates, after a rough voyage of nearly ninety days from Toulon, anchored in the bay of Delaware; ten days too late to intercept the inferior squadron of Lord Howe and its multitude of transports on their retreat from Philadelphia. Its admiral, the Count d'estaing, a major-general in the French army, had persuaded Marie Antoinette to propose the expedition. On the eleventh, congress learned from his letters 11. that he was ready to co-operate with the states in the reduction of the British army and navy. The first invitation to a concert of measures revealed the in
, Philadelphia, 12 August, 1778. On the eighth of July the French fleet, consisting of twelve ships of the line and three frigates, after a rough voyage of nearly ninety days from Toulon, anchored in the bay of Delaware; ten days too late to intercept the inferior squadron of Lord Howe and its multitude of transports on their retreat from Philadelphia. Its admiral, the Count d'estaing, a major-general in the French army, had persuaded Marie Antoinette to propose the expedition. On the eleventh, congress learned from his letters 11. that he was ready to co-operate with the states in the reduction of the British army and navy. The first invitation to a concert of measures revealed the inability of the American people to fulfil their engagements. For want of an organized government congress could do no more than empower Washington to call upon the six states north of the Delaware for aids of militia, while its financial measure was a popular loan to be raised throughout the count
western domain: but, after unassisted efforts for a more efficient union, the state, on the twentyfifth of the following November, accepted the confederacy without amendment; and on the fifth of May, 1779, the delegates of Delaware did the same. Marurprised light infantry under Pulaski's command; and, cumbering themselves with no prisoners, killed all they could. In November a large party of Indians with bands of Nov. tories and regulars entered Cherry valley by an unguarded pass, and, findinNov. tories and regulars entered Cherry valley by an unguarded pass, and, finding the fort too strong to be taken, murdered and scalped more than thirty of the Chap. V.} 1778. Nov. inhabitants, most of them women and children. The story of these massacres was repeated from village to village, and strengthened the purpose of rNov. inhabitants, most of them women and children. The story of these massacres was repeated from village to village, and strengthened the purpose of resistance. With the year 1778, South Carolina, which for two years had been unvisited by an enemy, after long deliberation established a permanent form of government. Immediately after the general declaration of independence, its citizens, by com
December 2nd, 1777 AD (search for this): chapter 6
change of opinion was shown most clearly by the votes of parliament. In February, 1774, the house of commons, in a moment of unrestrained passion; adopted measures for enforcing the traditional absolutism of parliament by majorities of three to one: corresponding majorities in February, 1778, reversed its judgment, repealed the punitive acts, and conceded every thing which the colonies Chap. V.} 1778. had demanded. There was a general cry for peace. Edward Gibbon to J. Holroyd, 2 Dec., 1777, and 4 Dec., 1777. The king, in January, 1778, confessed to Lord North: The time may come when it will be wise to abandon all North America but Canada, Nova Scotia, and the Floridas; but then the generality of the nation must see it first in that light. Donne, II. 118. Lord Rockingham was convinced himself and desired to convince the public of the impossibility of going on with the war. Chat. Cor., IV. 488. Donne, II. 123. On the second of February, Fox spoke against its continuanc
h a party of infantry, surprising Baylor's light horse, used the bayonet mercilessly against men that sued for quarter. A band led by Captain Patrick Ferguson in October, Oct. after destroying the shipping in Little Egg harbor, spread through the neighboring country to burn the houses and waste the lands of the patriots. On the Oct. after destroying the shipping in Little Egg harbor, spread through the neighboring country to burn the houses and waste the lands of the patriots. On the night of the fifteenth they surprised light infantry under Pulaski's command; and, cumbering themselves with no prisoners, killed all they could. In November a large party of Indians with bands of Nov. tories and regulars entered Cherry valley by an unguarded pass, and, finding the fort too strong to be taken, murdered and scalates to the south of the Susquehanna. Germain to Clinton, 8 March, 1778. For this end the British commander-in-chief at New York was ordered to despatch before October, if possible, a thousand men to re-enforce Pensacola, and three thousand to take Savannah. Two thousand more were destined as a re-enforcement to St. Augustine.
on-ball before it comes to rest. On the second of July, the president and several members of congress met once more in Philadelphia. On the ninth, the articles of confederation, engrossed 9. on parchment, were signed by eight states. On the tenth, congress issued a circular to the other five, 10. urging them to conclude the glorious compact which was to unite the strength, wealth, and councils of the whole. North Carolina acceded on the twenty-first; Georgia, on the twenty-fourth. New ing of the ninth, without notice to d'estaing, crossed 9. with his troops from the side of Tiverton. Scarcely had he done so, when the squadron of Lord Howe, which had been re-enforced from England, was seen to anchor near Point Judith. On the tenth a strong 10. wind rising from the north-east, d'estaing by the advice of his officers, among whom were Suffren and de Grasse, sailed past the Newport batteries, and in order of battle bore down upon the British squadron. Lord Howe stood to the s
s exhausted, Chap. V.} 1778. July 2. and the remainder of the war was like the last rebounds of a cannon-ball before it comes to rest. On the second of July, the president and several members of congress met once more in Philadelphia. On the ninth, the articles of confederation, engrossed 9. on parchment, were signed by eight states. On the tenth, congress issued a circular to the other five, 10. urging them to conclude the glorious compact which was to unite the strength, wealth, and cen days in the offing, ran past the British batteries into the harbor of Newport. The landing had been concerted for the tenth; but, learning that the British outpost on the north of the island had been withdrawn, Sullivan, on the morning of the ninth, without notice to d'estaing, crossed 9. with his troops from the side of Tiverton. Scarcely had he done so, when the squadron of Lord Howe, which had been re-enforced from England, was seen to anchor near Point Judith. On the tenth a strong
September (search for this): chapter 6
forcement of four thousand men, landed the day after the escape. 31. The British general returned to New York, having Sept. accomplished nothing, except that a detachment under Grey set fire to the shipping in New Bedford, and then levied cattlesh government or its army to reduce the United States served only to promote its independence. In 1775 Chap. V.} 1778. Sept. they sought to annihilate the rebellion by attacking it at its source; and before many months they were driven out of Bos under Clinton could hold no part of the country, and only ravage and destroy by sudden expeditions. Towards the end of Sept. September Cornwallis led a foray into New Jersey; and Major-General Grey with a party of infantry, surprising Baylor's liSeptember Cornwallis led a foray into New Jersey; and Major-General Grey with a party of infantry, surprising Baylor's light horse, used the bayonet mercilessly against men that sued for quarter. A band led by Captain Patrick Ferguson in October, Oct. after destroying the shipping in Little Egg harbor, spread through the neighboring country to burn the houses and wa
July 15th, 1778 AD (search for this): chapter 6
ttle, could pilots have been found to take its largest ships through the channel. Since New York could not be reached, d'estaing, ignorant of — the secret policy of France and Spain, Chap. V.} 1778. indulged the dream of capturing the British towns in Newfoundland and annexing that island to the American republic as a fourteenth state with representation in congress. Extract of a letter of the Count d'estaing to Gerard de Rayneval, in Gerard de Rayneval to the Count de Vergennes, 15 July, 1778. Washington proposed to employ the temporary superiority at sea in the capture of Rhode Island and its garrison of six thousand men. He had in advance summoned Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island to send quotas of their militia for the expedition. The council of war of Rhode Island, exceeding his requirement, called out one half of the effective force of the state for twenty days from the first of August, and ordered the remainder to be ready at a minute's warning. Out of his
a passion on the alliance of America with the French, for whom he cherished implacable hate. Through his interest, and by the blandishments of gifts and pay and chances of revenge, Colonel John Butler lured the Seneca warriors to cross the border of Pennsylvania under the British flag. The party of savages and rangers, numbering between five hundred and seven hundred men, fell down the Tioga river, and on the last day of June hid in 30. the forests above Wyoming. The next day the two July 1. northernmost forts capitulated. The men of Wyoming, old and young, with one regular company, in all hardly more than three hundred, took counsel with one another, and found no hope of deliverance for their families but through a victorious encounter with a foe of twice their number, and more skilful in the woods than themselves. On the third of July, the 3. devoted band, led by Colonel Zebulon Butler, who had just returned from the continental service, began their march up the river. Th
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